Categories
PUA red pill

Wot’s all this then? Red Pill romancer plans to pull the birds with a fake British accent

Romance and fake British accents don’t go together like beans on toast

They are seriously running out of ideas over there on the Ask The Red Pill subreddit.

Oi! Piss off, mate!

Follow me on Twitter.

Send tips to dfutrelle at gmail dot com.

We Hunted the Mammoth relies entirely on readers like you for its survival. If you appreciate our work, please send a few bucks our way! Thanks!

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

97 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Lumipuna
Lumipuna
14 days ago

Is there a difference in what “accent” vs. “dialect” means, technically speaking? I’m never quite sure based on how the terms are used in everyday discussions.

I thought dialect is the regional (or sometimes social) pattern of vocabulary and pronunciation, whereas accent is something to do with the rhythm/intonation of your speech. For example, dialect would be usually how a cunning linguist tells apart people from neighboring villages.

Penny Psmith
Penny Psmith
14 days ago

Re: accents – if any of you aren’t familiar with Eric Singer’s videos on accents, dialects and other things like that (I think most of them are on Wired’s YouTube channel), I highly suggest looking them up. They’re absolutely delightful and fascinating. He’s a dialect coach with a lot of knowledge on the subject, and the way he explains different modes of speech (down to really small differences that personally I van barely hear, becase I’m not great with accents) while slipping into them and between them effortlessly is just amazing. Recently he’s done a series of videos on US accents (part 2 just came out today, not sure how many there’ll eventually be), which is even more great than usual because it has guest appearances from BIPOC linguists and dialect coaches explaining about various Black/Latinx/Native accents and dialects that are usually under-represented in such discussions. But check out everything. It’s really awesome.

Dalillama
14 days ago

@Lumipuna
Accent refers specifically to pronunciation, dialect includes vocabulary. In practice they’re often used interchangeably, though.

Lumipuna
Lumipuna
14 days ago

Here are some of my earliest personal impressions of people speaking English in British accents.

Richard Dawkins (ca. 2006, still appearing normal), doing a live talk at the University of Helsinki: “Oh wow, British accent is so charming and pleasant to listen”

Some lady working in customer service at the Stanstead airport: “Excuse me, can you repeat that more slowly and with actual words?”

Re: English cuisine

I first saw bubble and squeak mentioned in Unseen Academicals, and I absolutely assumed it was something Pratchett just made up. Wasn’t so sure about peasen.

Dalillama
14 days ago

Peasen, pease, and split peas are all words for the same thing. Likewise, Peasen, pease porridge/pudding, and split pea soup are all the same dish, being boiled peas, usually with pig bones/meat in.

Naglfar
Naglfar
14 days ago

Re: Limbaugh
I won’t miss him. Unfortunately, he did the damage and won’t see much the harm he wrought.

Lumipuna
Lumipuna
14 days ago

Dalillama – Thanks.

Many Finns understand (more or less) the concept of accent in English context, but it doesn’t seem to really exist (as you described) in Finnish. Finnish orthography is so strictly phonetic that the concept of pronunciation is never even discussed. Regionally variable pronunciations of a word are perceived to be different word variants (and hence a matter of vocabulary variation), and if you write them in standard spelling (as is conventional), you’re technically writing standard Finnish rather than the local dialect.

Lumipuna
Lumipuna
14 days ago

I gathered some years ago that “split peas” refers to peel-less peas. I was only familiar with pea soup made from whole peas. I used to like it, but nowadays my bowel is too irritable to digest it.

mcbender
14 days ago

I haven’t commented here in ages, but this is a topic I am peculiarly qualified to address so I thought I should weigh in.

I have what can best be called a peculiar idiosyncratic accent. I’ve always been something of an Anglophile. I grew up in the northeastern US, but in my teens consumed a lot of content featuring Brits (Douglas Adams, Richard Dawkins, Monty Python, etc, the list goes on) and a lot of the people I most admired were British. I shudder to think of it now (ugh, Dawkins). I ended up picking up a lot of the pronunciation; to this day I’m still not sure how much was accidental and how much deliberate affectation (hard as that is to admit). The more anxious I am, the stronger the accent comes out, which means it tends to be most pronounced when I meet new people.

