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MGTOW misogyny

MGTOW: Constantly complaining about women online is “the equivalent to Christians reading their bible every day”

Apparently MGTOW is a religion now. At least according to one MGTOW Redditor, who suggests that the scriptures of this new religion consist of all the whiny posts about the evils of women that are regularly posted to assorted MGTOW forums.

Let’s let the good Reverend Roflcopt0rz_returns MGTOWsplain it all to us:

"WhY dO yOu gUyS aLwAyS pOsT aBoUt WoMen???!!!1!!" (self.MGTOW)

submitted 20 hours ago by roflcopt0rz_returns

You'll get a lot of wahmen and cucks who complain about us, how we apparently are not going our own way because we "complain" about women.

To which, I ask them this question; why do religious people constantly read their bible or testament or other religious scriptures, even though they've probably read the whole thing several times already?

Same reason why MGTOW posts about divorce rape, false accusations, marriage statistics, etc.

Same reason why people write down their goals that they supposedly should know and refer to their notes constantly (because, you know, it's their life goals).

Sometimes no matter how devout you are, your conviction wavers as life throws bullshit at you from every direction, and you need to remind yourself of the path you're on and why you believe it is right. A Christian will pull out his bible and read a random passage from the book to enforce his conviction. MGTOW's scriptures are real-life stories from men who were destroyed by the system for no reason, case studies, science, and statistics.

MGTOW is the path to happiness, enlightenment, and the truth. However your sex drive is your biggest enemy as it draws you to women and off the path of MGTOW. Reading about divorce rapes, gynocentrism, watching MGTOW videos, and so on, are the equivalent to Christians reading their bible everyday.

Wow, I thought you guys were just whiny woman-haters who couldn’t shut up. I had no idea you were doing the Lord’s work.

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Seth S
Seth S
1 month ago

great. Now, given how 2020 has gone, I half expect them to declare themselves a legit religion so they can get that sweet religious freedom of bigotry that Christians generally seem to have been freely gifted with by our government in the last several years….

Naglfar
Naglfar
1 month ago

your conviction wavers as life throws bullshit at you

You would think that for MGTOWs that would be a time to re-evaluate their lives.

MGTOW is the path to happiness, enlightenment, and the truth.

Weird, they don’t seem all that happy or enlightened. Or to care much for the truth.

I don’t know about MGTOWs, but I think incels most likely meet the requirements to be considered a cult. They oppose independent thought, isolate their members from the world, radicalize members, and worship terrorists. MGTOWs don’t seem quite as culty as incels, but the two groups seem to be converging ever faster as of late.

Crip Dyke
1 month ago

@Naglfar:

You would think that for MGTOWs that would be a time to re-evaluate their lives.

Yeah, but of course that’s not how a person fundamentalists.

weirwoodtreehugger: chief manatee
weirwoodtreehugger: chief manatee
1 month ago

Sometimes, no matter how devout you are, your conviction wavers as life throws bullshit at you from every direction, and you need to remind yourself of the path you’re on and why you believe it is right.

Almost like extreme obsessive misogyny is not innate to men and needs to be constantly reinforced. What if he stayed away from the manosphere and started enjoying life instead of being filled with hate all the time? Wouldn’t that be just horrible?

Demonhype
Demonhype
1 month ago

Wow, and from the headline I thought the mgtow was saying that like it’s a bad thing. Should have known better.

Now the way I always saw it as an atheist is that people with obviously unevidenced beliefs they themselves arent all that convinced of deep down need to constantly reinforce those delicate paper-thin walls around their belief. But I’m sure few mgtows have the level of self-awareness necessary to even realize that.

Kat, ambassador, feminist revolution (in exile)
Kat, ambassador, feminist revolution (in exile)
1 month ago

Wow, I thought you guys were just whiny woman-haters who couldn’t shut up. I had no idea you were doing the Lord’s work.

And here I thought that they were trying to incite hatred against women in an attempt to bring about a sex war.

Kereea
Kereea
1 month ago

Bruh. You ain’t us Jews reading the Torah over and over every year, on a schedule (or three years for some sects). For one, we get a celebration when we get to the end. Plus, we’re supposed to ACTUALLY DEBATE it and its meanings. Y’all being on repeat with no broker for dissent is frankly proof of your iniability to truly think about the concepts you so constantly repeat.

Lollypop
Lollypop
1 month ago

I’m always particularly moved by the Bible passage where Jesus’ post-wall ex gets in touch “just to check in” but Jesus knows she’s trying to beta-bux him, so he humiliates her by saying something like “this gravy train is not stopping at YOUR station, Miss, and lol you’re ugly now” and he just rolls on into his happy MGTOW future.

