Categories
empathy deficit entitled babies gender policing homophobia irony alert lgtbq macho macho men masculinity misogyny

In the battle betwen John Wayne and Mr. Rogers it’s the gentler soul who’s winning

By David Futrelle

Mr. Rogers, who passed away in 2003, is having a strange but heartwarming posthumous comeback. A kindly father figure for generations of preschoolers, Rogers was recently the subject of a documentary that made grownups weep. Tom Hanks is playing him in a forthcoming feature film. He was even hailed as something of a bisexual icon after old comments of his acknowledging he was attracted to men as well as women resurfaced.

Some people aren’t so happy about Mr. Rogers’ return to the spotlight — among them Daily Wire video host Andrew Klavan, who recently denounced Rogers as the poster boy for the sort of “metrosexual wimpiness” that Klavan thinks is destroying masculinity. It’s John Wayne, not Fred Rogers, who Klavan thinks is the true epitome of manliness.

Now, Mr. Rogers was no metrosexual; his fashion sense was almost defiantly bland, and he wore a variation on the same outfit every single day, as Klavan is certainly aware. Klavan calls him a “metrosexual” only because he knows that he would be pilloried for saying the word I suspect he really wants to use: a three-letter slur starting with “f” and ending with “g.”

Klavan would rather that the boys and men of America look up to a sort of Rambo-ized version of Jesus Christ himself — whom Klavan describes as

a steely man of integrity who was willing to sacrifice everything to say what needed to be said, and do what needed to be done.

Among regular humans, it was John Wayne who apparently came closest to Klavan’s platonic ideal of the “real man.” The world is a dangerous place, Klavam warns, and we’re in desperate need of “tough” men with guns to protect us all from evil. “If you really want to have a beautiful day in the neighborhood,” Klavan declares, “call John Wayne and tell him to bring his guns.”

I don’t know about you, but I’d feel a lot more comfortable in a neighborhood full of Mr. Rogerses than I would in one patrolled continually by John Wayne wannabes with assault rifles. We don’t need protection by these sorts of guys; we need protection from them.

Indeed, the sort of toxic masculinity that Klavan celebrates is one of the greatest dangers the world faces today. Here in the US, our terrible, illegitimate president is the worst sort of toxic male, a perpetual overcompensator whose own masculinity is so fragile and broken than he pardons literal war criminals to make himself look tough to the troops and retweets photoshopped pictures of himself reimagined as Rocky.

It’s no wonder so many people are holding up Mr. Rogers’ gentle masculinity as a sort of antidote to this gross macho bullshit. Mr. Rogers was the father who didn’t get angry, the one who returned home every day at the same time, replacing his jacket with a cardigan and his dress shoes with sneakers in a ritual designed to be reassuring to small children in its everyday sameness.

Mr. Rogers Neighborhood was easy to mock, and I did my share of mocking once I passed out of its core demographic. But when I was a very little kid I was enthralled — reassured by Mr. Rogers, delighted by Henrietta Pussycat and her habit of working “meow meow” into everything she said, entranced by Lady Aberlin. (I think I had a little crush.)

I have no desire to go back and watch the show now; I’d be the fist to admit that, as Klavan sneers, it’s “intolerable” to watch “unless you happen to be a 3-year-old.” It’s too earnest, too wholesome for my cynical middle-aged self.

But when I was a little kid I watched it religiously — and I’d like to think that for all of my cynical crankiness a little of Mr. Rogers’ gentleness rubbed off on me.

Send tips to dfutrelle at gmail dot com.

We Hunted the Mammoth relies entirely on readers like you for its survival. If you appreciate our work, please send a few bucks our way! Thanks!

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

123 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
ABM
ABM
1 year ago

We actually got our Ninja Turtles and Batman obsessed SK age son to watch some Mr. Rogers! Hopefully he absorbed something nourishing from it…

Mr Rogers was truly and loudly unashamed to be kind, nurturing and positive. No wonder certain people hate him 🙁

Joekster
Joekster
1 year ago

Also, Fred Rogers was an ordained Presbyterian minister. I think he had a better knowledge of who Jesus was (And is, IMO) than either the Duke or some broflake on the daily wire.