Which, to the point, means a lot of Americans think I sound English, or maybe Australian; more knowledgeable ones tend to guess things like South Africa or New Zealand because they recognise it’s not quite any of the common English ones they’re familiar with. Interestingly, my partner is English, and she and her family have both told me I sound generically American to them and that they can’t comprehend anyone thinking I’m English, so it’s all a matter of perspective.

First and foremost: this person is absolutely barking up the wrong tree if he’s aiming it at British people, because they will definitely know you’re faking it and at absolute best they won’t give a fuck. He says he lives in Britain, he should fucking know this.

If he wants to impress Americans… I honestly can’t say with certainty it wouldn’t work, sadly. My accent and my voice have definitely gotten (or kept) me attention I wouldn’t otherwise have had (though I think it’s usually just the mystery of “what the fuck is this weird accent I’ve never heard”). Of necessity, though, it’s a pretty shallow sort of thing, and more often than not just annoys me. I can’t say whether any of that interest has been sexual, I’m asexual-spectrum and pretty oblivious to that sort of thing so who knows (well, one time I know it was, but the woman in question went on to sexually assault me so it’s not exactly a fond memory).

I doubt this person’s claims of “pulling” or whatever, though, if he were that successful he wouldn’t be asking for dumb advice like this. I look forward to him trying this and thoroughly humiliating himself.

Completely unrelated, I love baked beans on toast (especially for breakfast) but weirdly I prefer the American style of baked beans, which probably horrifies people equally on both sides of the pond!

Moggie
Moggie
14 days ago

While it’s true that native British English speakers will usually know when a foreigner is faking a British accent, this is not equally true for all of our accents. If you want to pass, probably your best bet is to learn RP (received pronunciation) and sound like a toff. I’ve seen many Americans do this convincingly.

Policy of Madness
Policy of Madness
14 days ago

Unfortunately, he did the damage and won’t see much the harm he wrought.

Oh, he saw the harm and celebrated it. He lived for harming others.

Allandrel
Allandrel
14 days ago

Rush Limbaugh is one of the reasons that my paternal grandfather spent the last decade of his life voting for me to die.

Full Metal Ox
14 days ago

@GSS ex-noob:

@Full Metal Ox: I have been meaning for a few days to wish you a Happy Year of the You.

Thank you—and you picked an opportune time to do so, because today I’m also having a Significant Birthday.

@Dalilama:

The “neutral” American accent is one that nobody has ever spoken natively, but was developed by newscasters and other early broadcasters to be understandable to the maximum number of speakers.

And if (having somehow gotten the idea that Broadcast American English is optimally correct English) you attempt to use it in everyday life, people will laugh and laugh and laugh. Particularly if you’ve gone with early black-and-white cinema and radio enunciation. Why, no, I wasn’t a weird neurodivergent kid with far more media exposure than socialization.

@mcbender:

If he wants to impress Americans… I honestly can’t say with certainty it wouldn’t work, sadly. My accent and my voice have definitely gotten (or kept) me attention I wouldn’t otherwise have had (though I think it’s usually just the mystery of “what the fuck is this weird accent I’ve never heard”)

This may have been what was going on with my mother’s friend (see above.)

Completely unrelated, I love baked beans on toast (especially for breakfast) but weirdly I prefer the American style of baked beans, which probably horrifies people equally on both sides of the pond!

Then here’s a recipe from The I Hate to Housekeep Book (Fawcett Crest paperback edition, July 1965, pp.62-63) by Peg Bracken: the Cookery of My People!

 WIENERINOS

“You’ll need a slice of French bread or plain bread per customer.
Toast the slices on one side only. On the other side, spread, in this order:

plain yellow hot-dog mustard
chopped green onions 
a good big dollop of canned beans
(any kind—tomato sauce-style or New England; they can be hot from the double boiler if you like, but it’s not necessary)
a good chunk of cheese
(Cheddar, Swiss, or what-have-you)
2 or 3 strips of uncooked bacon 

Slide them under the broiler, four of five inches front the heating element or flame, until the bacon is done.”

(I’ve taken the liberty of changing the original name, “Beanerinos”; first, because a Google search on the word suggests that it’s an anti-Mexican slur, and secondly because my family substituted hot dogs sliced into medallions for the bacon.)