Alan Robertshaw
1 month ago

@ lollypop

I’m always particularly moved by the Bible passage where Jesus’ post-wall ex gets in touch 

Well Jesus was a chad before it was fashionable. See Revelation 22:13.

darthtimon
1 month ago
Reply to  Naglfar

I’ve yet to stumble across a happy MGTOW.

Perry
Perry
1 month ago

lol actual science and statistics needed, please.

Redsilkphoenix: Jetpack Vixen, Intergalactic Mean
Redsilkphoenix: Jetpack Vixen, Intergalactic Mean
1 month ago

@Darthtimon,

That’s because all the happy MGTOWs are not spending their days on the Internet obsessing about women who don’t want them. They’re out there spending their free time on things they enjoy doing instead. “OMG just look at this radio-controlled airplane I tricked out to look like a TIE fighter! It can do loop-the-loops and corkscrews and EVERYTHING!! Wanna see?” “Yeah, I just got done hiking in Yellowstone National Park last week! Got some gorgeous photos of Old Faithful while I was there too! Wanna see? And next month I’m taking the Appalachian Trail into Canada! Wanna come with me?”

Naglfar
Naglfar
1 month ago

@darthtimon, Redsilkphoenix
Of course, if you ever ask MGTOWs about their hobbies they get very upset. And as for their cooking, the less said about it the better.

There definitely are happy single men out there. Generally the happy ones are the ones who aren’t seething with rage.

Lollypop
Lollypop
1 month ago

@Alan Robertshaw

Haha! Proof if any were needed!

Buttercup Q. Skullpants
Buttercup Q. Skullpants
1 month ago

MGTOW dogma, like scripture, is filled with fantastical stories and conveniently non-falsifiable authoritarian BS that flatters the faithful with promises of unearned greatness. Sounds about right.

MGTOW is the opiate of the messes.

Naglfar
Naglfar
1 month ago

@Buttercup
comment image

Buttercup Q. Skullpants
Buttercup Q. Skullpants
1 month ago

Ninja’d by Naglfar! (I was just about to reword my comment)

Last edited 1 month ago by Buttercup Q. Skullpants
Big Titty Demon
Big Titty Demon
1 month ago

@Buttercup Q Skullpants

MGTOW dogma, like scripture, is filled with fantastical stories and conveniently non-falsifiable authoritarian BS that flatters the faithful with promises of unearned greatness. Sounds about right.

MGTOW is the opiate of the messes.

Wow, ok. I’m sorry you were hurt.

Buttercup Q. Skullpants
Buttercup Q. Skullpants
1 month ago

@Big Titty Demon

I appreciate your sympathy, but we’re going to have to agree to disagree here. The Bible isn’t literally true (though there’s some beautiful allegory) and I don’t want to get into a no true Scotsman debate about the ways in which the right wing have perverted Christianity.

Naglfar
Naglfar
1 month ago

@Buttercup

The Bible isn’t literally true (though there’s some beautiful allegory)

My favorite take on this was from a Maseritic rabbi I knew, who stated that her position was “The Bible is truth…and also some of it might have happened.”

Note: she was referring specifically to the Old Testament, but I imagine the same thing could be said in relation to the NT as well.

Last edited 1 month ago by Naglfar
Big Titty Demon
Big Titty Demon
1 month ago

@Buttercup Q. Skullpants

I appreciate your sympathy, but we’re going to have to agree to disagree here. The Bible isn’t literally true (though there’s some beautiful allegory) and I don’t want to get into a no true Scotsman debate about the ways in which the right wing have perverted Christianity.

Oh, did you mean only right wing perverted Christianity? I thought you were insulting every religious person of every scripture, equating them to MGTOW and saying they were in it for the flattery of unearned greatness. My bad, couldn’t distinguish that nuance. Carry on then.

Buttercup Q. Skullpants
Buttercup Q. Skullpants
1 month ago

@Big Titty Demon

Sorry, that was my bad for highlighting the bathwater and not the baby. I think the Bible is a fascinating mixture of history, poetry, myth, and moral guidance, but it gets egregiously and vocally misused by the usual suspects.

What I meant by “unearned greatness” was the idea, beloved among regressives and easy to find in supporting passages, that certain groups automatically have inborn authority over others, regardless of merit. And that such authority can never be challenged because the source is divine and unassailable. It’s a perfect closed-loop system that’s hard to change.