Amy E
Amy E
1 year ago

When you’re surrounded by “tough” guys as a kid, you badly need someone like Mr. Rogers in your life. I can personally attest to that.

Naglfar
Naglfar
1 year ago

John Wayne was also well established as a racist asshat and awful person to be around. Fred Rogers all the way.

I had no idea Fred was bi, but I did know that Officer Clemmons was gay.

I don’t know about you, but I’d feel a lot more comfortable in a neighborhood full of Mr. Rogerses than I would in one patrolled continually by John Wayne wannabes with assault rifles.

We have a name for a neighborhood patrolled by jackbooted men with guns. We call it a fascist police state. I much prefer Mr. Roger’s neighborhood.

Conservatives love to talk about how much they love police states, but I wonder how fast their opinions would change if the ideology of the people in power was a left wing one. I can’t imagine they’d enjoy communism that much.

Allandrel
Allandrel
1 year ago

@Joekster

Also, Fred Rogers was an ordained Presbyterian minister. I think he had a better knowledge of who Jesus was (And is, IMO) than either the Duke or some broflake on the daily wire.

One of the things that I love most about Fred Rogers is that he was deeply religious but never mentioned it on his show, because he knew that some of his audience would not share his faith and he wanted to be there for everyone.

Moon Custafer
1 year ago

John Wayne sat out WWII.

I sometimes like to watch this early clip of Mr. Rogers talking to a cat, because it’s just kind of soothing (and also even Fred Rogers couldn’t help saying “you’re a kitty” when in proximity to a cat):
https://youtu.be/mT5NeN0RCsc

Naglfar
Naglfar
1 year ago

@Moon Custafer

John Wayne sat out WWII.

Another chicken hawk? I didn’t know that, but I’m not surprised. Most Republicans were/are chicken hawks.

even Fred Rogers couldn’t help saying “you’re a kitty” when in proximity to a cat

Well, he was only human.

jsrtheta
jsrtheta
1 year ago

All my life I heard about what a “real man” and “tough guy” John Wayne was, how he embodied masculinity.

In truth, Wayne stayed home during WWII while other, less macho, guys went to war. Men like Jimmy Stewart and George McGovern. Wayne had multiple opportunities to join the fight, and never took them.

I never liked John Wayne. My distaste has only grown over the years.

Nequam
Nequam
1 year ago

It’s funny– even as a kid I don’t remember avidly watching Mr. Rogers (I wouldn’t be surprised if I had it on as background noise but read during it as opposed to the more attention-grabbing Sesame Street and Electric Company) but the more I read about Fred Rogers the more I like him.

John Wayne I can take or leave– and mostly leave.

weirwoodtreehugger: chief manatee

Thanks for the clip Moon Custafer, it was so cute!

In truth, Wayne stayed home during WWII while other, less macho, guys went to war. Men like Jimmy Stewart and George McGovern.

My maternal grandfather was a lot more like Fred Rogers than John Wayne and he went to WWII. He never, ever talked about it though. Because he was a gentle soul and the experience traumatized him. Especially since he lost a brother. Fuck anyone who fetishizes war and violence. War damages everyone touched by it. And as I said on Twitter earlier in response to this story, it takes more courage in a culture that rewards cruelty and greed to be kind than it does to be a toxic gun loving asshole.

Anyway, I’m a grumpy, horror movie loving atheist, but I’ll always have a soft spot for Mr. Rogers. I wept through the whole documentary, pretty much. In fact, I’m on my period and have had a couple of glasses of wine. I think I’m primed to watch it again!

Talonknife
Talonknife
1 year ago

One of my favorite Fred Rogers facts is that he actually belonged to the same fraternity that I do, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia. I’m considering seeing if I can organize a trip for my fraternity brothers to all go see the Mister Rogers film together.

