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“Getting raped is a product of sexual privilege,” declares Blackpilled Twitterer

Rape is a kind of robbery, according to @CCide

By David Futrelle

Twitter’s @CCide is a “blackpilled” incel-sympathizer who describes himself in his Twitter bio as someone “Enforcing Monogamy, Unhorsing Sodomy, Endorsing Patriarchy.” He’s got close to 4500 Twitter followers, among them Rollo Tomassi, an internet-famous Red Piller responsible for the “Rational Male” books and website. He clearly sees himself as a philosopher of the so-called Black Pill.

He’s also got perhaps the worst take on rape I’ve ever seen:

CC isn’t the first to portray rape as a form of property theft; indeed, that was once the standard take on the subject. But he’s the first I can recall seeing who describes being raped as a sign of sexual privilege — implying that if you’re sexually desirable enough to be raped you’re inherently more privileged than sexually frustrated incels, whom no one desires and, presumably, no one rapes.

Meanwhile, he sees “friendzoning” as a crime against men as serious as rape.

Somehow CC also seems to believe that all sex is rape because women are not developed enough to legally consent:

Suffice it to say his views on sex generally are pretty fucked-up.

For more on this last bit, and why it’s a bunch of hooey, see here and here.

He’s serious about that “enforcing monogamy” thing, and thinks arranged marriages are great.

Keeping true to his reactionary self, he rails against welfare as a form of “economic cuckoldry” and worse.

I guess we’d do better just to let children of poor sinlge mothers starve.

CC is convinced that gay men and trans women are really incels in disguise, driven to change their sexualities and gender identification because they’ve been rejected by women.

It should probably go without saying that he’s also racist as fuck.

Also, he thinks the only reason women care about George Floyd is that he was tall.

CC may be many things, but one thing he is clearly not is modest. He thinks that what he’s tweeting will go down in history, and not just as the sometimes amusing, sometimes infuriating tweets of a delusional nobody.

Sorry, dude, but from where I sit you’re just another shitty dude with shitty ideas, and there’s no shortage of them these days.

Send tips to dfutrelle at gmail dot com.

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Naglfar
Naglfar
3 months ago

I remember the days, wandering my balcony pondering why I had to fall in love with the children of familial enemies. Wherefore?

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 months ago

@ snowberry

we often see teenagers about that age playing the roles.

I’d love to have seen the original where all the roles were played by 30-something blokes.

Snowberry
Snowberry
3 months ago

R&J Addenum: The reason why I doubt Juliet being a bit short of 13 was a metaphor is due to the context of the play and the era it was set in. The Capulets are talking about marrying off their daughter; however, by tradition, girls from noble families become a “Lady-in-Waiting” at age 13, where they’re expected to become an apprentice/servant/student of sorts to an older noblewoman. At any point after that, they can be married off, at which time they become a “Lady”. While generally they had at least a few years experience as a Lady-in-Waiting first, not being married until around 16-20, it wasn’t completely unheard of to be married right away. Lord Capulet thinks marrying her off ASAP for political convenience is the way to go, while Lady Capulet appears to be concerned about her future and is asking for him to wait on that.

Rabid Rabbit
Rabid Rabbit
3 months ago

R+J: She’s thirteen, but will turn fourteen at Lammas. The Nurse states it pretty explicitly. Even her father at first thinks they should wait a bit for the actual marriage to take place.

@Alan: There’s always the 1936 George Cukor film, where they’re all in their forties.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 months ago

@ rabid rabbit

the 1936 George Cukor film

“But that woman, is a woman!

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 months ago

Speaking of Shakespeare (which we were) and archeology (which we weren’t), I really like this.

https://arstechnica.com/science/2020/06/archaeologists-may-have-found-site-of-the-red-lion-londons-first-playhouse/

Dalillama
Dalillama
3 months ago

@Alan

I’d love to have seen the original where all the roles were played by 30-something blokes.