That’s distinct from the unearned greatness of “because you were born, you are worthy of love and respect, beautiful human being.” Something the MGTOWs will never find in their scriptures, tragically.

weirwoodtreehugger: chief manatee
weirwoodtreehugger: chief manatee
1 month ago

I also find it funny that this guy thinks Christians read the bible a lot. Some do. But a lot of them don’t. Fundies in particular, frequently don’t read or study it on their own, they just listen to selective quotes in church services. My fanatically Christian MAGA uncle has admitted that he does not actually know the bible that well.

Katherine the Adequate
Katherine the Adequate
1 month ago

Took a break in mid-miggie screed to say, “divorce rape” is the stupidest made-up term ever. Now I’ll read more. I enjoy laughing at absurd whining.

Moggie
Moggie
1 month ago

Do Christians really “read a random passage” from the bible to reinforce their conviction? If you truly pick at random, you’re in danger of picking one of the passages where God orders his followers to commit violence, even genocide. Or the bit in Deuteronomy where he gives instructions about how to poop in camp, so that God doesn’t tread in it.

Lainy
Lainy
1 month ago

Christian “i read the bible and listen to scripter to help me through when life gets tough and my faith gets shaken, like when I lost my job, got a bad health diagnoses, or lost a love one suddenly. It helps me process my emotions and gives me hope to keep going forward even when my darkest day arrive”

mgtow * “I read made up hate speech so I don’t develop empathy for a woman and remind myself to hate them even when I want to put my penis in them.”

Viscaria
Viscaria
1 month ago

Same reason why people write down their goals that they supposedly should know and refer to their notes constantly (because, you know, it’s their life goals)

I mean, yeah. Your goal is to hate women. You write down a bunch of stuff about how much you hate women, and you refer to it to remember to hate women some more. We all understand that. The constant whining about women is brought up when MGTOWs try to pretend like you have goals beyond hating women, which you do not. If you’re just admitting that hating women is your whole deal, well then we agree on that (and nothing else).

Big Titty Demon
Big Titty Demon
1 month ago

@Buttercup Q. Skullpants

I think the Bible is a fascinating mixture of history, poetry, myth, and moral guidance, but it gets egregiously and vocally misused by the usual suspects.

I don’t even disagree with you, about the Bible or any other scripture. I only disagree with the original highlighting the bathwater and not the baby. Such highlighting from national sources is the reason I cannot say, “Allahu Akbar”, a sentiment which the majority of Americans of all parties agree with according to Pew Research, without some serious blowback from I’m going to go with anecdotal experience of “way, way too many people”. 70% of Democrats rising to 85% of Republicans have a fairly certain to absolute faith in God, so why could this statement be so offensive? Because of negative religious stereotyping.

I appreciate your clarification in dialogue though. 🙂

What I meant by “unearned greatness” was the idea, beloved among regressives and easy to find in supporting passages, that certain groups automatically have inborn authority over others, regardless of merit. And that such authority can never be challenged because the source is divine and unassailable. It’s a perfect closed-loop system that’s hard to change.

This is a problem with regressives of all creeds, including those of secular creeds only. It’s how eugenics and evo psych came about, the desire to justify what a person already wanted to believe. It is the duty of those within a creed who are not regressive to fight to reform it, and this does and is happening in all major creeds, including religions. The regressives always shout loudly before they go down.

I don’t go around religioning on the kafir mulhids and telling them they’re going to hell (probably partly because I don’t believe that), and I do tell off people for doing that. There’s nothing more irritating than a religious bigot.

Victorious Parasol
Victorious Parasol
1 month ago

I’ve met some Christians (fundie variety) who can quote Bible verses … that they memorized off a card or a bookmark or something else distributed by their church leaders. They can give you the chapter and verse, and bask in the glow of their own righteousness, but they can’t talk about the verse in context because they don’t see the verses as part of a larger work. It’s a nifty way to feel good about yourself and your faith without actually testing it. Or, as Milton once put it:

I cannot praise a fugitive and cloistered virtue, unexercised and unbreathed, that never sallies out and sees her adversary, but slinks out of the race where that immortal garland is to be run for, not without dust and heat.

ETA: Incels and MGTOWs seem to have a lot of fugitive and cloistered virtues.

Last edited 1 month ago by Victorious Parasol
Threp (formerly Shadowplay)
Threp (formerly Shadowplay)
1 month ago

@VP

Incels and MGTOWs seem to have a lot of fugitive and cloistered virtues.

That’s because fundies are ALWAYS the same. Don’t matter what they’re fundieing on about at all – they all behave in exactly the same way.