Dormousing_it
Dormousing_it
1 year ago

Fred Rogers was the speaker at my college graduation. Once he had finished speaking, the Dean remarked, “Well, you guys sure quieted down fast, once Mr. Rogers started talking.”. Maybe you had to have been there, to find it funny.

Echoing what others have said, about John Wayne. Also, he walked like he perpetually had a load in his pants. Sooooo macho.

Ooglyboggles
Ooglyboggles
1 year ago

I miss Mr. Rogers. He did good in this world.

BBBB
BBBB
1 year ago

Conservatives prefer fake heroes to real heroes.

Buttercup Q. Skullpants
Buttercup Q. Skullpants
1 year ago

Mr. Rogers was the father who didn’t get angry, the one who returned home every day at the same time, replacing his jacket with a cardigan and his dress shoes with sneakers in a ritual designed to be reassuring to small children in its everyday sameness.

Mr. Rogers was the dad I never had. He was the dad who came home, put on a zip cardigan and sneakers, and wanted to play with me. The dad who came down to my level and indulged my endless questions. The dad who told me, “Your feelings matter. You matter.” I still cry every time I see him. How many thousands of lonely kids did he comfort?

Among all the other shows aimed at teaching kids their ABCs, his show was the only show to address emotional intelligence. He helped kids conquer the terrors and anxieties of childhood with nothing more than gentleness. He confronted big issues like bigotry, bullying, illness, death, and divorce head on, armed only with honesty. Talk about courage.

John Wayne, on the other hand, appeals to men who are smaller than they think they deserve to be. He’s a completely hollow icon. Everything about his screen persona is fake. Cowboy? He could barely ride a horse. Patriot? He never served. So much of toxic masculinity involves bullshitting people.

The right gets its idea of manliness from John Wayne movies: that kindness is weakness, that speech contaminates virility, that vigilante violence is necessary because the state is too weak to dispense justice. And so you get bullying, anger, and straitjacketed emotions. The sort of problems that only Mr. Rogers can solve.

TacticalProgressive
TacticalProgressive
1 year ago

I grew up loving Mr.Rogers as the mentor who saw the world as his beloved neighborhood and all humanity were neighbors to look out for.

I have my flaws and failings; but I always wanted to try and be the sort of person that Mr.Rogers encouraged kids to be when they grow up… and I still do. To bring healing in the many different neighborhoods in the world, especially now more than ever. And it broke my heart knowing that such a earnestly good, kind, gentle, accepting and loving man was taken by of stomach cancer. No person deserves to meet such a slow and painful death, least of all Mr.Rogers.

We need Mr.Rogers again, or least someone cut from the same cloth as him… because we need more people like him… because the world has become a much sadder, meaner, and scary place without him.

I miss Mr.Rogers even as a 30 year old going on 31. But i keep all the lessons and words he shared close to my heart. And in my eyes; we need more men in the world like Mr.Rogers, not war-hawking, bullies, bigots and ilk like John Wayne and those who wish to idolize him and propagate his hyper-masculine toxic bs.

I will always be your neighbor, Mr.Rogers…

galanx
galanx
1 year ago

The excuse given for John Wayne is that he really wanted to go to war, but goshdarn, that studio had him on contract and wouldn’t let him. Which didn’t stop Jimmy Stewart. And I Imagine if a patriotic symbol like Wayne wanted to go, a studio wouldn’t stand up and publicly stop him in the midst of the Great Patriotic War.

Moggie
Moggie
1 year ago

Don’t forget that John Wayne was an enthusiastic supporter of the Hollywood blacklist, and remained unrepentant about this for many years after. Scumbag.

As a child, I was very sensitive to fakeness in adults, and I remember detesting Wayne for his performative masculinity. He was frequently held up as a male role model, and I always wondered “why would anyone want to be like that?”

GrumpyOld SocialJusticeMangina
GrumpyOld SocialJusticeMangina
1 year ago

One of the classic chasms in American culture is whether you take Fred Rogers or John Wayne as your masculine role model. Fred made “soy boys” look like the real men.