Last edited 14 days ago by Full Metal Ox
Threp (formerly Shadowplay)
Threp (formerly Shadowplay)
14 days ago

@Lumipuna

Is there a difference in what “accent” vs. “dialect” means, technically speaking?

Dialect is what you say, accent is how you say it.

Edit: Ninja’d

Last edited 14 days ago by Threp (formerly Shadowplay)
Naglfar
Naglfar
14 days ago

@PoM

Oh, he saw the harm and celebrated it. He lived for harming others.

True, he did see some of the harm, but there are long term things which would have even affected him which he will never see. Climate change, for instance.

Robert
Robert
14 days ago

When I met my first husband in 1985, he thought I was from the UK because I spoke clear, precise, grammatically correct English. He was from Panama, which may have affected his perception.

Full Metal Ox, many felicitations on your birthday! I’m a fellow metal ox, and will be celebrating my birthday on International Women’s Day next month. I just spent the afternoon with my older son, who is a fire ox.

numerobis
numerobis
14 days ago

And a language is a dialect with an army and a navy.

numerobis
numerobis
14 days ago

Dalillama: I natively speak neutral news-program American English. I’m not sure exactly how; I discovered after returning home from my first college semester that absolutely everyone including my dad had a Canadian accent, and I just … didn’t. It wasn’t my first language but I was only about 6 or 7 when I starting speaking principally English.

Full Metal Ox
14 days ago

@numerobis

If I’m not being rude to ask, are you Québécois/e, then? I notice that your nom de net is an Asterix reference.

Surplus to Requirements
Surplus to Requirements
14 days ago

@Dalillama:

Peasen, pease, and split peas are all words for the same thing. Likewise, Peasen, pease porridge/pudding, and split pea soup are all the same dish, being boiled peas, usually with pig bones/meat in.

Eh? Humans can’t eat bones.

Also, eww.

Naglfar
Naglfar
14 days ago

@Surplus

Eh? Humans can’t eat bones.

Just like with gelatin or bone broth, the bones are boiled with it, then removed.

mcbender
14 days ago

@Full Metal Ox
As I’m vegetarian the core concept of that recipe doesn’t quite work for me, but I can see why people would like it!

Snowberry
Snowberry
14 days ago

“Humans can’t eat bones”? Says you. If you boil them in weak acid for long enough, they’ll turn soft enough to eat without damaging your teeth or getting splinters in your throat. What’s left of them doesn’t taste like much, though. I’ve tried.

GSS ex-noob
GSS ex-noob
14 days ago

@Hambeast: but the Valley Girl accent had already spread before Moon Unit’s song came out, fer shure. We girls talked that way in my Colorado high school in the late 70s. The song came out in 1982, by which time we’d all given it up too. So I’m thinking even Nebraska (just one state over) girls should have picked up the speech by then.

Janice the Muppet from Dr. Teeth’s band talked that way on “The Muppet Show”, which ran from 1976.

I remember thinking the song was kind of out of date even when released. I guess I was ahead of the curve once in my life.

Moon Custafer
Moon Custafer
14 days ago

Elaine the Witch:
But then again I’m from Kansas and I can’t imagine eating chili without a giant cinnamon roll on top of it.

???!!!!!!

Full Metal Ox:
I love Peg Brackett. Her “Sweep Steak” recipe is the reason I can now roast things (I’d got it into my head it was terribly difficult, so I’d never tried. Turns out it’s just a question of having several hours, but you don’t actually have to stay by the oven the whole time and can go do other stuff while it cooks).

GSS ex-noob
GSS ex-noob
14 days ago

@Full Metal Ox: then extra felicitations to you!

Full Metal Ox
14 days ago

@Snowberry; @Naglfar; @Surplus to Requirements:

Canned fish bones—as in sardines, salmon, or jack mackerel—are not only soft enough to be readily edible, with a gratifying slightly gritty crunch, but a nutritional perk for the calcium they yield.

GSS ex-noob
GSS ex-noob
14 days ago

Oh, and my bet is this miggie comes up with some unholy combo of RP and Dick van Dyke in “Mary Poppins”.

Reminds me of the time I met a college guy who was originally from China and learned his English in Glasgow. That was a… distinctive accent.