Last edited 1 month ago by Threp (formerly Shadowplay)
Policy of Madness
Policy of Madness
1 month ago

Evangelicals absolutely do read the Bible quite a bit. It is common for evangelical children to play the “verse lookup” game, where you give book chapter & verse and the first child to find it and read it out wins. Using obscure books for this game teaches children what order the books are in (quick! find the book of Obadiah). It’s not uncommon at all for a really fundamentalist evangelical to do a daily Bible reading, although it’s rarely at random.

When I was a fundamentalist, I read the Bible from front to back as though it were a novel, and while I can’t remember where the book of Obadiah is in order, or what it talks about, let’s not claim that nobody ever reads the context.

Naglfar
Naglfar
1 month ago

@Moggie

Do Christians really “read a random passage” from the bible to reinforce their conviction? If you truly pick at random, you’re in danger of picking one of the passages where God orders his followers to commit violence, even genocide.

That reminds me a bit of Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon. One of the characters is illiterate and chooses names for his children by picking random words from the Bible, which results in him naming his daughter after Pontius Pilate.

There are sites which will send you a random Bible verse daily. I would imagine those are probably filtered, though, so that people don’t just receive a list of which birds not to eat.

Ohlmann
Ohlmann
1 month ago

And there’s also plenty of christian fundies that either don’t read the bible or don’t know the context at all. It don’t take much knowledge of it to stump a lot of them.

Since there isn’t a ton of evangelical near where I am, maybe evangelical specifically know their topics. Alternatively, maybe a fraction of fundies know the bible well, because reading it entirely and knowing the context is a lot of work and not everyone have the focus or will to do that, especially when their “faith” is just a pretext for hate.

An Impish Pepper
An Impish Pepper
1 month ago

I think it depends. The more hardcore/fundamentalist Christians probably do read the Bible a lot, and maybe evangelical families running for multiple generations do as well, but as far as I know, most people who go to evangelical churches aren’t that hardcore about it. It’s one thing to instill Bible-reading habits to a child, and another to try figure out whether or not the average person at an adult congregation knows who John the Baptist is.

Moggie
Moggie
1 month ago

In 2010, Pew Research did a survey of religious knowledge among Americans of all faiths (and none). Old Pharyngula hands may remember the buzz about this: there was a lot of preening about atheists scoring well. They repeated the exercise in 2019. As far as I recall from 2010 (I didn’t take notice of the 2019 survey), evangelical Protestants scored quite highly compared to other Christians, but still not so great. For example:

A slim majority of the public (55%) correctly says that the Golden Rule, “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you,” is not one of the Ten Commandments. More than eight-in-ten Mormons (81%) answer this question correctly, as do roughly two-thirds of white evangelicals (67%) and more than six-in-ten white Catholics (63%), atheists/agnostics (62%) and Jews (62%). By contrast, less than half of white mainline Protestants and black Protestants (49% each) get this question right.

So, a lot of those people pushing for the ten commandments to be displayed at courthouses etc apparently don’t know what they are, even though there are only ten of them.

2010 survey
2019 survey

numerobis
numerobis
1 month ago

Moggie: I guess that explains why they think the 10 commandments need to be posted. You don’t need to put up reminders of things you already know, after all!

Alan Robertshaw
1 month ago

@ moggie

even though there are only ten of them.

Arguably there could be thirteen or more depending on whether you spilt up ‘I am your god‘/’no other gods‘, as some religions do; and whether you parse all the ‘do not covet‘s separately.

Admittedly the idea of a Decalogue started early; but Exodus doesn’t actually state a number; and different churches break them up different ways.

Last edited 1 month ago by Alan Robertshaw
Moggie
Moggie
1 month ago

Actually, it was fifteen.

Alan Robertshaw
1 month ago

@ moggie

Oh great, now you’ve got me watching History of the World clips. Still, makes a change from my usual Youtube fodder of ‘animals bouncing on things’.

Just to be nerdy, there’s some interesting commentary from Jewish lawyers as to whether it’s all the commandments over two tablets; or all the commandments on one tablet, with a copy. I love the idea that god made a counterpart. Still, you’d expect someone omnipotent to have a decent filing system.

Policy of Madness
Policy of Madness
1 month ago

There was a clever study done not long ago which examined religious knowledge vs. support for religious aggression and violence amongst Christians. The survey measured knowledge by listing a bunch of “bible stories” of which 13 were convincing-sounding fakes, and asked respondents how familiar they were with the stories on the list. Someone who really knows their stuff would be familiar with the real stories and unfamiliar with the fakes, and someone who was inflating their knowledge would claim to be equally familiar with the fakes. It turned out that people who have more knowledge of the Bible are less likely to support religious violence.

https://friendlyatheist.patheos.com/2020/06/09/believers-who-overestimate-their-religious-knowledge-like-violence-the-most/

Alan Robertshaw
1 month ago

@ POM

convincing-sounding fakes, 

Sort of related; but this reminds me of Trump’s cognitive ability test.