Surplus to Requirements, Observer of the Vast Blight-Wing Enstupidation
Surplus to Requirements, Observer of the Vast Blight-Wing Enstupidation
1 year ago

OT, but this article is at-least-tangential to multiple topics of recurrent interest around here: Nazi “race science”, fat-shaming, hiring biases …

https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2018/11/body-stereotypes-personality-debunked-eugenics/575041/

Penny Psmith
Penny Psmith
1 year ago

I didn’t grow up with Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood; we didn’t have it here, and I only learned about that show as an adult.
My husband, however, did grow up with it – and I think Fred Rogers must have at least some credit for his emotional intelligence.

Kevin
Kevin
1 year ago

@ Dormousing – it

The way people walk. Splash damage. Please be careful.

Victorious Parasol
1 year ago

My favorite Mister Rogers moment (at the moment, anyway):

@Moon Custafer

I can easily imagine Mr. Parasol reacting that way to a kitty. I married a good man.

@Talonknife

Hail, Sinfonia! I was Phi Beta as an undergrad, and our chapter hung out with the Sinfonian chapter ALL the time – I still have fond memories of joining those guys for a round of “Keep America Singing” every week before going to our respective meetings.

Buttercup Q. Skullpants
Buttercup Q. Skullpants
1 year ago

Reagan also projected the same sense of fakeness. The 1980 election marketed him as a rugged antidote to the cardiganed, tree hugging, solar-panel-installing Jimmy Carter. (Carter served in the Navy during WWII, while Reagan was assigned to “motivation on the home front”, ie making movies about the war). Reagan helped plant the crop of right wing callousness we’re reaping now.

As far as picking a role model goes, here’s an easy quiz. Which one of these are you more likely to experience in your day-to-day life?

A. Heartbreak
B. Disappointment
C. Low self esteem
D. Marauding gangs of immigrants invading your neighborhood with bushel baskets of drugs

Even if it were D, I’d still pick Mr. Rogers.

Naglfar
Naglfar
1 year ago

@Buttercup Q. Skullpants

The right gets its idea of manliness from John Wayne movies: that kindness is weakness, that speech contaminates virility, that vigilante violence is necessary because the state is too weak to dispense justice. And so you get bullying, anger, and straitjacketed emotions. The sort of problems that only Mr. Rogers can solve.

You can see the roots of the alt right in those ideas. When people argue with them, they call those people “snowflakes” or mock the idea of feelings and emotions. Or they oppose any sort of kindness for its own sake. And they love violence.

@GOSJM

One of the classic chasms in American culture is whether you take Fred Rogers or John Wayne as your masculine role model. Fred made “soy boys” look like the real men.

I’ve never paid too much attention to role models in the world, but if I had to pick one of these people to base my ethos around, it would definitely be Rogers. John Wayne was a racist, he abused the people around him, and he was in no way heroic.
I find that often the men who take up toxic masculinity as an exterior are those who are very insecure about their own masculinity, so they pursue it to a toxic degree to feel better about themselves.

Allandrel
Allandrel
1 year ago

I find it very telling that many conservatives love to quote the John Wayne line “Never apologize, it’s a sign of weakness” because that line is so revealing in ways that they don’t realize.

First off, apologizing is not a sign of weakness, but strength. It represents a willingness to examine your actions for fault, rather than insist that you never make mistakes. It is necessary for growth.

Second, the line reveals a core fear of being seen as weak, and behaving in unhealthy ways to avoid being seen as weak. That sounds to me far more like a sign of weakness than apologizing.

Ivory Bill Woodpecker
Ivory Bill Woodpecker
1 year ago

Technical point: Jimmy Carter served in the Navy after WW2; he was still studying at the Naval Academy when WW2 ended.

Katamount
1 year ago

It’s part of what gives me hope for the future is that folks of the generation that grew up with Fred Rogers recognize just how fundamental he was as an example of kindness and gentleness. Exactly the things that Charlie Chaplin demanded we need more of in his Great Dictator speech.