That’s not at all accurate. All the boys were played by blokes in their 30s, but the girls were played by their (sometimes pre) teenage sons/apprentices.

Naglfar
Naglfar
3 months ago

@Dalillama
Still would have been interesting to see IMO.

Snowberry
Snowberry
3 months ago

You want to see something wild, there’s “As you like it”. One of the characters is a woman playing a man playing a woman. Considering that actors in Shakespeare’s day were all male, a truly authentic performance would be a man playing a woman playing a man playing a woman. It’s drag cubed. 🙃

Mrs Morley
Mrs Morley
3 months ago

Re R&J- Juliet’s mother says that she was Juliet’s age when she became a mother. So she’s 26.

Which might explain why she likes County Paris so much.

Lumipuna
Lumipuna
3 months ago

The whole “Romeo and Juliet laws” phrase is based around the idea that the two of them were something like 15-17.

Or perhaps rather, them being just a popular example of a generally young couple whose love is criminalized by the establishment for no good reason.

Though I do think the term is kinda tacky.

dust bunny
dust bunny
3 months ago

oh look, it’s the 17-to-1 thing again. i guess it’s too much to expect dim misogynists to figure out it isn’t true, since the somewhat less openly misogynistic scientists and media people who popularised the idea won’t come out and say so either.

Amtep
Amtep
3 months ago

The funny thing about the GENOCIDE is that according to their own worldview, Chad must be their biological father. (Imagine the Darth Vader moment). So why don’t they share Chad’s evolutionarily superior wrist circumference?

Del
Del
3 months ago

You want to see something wild, there’s “As you like it”. One of the characters is a woman playing a man playing a woman. Considering that actors in Shakespeare’s day were all male, a truly authentic performance would be a man playing a woman playing a man playing a woman. It’s drag cubed. 🙃

In the grim Shakespearean future, actors will be forced to vogue in iambic pentameter for the amusement of the audience in THE DRAG CUBE

*cough* sorry, going back to lurk mode now

Chris O
Chris O
3 months ago

@Lizard People Operative: the incel philosophy is nothing BUT bugs.

Talonknife
Talonknife
3 months ago

@Dalillama

That’s not at all accurate. All the boys were played by blokes in their 30s, but the girls were played by their (sometimes pre) teenage sons/apprentices.

This also isn’t entirely accurate. Sometimes adult men did play the female roles. In Macbeth, when Macbeth and Banquo first meet the witches, there’s a line that goes some thing like “You should be women, and yet you have beards” (paraphrasing that because I can’t remember exactly.) Some of the female roles were still played by adult men and Shakespeare specifically wrote that line in to explain it away.

John
John
3 months ago

Shakespeare lowered Juliet’s age from the source material. In the original Italian novella, she is 18. Why he shaved four or five years off her (depending on how you interpret “She hath not seen the change of fourteen years, Let two more summers wither in their pride, Ere we may think her ripe to be a bride) is open to debate, but one theory is that as the part needed to be played by a boy, he wrote her young so her apparent ago would match that of the actor. Generally, the young women were portrayed by pre-adolescent boys, and the older women were played by men a la Monty Python. Another theory is that it was an English stereotype of Italians that they were hot-blooded and came into their passions early.

Tohka
Tohka
3 months ago

I hated browsing CCs account. Alot of retweeting from other accounts that endorsed burning women alive like witches for not liking the nuclear family set up, not wanting chidlren,and that democrats are evil and ruining the country too. Theres always a connection between these misogynists and conservative conspiracy theorist republicans. Like they truly believe women are brainwashed by feminism into wanting to be recognized as a whole human being and not just a walking womb that should be reproducing all the time despite our overpopulation.

Katherine the Adequate
Katherine the Adequate
3 months ago

Not gonna browse Ccide’s account, because trash isn’t my thing. I hope his warped world view doesn’t manifest into actual harmful acts against people. That’s really all I can do.