FlyByKiwi
FlyByKiwi
14 days ago

I live in NZ and am well familiar with the beans on toast thing but for added patriotism would have to get Watties, not Heinz. I have to object to the suggestion you’d let the toast cool a bit to improve structural integrity- cold toast is a crime almost on a par with the chip butty. Ewwwwww. Also, the kiwi newsreader circa 1950s did an accent that we would have considered was posh English, like the Queen, but would probably have given any genuine Brit heart palpitations

Wannabikkit
Wannabikkit
13 days ago

FlyByKiwi, aren’t Watties and Heinz the same thing in NZ? It’s been a while since I last bought baked beans but I seem to recall the labels have that same distinctive shape.

Elaine The Witch
Elaine The Witch
13 days ago

@moon clustafer

You get a bowl of chilli. You put a cinnamon role to on top. You dunk the cinnamon roll in the chili. You take a bite. It’s delicious. We raise our children on this. Winter time comes around ever kid gets that for a school meal and then you grow up and it’s as normal as breathing. I can’t eat chilli without a cinnamon roll.

Kat, ambassador, feminist revolution (in exile)
Kat, ambassador, feminist revolution (in exile)
13 days ago

I once asked a British coworker (with a very British accent) if her family back home said that she had acquired an American accent. When she said yes, I was pretty surprised.

As far as baked beans on bread goes, I loved this stuff when I was a child. It was my very own independent invention. I’ve heard that this combination was popular in the USA during the Great Depression.

Masse_Mysteria
Masse_Mysteria
13 days ago

re: subitizing
I knew this was a thing, but I’d thought the number was higher than five. Good to know I’m not defective!

I assumed I’d been able to recognize groups of six before, but now that I think about it, I may have just recognized them as two groups of three instead.

re: beans on toast
One of my English teachers presented beans on toast as a very low-budget thing that only students and such eat to save money. I knew to suspect this, since she said it was similar to how we Finns eat canned tuna with macaroni just because it’s cheap and no one really likes it, and I knew that was not a thing since tuna and macaroni was one of the staples we ate when I was a child and I loved it.

Lumipuna
Lumipuna
13 days ago

This is oddly apropos, but I just finished re-reading the erotic romance novel The Boss by Abigail Barnette (aka Jenny Trout). It was briefly discussed here years ago, as it is a feminist response to the infamous Fifty Shades of Grey clusterfuck. I very much recommend it if you like romance with wealth porn and truly consensual maledom/femsub kinky sex. See the links to the novel and its sequels on the author’s home page:

Trout Nation – Your One Stop Procrastination Shop (jennytrout.com)

The male romantic interest is this ludicrously attractive middle-aged billionaire guy whose very speaking voice makes the female protagonist’s pants wet (presumably, in any of the several languages he knows). He’s also from England, and when Americans bring up his accent, he might wryly joke about the supposed sexiness of his accent:

“So what, are you like, from England or something?”

“No, this is the accent I use when I try to pick up women in airports.”

Last edited 13 days ago by Lumipuna
Elaine The Witch
Elaine The Witch
13 days ago

@Lumipuna

The home page is very interesting and I am intrigued. Is there amount of well written dirty talk in her books? That is usually something I like to know before hand with these kind of books before I buy them.

Dalillama
13 days ago

@Masse_Mysteria
Re: spelling, pronunciation, and accents, there’s an illustrative joke:
A family from Texas moves up North, and enroll their child in school. Come the spelling lesson, the teacher asks who can spell ‘hail’. The Texan kid raises a hand and says “H-e-l-l, hail.”
“No, no, that’s not right, try again.”
“Hail. H-e-l-l. That’s what Daddy says when he hits his thumb with the hammer.”

FlyByKiwi
FlyByKiwi
13 days ago

Wannabikkit, oh noooooooo! They are from the same parent company. I feel betrayed.

Fenton
Fenton
12 days ago

It’s not the worst pick up strategy. Not an honest one, but not wholly ineffective.

I once worked with a number of performers at a tourist attraction. One of them was… well really nothing special in any category but he had just the right sort of Britishness that absolutely mesmerized some of the American ladies.

Lumipuna
Lumipuna
12 days ago

Elaine:

There’s a lot of pillow talk in The Boss, not really “dirty” stuff but more like witty banter on sex and other stuff. Some passionate declarations of lust and/or love, mainly on the man’s part. A lot of serious practical discussions on sex and the relationship.