But since we’re talking about kids shows… I think it was maybe a year ago I wanted to look up some of the ones that I grew up with on public television back in the day. It’s one of the few things I’m grateful for YouTube existing, because practically any obscure thing that appeared on television has been uploaded.

Of course, there was always Sesame Street, which was there and broadly forgettable as far as individual skits went, but there were a couple that stuck in my brain.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wqJjrtDFGpI

I showed this to my folks once and they were blown away by all the celebrities and how young they were.

But that was American stuff. Canadian kids had other… stranger things to watch.

Like Jeremy… or Barnaby… or Colargol… or whatever this stop-motion bear’s name was:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZrpGooi8GI&list=PL509Flg87ytUwCvYERz9WsonemAB-Gbc6

That was my morning thing on TVO.

There there was the nightmare fuel puppets of Today’s Special:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_cxLfIs051c

And who could forget alien robot Zardip and his endless search for healthy wellness?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xT-GwnETTbA

Polka Dot Door. Report Canada. Sharon, Lois and Bram. And of course, when we got to French class in 4th grade came the legendary Telefrancais.

Naglfar
Naglfar
1 year ago

@Allandrel
Conservatives are weak. That’s the only explanation. They use fascism as a cover.

Naglfar
Naglfar
1 year ago

(Meant to add but missed edit window)
Fascism is an ideology for the cowardly. It’s saying “we’re the best, but we’re also victims, so let’s whine about our fake victimhood and use it as an excuse to hurt others.”
It’s also a self-contradictory ideology. If you are the “master race,” why are other groups able to usurp you? Wouldn’t that make them the “master race”? Or, maybe, just maybe, the whole “master race” concept is BS, like the concept of race as a whole?

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
1 year ago

Speaking of gentle (and any excuse to slip stuff like this in); it might be a terrible time to be human in the States; but it seems to be getting slightly better for animals.

https://aldf.org/article/court-rejects-attempt-to-block-california-law-banning-cruelest-farming-practices/

Although obviously animal welfare is no substitute for animal rights.

Otrame
Otrame
1 year ago

When my eldest was about the right age for Mr. Rogers and he sat there, transfixed, I told my husband at the time that my son loved him, but that I could just barely stand to have him on.

I’ll never forget what my ex said: “He’s not trying to be your friend.”

That changed my perspective. Once I looked at it that way I loved his show.

Except Opera Day. Couldn’t stand Opera Day.

He was a great man.

LG
LG
1 year ago

“I have no desire to go back and watch the show now; I’d be the fist to admit that, as Klavan sneers, it’s “intolerable” to watch “unless you happen to be a 3-year-old.” It’s too earnest, too wholesome for my cynical middle-aged self.”

Okay, but…have you tried?

I watch it a lot. It helped me tremendously when my depression and anxiety were so bad they almost killed me. Now, I watch an episode every day while doing yoga. I still learn a ton. I still laugh and cry a lot.

I think it’s a big problem that things are “too” earnest and wholesome for us now and that such feelings are “intolerable.”

Michael Busch
Michael Busch
1 year ago

Mr. Rogers was the father who didn’t get angry

I recently learned about one occasion when Fred Rogers got very angry; but it was not on his show and it wasn’t directed at children. It was directed at the Ku Klux Klan.

In 1990; three men associated with the KKK had someone impersonate Rogers’ voice and record a series of tapes which they would play for children, to try to indoctrinate them with heterosexism & white-supremacist racism.

A civil rights group learned about it. They told Rogers; who was rightly extremely angry. He immediately sued the KKK & the individual men concerned and shut down that entire operation: https://www.nytimes.com/1990/10/21/us/3-to-stop-racist-talks-in-mister-rogers-tone.html .

Jenora Feuer
Jenora Feuer
1 year ago

I remember Mister Rogers all right. The more you delve into the backstory and psychology, the more you realize that he understood exactly what he was doing. And my mother was a kindergarten teacher: ‘play nice’ was a big part of my upbringing.