I’ve mentioned in the past that I did a course where we took some of the tests used in court proceedings. That’s the occasion I scored 68 on the WAIS-III IQ test.

But anyway, I did a cognitive ability one too. Some of the questions seemed pretty easy. But afterwards it was explained to us that those questions are put in to spot fakers.

People will sometimes attempt to score badly so as to be found not competent to stand trial or get out of contracts through lack of capacity. So they put in questions that even someone with severe brain damage would still get right.

I can’t help but think of that when Trump was bragging about how well he’d done.

Lumipuna
Lumipuna
1 month ago

Ask Trump some Bible trivia, like “What was the name of the father of Jacob’s twelve sons?”

Naglfar
Naglfar
1 month ago

@Alan Robertshaw

Just to be nerdy, there’s some interesting commentary from Jewish lawyers as to whether it’s all the commandments over two tablets; or all the commandments on one tablet, with a copy. I love the idea that god made a counterpart. Still, you’d expect someone omnipotent to have a decent filing system.

FWIW, most of the depictions I’ve seen in Jewish religious contexts (i.e. artwork, synagogues, etc) show it as two tablets. But you know what they say about Jewish law: put two rabbis on a desert island and you’ll get three different interpretations.

I think the main thing Moses should have been glad about is that God didn’t give him all 613 laws at once. That would have been a lot of tablets to carry. And of course I must resurrect the old joke: Moses gets down from Mt Sinai and tells the people “the good news is I got him down to 10. The bad news is, adultery is still in.”

Re: The Golden Rule
What I would imagine fewer would have known is that the original phrasing (and that which I’ve mostly heard in Jewish contexts) is the inverse of the more common phrasing. It seems to originally have been “do not do unto others as you would not have them do unto you.” I personally prefer that version, but that might just be because I’ve seen it more.

@Lumipuna

Ask Trump some Bible trivia, like “What was the name of the father of Jacob’s twelve sons?”

My favorite Bible trivia question is to ask someone to answer as quickly as they can, “how many animals did Moses bring on the ark?”

Last edited 1 month ago by Naglfar
Alan Robertshaw
1 month ago

@ naglfar

To quote Hillel when he was asked to teach someone the Torah:

That which is despicable to you, do not do to your fellow. This is the whole Torah. The rest is commentary.

Last edited 1 month ago by Alan Robertshaw
Mrs Morley
Mrs Morley
1 month ago

@Naglfar: Hillel said that which is hateful to you, do not do to others, but Akiva (I think) said love your neighbor as yourself.

My point being that we Jews come up with both positive and negative formulations.

Mrs Morley
Mrs Morley
1 month ago

@Alan Robertshaw
And the last bit “go now and learn” (or study).

Point being that even if the injunction is apparently simple, you have to figure out what it means. (An odd example: I don’t like sweets. That doesn’t mean I shouldn’t offer dessert to guests. Thus it’s important that I figure out hospitality rather than assuming everyone has my tastes. That’s studying the commentary. )

Buttercup Q. Skullpants
Buttercup Q. Skullpants
1 month ago

I’m trying to imagine commentary on MGTOW scripture. There really aren’t a lot of different ways to interpret “behold my undercooked chicken, seasoned with the tears of harpies.”

Naglfar
Naglfar
1 month ago

@Alan Robertshaw
Hillel also had sandwich recipes.

@Mrs Morley
I’ve seen it both ways as well, I’m just more familiar with Hillel’s version, of which I’ve seen varying translations. And Hillel precedes Akiva.

@Buttercup
Probably various commentators arguing about whether it’s okay to be married as an MGTOW or which chicken recipe to use to make dry chicken while arguing with women online. In other words, a Reddit comments section.

Last edited 1 month ago by Naglfar
Alan Robertshaw
1 month ago

@ naglfar

Hillel also had sandwich recipes.

I always feel a bit guilty when I eat passover matzah crackers just as ordinary crackers; like I’m being sacrilegious or something. But I just really like the Rakusen ones. And they’re vegan and made in Yorkshire.

@ mrs morley

Yeah. I love when there’s something really simple to live by; but also has the potential for a lifetime of study. I find it very Zen.

Threp (formerly Shadowplay)
Threp (formerly Shadowplay)
1 month ago

@Moggie

Actually, it was fifteen.

(for some reason vid or image you posted isn’t showing for me.)

Protestants get a wee bit peeved (some, anyways) that we Catholics have a different set of Commandments from them. Had one guy calling me a heretic over that … 😛