Much of the sex is fancy and/or passionate vanilla stuff rather than kink. The kink is mainly orgasm delaying and spanking, with some bondage and pinching. There’s not much protocol, and the verbal play tends to be in style of “be a good girl” rather than “you dirty slut”.

Years after first reading The Boss as a freebie, I only recently got around to purchasing the whole Boss series for 10 bucks from SmashWords. Preliminary skimming of the second book reveals there’s a kinky MMF threesome, and some really fancy jewelry gifts (including a diamond-studded platinum session collar) for the protagonist. Overall, there’s a lot of fancy displays of wealth. Personally I really drool at the pattern of gifting platinum + gemstone jewelry. The protagonist is someone who works in fashion journalism and likes/knows how to dress up.

Elaine The Witch
Elaine The Witch
12 days ago

@lumipuna

Sounds good, vanilla kink is just as good to me. I love the “be a good girl” kind of stuff just as much at the “you dirty slut” kind. It’s really a mood depending on which kind I want so to have a book like that with the option is a great thing.

being into kink when your a rape survivor can be kind of messy sometimes. I’ve found books that even though they were well written consensual when they are more into the rougher kind of kink, it has triggered me. And it wasn’t necessary something that was rape related, it was just the male character did something or said something that reminded to much of my rapists and then the whole book ends up in a donate pile.

So it sounds like that will be some good books that will steer away from something like that happening.

Lumipuna
Lumipuna
12 days ago

Elaine:

I’ve found books that even though they were well written consensual when they are more into the rougher kind of kink, it has triggered me. And it wasn’t necessary something that was rape related, it was just the male character did something or said something that reminded to much of my rapists and then the whole book ends up in a donate pile.

Oh. I see it can be difficult to predict, even if you talk with someone who knows the book, and even if they know something about your triggers.

Elaine The Witch
Elaine The Witch
12 days ago

@Lumipuna

Yeah, triggers can be annoying like that cause they can be anything. It doesn’t even have to be anything violent, it can just be a word that’s bad.

Kevin
Kevin
11 days ago

@ Lumipuna

Re: Finnish orthography, regional speech variations.

Reminds me of how Irish and Scottish Gaelic drifted apart – it was at a time of low literacy rates though.

Lumipuna
Lumipuna
11 days ago

Kevin:

Generally speaking, languages are always developing regional variation, and often quite fast, but it doesn’t always result in separate daughter languages. If there’s enough communication between speakers of different dialects, they tend to remain mutually intelligble and may eventually blend back together. Seems that Old Gaelic broke up after spreading from Ireland to Scotland and Isle of Man because these regions were physically somewhat isolated from each other.

Of course, in modern time we have hugely more travel, electronic transfer of speech and of course written communication, so presumably languages aren’t going to break as easily as they used to. If our technological development had stopped at sailships, presumably UK English and US English would be well on their way to becoming different languages.

Singerdog
Singerdog
11 days ago

Although I have been assured that the USA doesn’t have entirely different accents just a few miles apart like the UK does.

Growing up in Baltimore,MD, I could differentiate a dozen neighborhood accents, some only divided by a street. I’m sure it has homogenized over the years.

Kevin
Kevin
9 days ago

@ Lumipuna

You have hit the nail on the head, the formal (and written) forms of Old Gaelic appear to have been limited to the community leaders. Everybody else would have been mostly too busy with survival agriculture. That said, some dialects and languages on the same intelligibility spectrum as English can give a speaker of ‘BBC English’ trouble. I can’t easily follow Scots, (Scotland,) Guller (parts of coastal West Africa, tropical parts of the Americas) Strine (Australia) and Singlish (Singapore) is beyond me.

redmanticore
redmanticore
6 days ago

the ones who asked why would someone brainstorm to get better in the thing one is already good at: well, of course, you would want to. why wouldn´t you?
most people want to get better and better, in whatever they do.. to be proud of their work?
“elinikäinen oppiminen” in Finnish, lifelong learning, as encouraged by our government as a mantra.

also, from your personal circles, do you know has there been any women ever, who faked accent to seem more seductive to someone? I haven’t. I don’t think women need to, that they’ve even thought of it.
or other assertive things. “girl game” is more… passive? among the general population.
even in progressive feminist societies.