@Katamount:
I didn’t grow up in Ontario, so no TVO, but I still grew up with Mister Dressup and The Friendly Giant. And, of course, Fred Rogers and Ernie Coombs (Mister Dressup) had worked together when they were both starting out, Coombs having been one of the earlier puppeteers.

Granted, after moving to Ontario, I would discover things like Nic et Pic…

Moon Custafer
1 year ago

Buttercup Q. Skullpants, Ivory Bill Woodpecker:

Carter was one of the Navy nuclear technicians who helped stop the reactor meltdown at Chalk River in 1952. They had to monitor him for radiation for months afterwards.

@Katamount:
Aw, I loved that bear as a kid! There were no tie-in toys (because it was a European-made series that was already decades old at that point), so I would try to make models of him from styrofoam.
The Friendly Giant was pretty good. When I look it up on YouTube, the main thing I notice is how much live Baroque, Classical and Jazz music was included. Bob Homme must have had a lot of musician friends.

Dalillama
Dalillama
1 year ago

Re: Wayne’s walk, he was trying to imitate the bowlegged swagger common to people who spend most of their lives on horseback. And also wear high-heeled boots, something the non-equestrian Wayne wasn’t fully accustomed to.

Katamount
1 year ago

@Jenora Feuer

Mr. Dressup I remember quite well. The Friendly Giant was a bit before my time, but my parents remember him.

I also wanted to mention a couple other children’s entertainers that are still going today. One is Fred Penner, who I adored as a kid likely do to the passing resemblance to my father (short brown hair and a beard). Penner got his start on Sharon, Lois and Bram’s The Elephant Show with his version of “The Cat Came Back”, but then got his own show Fred Penner’s Place, which lasted from 1985-1997. At 73 years of age, Penner still does live shows and indicated he has no plans of retiring.

Another children’s entertainer who got his start on The Elephant Show was Eric Nagler, who was kinda the resident multi-instrumentalist. He was also an American ex-pat, who came to Canada as a conscientious objector to the Vietnam War and put down roots in Toronto. What made Nagler memorable to me was his energy, his big thick beard and his improvised instruments, some of which were rather unique. I recall having this old VHS tape when I was little:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U-rHk6HOjjY

Playing the Star Wars theme on a musical saw always stuck in my brain. Also his cornstalk violin.

Paireon
Paireon
1 year ago

This may seem silly, but I date the time when John Wayne lost all credibility to me on any and all levels to that time I saw The Conqueror on TV way back when. He played Genghis Khan in that movie. Let that one sink in for a bit. That said, precious little of what I learned about him afterwards did anything to mitigate my judgement then – if anything, it showed I hadn’t been quite harsh enough.

Also, how much of a clumsy oaf do you have to be not to be able to ride a horse when you’re a Hollywood actor, who tends to play cowboys no less!? I’ve got motor problems and I can manage a few minutes of galloping (or could, at least – haven’t done any horseback riding in almost two decades. Fuck I’m getting old.*). Methinks it was for other reasons, probably (wink, wink).

But yeah, if you think John Wayne (callous, crass, arrogant, casually racist and sexist, demeaning to those with differing views, fast to claim a romanticized “warrior” mythologized ethos (watch a western, any western, except maybe Brokeback Mountain) while quite consciously dodging THE war of his time (to be clear, I’m not necessarily against draft dodging, it’s just that claiming to be a tough guy who can fight and shoot with the best of ’em and that war is a good thing when other people fight it you’re a giant hypocritical cowardly douche), and above all else, FAKE because otherwise even the shallow people he associated with would have seen him for the paper tiger he was) is a better example of what it is to be a Man than Fred Rogers, then you got problems.

* – I reached 40 this year.

Naglfar
Naglfar
1 year ago

Re: children’s entertainers
IIRC Raffi is still performing occasionally. He’s best known for his song “Baby Beluga.” He’s also Canadian (but born in Egypt).

@Paireon

I used to ride horses, and I would love to get back into it if I had the time and money to have a horse, and I’d say that you could train a person to ride one better than Wayne in a few hours. FFS, if your cowboy can’t ride a horse, find a new cowboy.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
1 year ago

Permission to self promote….

comment image

https://advocates-for-animals.com/blog/242

Surplus to Requirements, Observer of the Vast Blight-Wing Enstupidation
Surplus to Requirements, Observer of the Vast Blight-Wing Enstupidation
1 year ago

403 error on the image. Oops.

Michael Suttkus, II
Michael Suttkus, II
1 year ago

I never watched Mr. Rogers growing up. Dad, hyperconservative that he was, never liked Fred Rogers and his peace-nik ways, so that was that.

Dad was a big fan of cowboy movies, though. And yet he didn’t like John Wayne either. I never thought to ask why. Too late now.

But any mention of John Wayne needs this quote from an interview with Playboy in 1971:

PLAYBOY: For years American Indians have played an important — if subordinate — role in your Westerns. Do you feel any empathy with them?

WAYNE: I don’t feel we did wrong in taking this great country away from them, if that’s what you’re asking. Our so-called stealing of this country from them was just a matter of survival. There were great numbers of people who needed new land, and the Indians were selfishly trying to keep it for themselves.

There’s more of that interview quoted at Snopes. It’s worth reading, if you need an example of White Privilege in full bloom.

https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/john-wayne-native-americans/

Naglfar
Naglfar
1 year ago

@Michael Suttkus, II
In that same interview, he stated some opinions on African-Americans as well.
I quote (TW racism):

With a lot of blacks, there’s quite a bit of resentment along with their dissent, and possibly rightfully so. But we can’t all of a sudden get down on our knees and turn everything over to the leadership of the blacks. I believe in white supremacy until the blacks are educated to a point of responsibility. I don’t believe in giving authority and positions of leadership and judgment to irresponsible people.

weirwoodtreehugger: chief manatee

Raffi is definitely still going!

tim gueguen
1 year ago

Fred Penner actually did a club tour a few years back, playing for college aged kids who grew up with his music.

The Conqueror is not only notorious for Wayne and other actors in yellowface, it is also notorious for how many of the cast and crew died of cancer. Outdoor scenes were filmed in St George, Utah, which is downwind of the Nevada National Security Site. Multiple above ground nuclear tests were conducted there, and the fallout tended to pass over St. George. There is debate if this actually contributed to the cancers that afflicted the crew, but many believe it did.

AsAboveSoBelow
AsAboveSoBelow
1 year ago

I love Fred Rogers. I was broken-hearted when he died. It seems like appreciation for him has only grown since his death. I wish he could see and know how widely and well loved he is. His 1984 interview with Terry Gross is a treasure.
https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=1178498

Growing up near Detroit, we got CBC, so we watched Mr. Dressup and The Friendly Giant. “Now look up. Wayyyyyy up.” We also got Sesame Street with French segments in it. Really great.

TB Tabby
TB Tabby
1 year ago

I’m always amused by people trying to bad-mouth Mr. Rogers. They’re only going to end up bringing a shitstorm down on themselves. Fred Rogers is the one person in the world who has absolute, universal respect from everyone.

Jenora Feuer
Jenora Feuer
1 year ago

You know, I’m actually a little surprised that we’re nearly done the first page on an article about Mr. Rogers winning against uber-macho types and nobody else has mentioned Ultimate Showdown of Ultimate Destiny yet. Then again, it was rather a niche thing of its time.

@AsAboveSoBelow:
I have a friend from Ottawa who is apparently a minor hero in parts of Detroit for providing some folks down there with copies of obscure Canadian children’s shows that some of them had seen on cheap antennas twenty or thirty years ago but had never been able to find again since.

Shadowplay
1 year ago

Ultimate Showdown of Ultimate Destiny matchup:

Mister Rogers vs. Bob Ross.

I’d watch it.

1 2 3