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men who should not ever be with women ever MGTOW misogyny reddit

MGTOWs have curiously strong feelings about Jim and Pam from The Office

By David Futrelle

So-called Men Going Their Own Way are having trouble getting over the long-running soap opera of Jim and Pam from The Office, a show that ceased production more than six years ago.

Not that they’re fans of either character. In the last few months, MGTOW Redditors have twice posted the same screencap from 4chan calling Pam a bitch; last year one MGTOW typed out a ten-point statement that he thought proved Jim was “the biggest Simp in Fiction.”

Their feelings about these two fictional characters and their imaginary sex lives seem, well, curiously strong. Take this exchange, found in yet another Jim/Pam thread in the MGTOW subreddit.

AhIndeed 10 points 1 month ago 
Jim is a huge beta male that played friend while she got railed by the more dominant Roy. Pam is a typical broad that got the best of both worlds-her abusive ex she gets to leave and look all heroic even though she prob loved the sex and then she gets her knight in shining armour.

permalinkembedunsavereportgive awardreply

[–]Mylesfakeaccount[S] 4 points 1 month ago 
Yes so she will probably find another alpha type

permalinkembedsaveparentreportgive awardreply

[–]AhIndeed 7 points 1 month ago 
She might cheat on Jim with another roy type down the line, but she secured her beta male provider

These guys seem to have spent quite a lot of time thinking about “roy types” having sex with — sorry, “railing” — Pam. I’m not quite sure which character they’re even jealous of in this scenario.

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Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
10 months ago

@ jenora

There’s 13 days difference due to the removed leap days

When the calendar was changed here there were protests with the slogan “Give us back our 13 days!“.

It’s common to put that forward as evidence for the ignorance of the common folk; that they could not understand it was just an abstract concept, they hadn’t really lost 13 days.

The peasantry of course understood that perfectly well. The protests were because rents were typically collected on ‘quarter days’; and landlords took advantage of the change to screw their tenants by not rebating the rent accordingly.

Jenora Feuer
Jenora Feuer
10 months ago

@Alan:
It was only 11 when the England and its colonies (including what would later become the U.S.) switched over in 1752. It was 13 by the time Russia switched over, because that wasn’t until after the Revolution in 1918, thanks to Russia being very heavily Orthodox at the time.

The Unix ‘ncal’ program actually has a database of stuff like that, and if you request a calendar for Great Britain for 1752 it skips directly from September 2nd to September 14th. There’s an option to that program which lists the dates by country code, and it’s interesting to watch the clusters as most of Europe switched in 1582 with a few stragglers afterward, Britain and its colonies in 1752 with most of Scandinavia the year after, and then several in the early 1900s including all of what became the USSR.

But yes, the fact that any sort of monthly bill was charging a month’s worth for only 19 days that year would understandably stick in people’s craws.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
10 months ago

@ jenora

I should have remembered that from the Faction Paradox stories (which I’ve never read). I knew it was a prime number anyway 🙂

Must have been annoying for people with birthdays then too.

Naglfar
Naglfar
10 months ago

@Alan Robertshaw

Must have been annoying for people with birthdays then too.

Here in America, we switched in 1752 along with the U.K. George Washington’s birth was originally recorded as February 11, 1731, but because after the calendar switch the new year was made to start January 1, his birth date is now usually listed as February 22, 1732.

Lumipuna (nee Arctic Ape)
Lumipuna (nee Arctic Ape)
10 months ago

Jenora Feuer wrote:

Essentially, yes, first Sunday after the first full moon after the vernal equinox, though the actual calculation is a bit more esoteric, based on the Metonic Cycle of 19 years == 235 months, and doesn’t rely on observations.

I don’t know the details on all this, but whether ancient civilizations used a solar or lunar calendar, they generally struggled with having to calculate, “how many days from now is the vernal equinox in year x from now?” They developed calculation models that were accurate on average, but not necessarily fully accurate for individual years.

It’s that way because the original Easter was tied to the Jewish Passover events (the ‘Last Supper’ was generally considered to be a Passover feast) and

Interesting. I understand that Passover is an 8-day celebration beginning approximately at full moon, whereas early Christians focused on celebrating their own Passover on a Sunday, because that was the day of resurrection. It was called by the same name as Passover, and still is in many European languages. “Easter” was the name of a pagan Anglo-Saxon holiday.

Passover is based on the Jewish lunar calendar. But when Christianity became tied to the Roman Empire after the First Council of Nicaea, a way to calculate it within the Julian solar calendar was needed.

I figure they initially used the Jewish calendar for that, but there was practical demand for a more simple system, which took many centuries to develop.

Lumipuna (nee Arctic Ape)
Lumipuna (nee Arctic Ape)
10 months ago

most of Europe switched in 1582 with a few stragglers afterward, Britain and its colonies in 1752 with most of Scandinavia the year after, and then several in the early 1900s including all of what became the USSR.

Sweden initially adopted a modified version of Gregorian calendar, with a different name, because of Lutheran “fuck the pope” sentiment. Gregorian calendar was adopted during 19th century, first in Sweden and then in Finland, which had been separated from Sweden in 1809. At least on one year, Finland’s Lutheran Easter (a state sanctioned holiday) was out of sync with all other countries.

Lumipuna (nee Arctic Ape)
Lumipuna (nee Arctic Ape)
10 months ago

But yes, the fact that any sort of monthly bill was charging a month’s worth for only 19 days that year would understandably stick in people’s craws.

I suspect that, since this whole thing was imposed on them from above by some faceless elites, and it clearly set an unusual precedent, they perhaps feared that “calendar corrections” might become a recurring thing.

Moon Custafer
Moon Custafer
10 months ago

There’s an interesting, and really complicated, historical mystery around the disappearance of one Elizabeth Canning, a maidservant, in early 1753. One of the difficulties is that the calendar had switched over a few months earlier, and witnesses testifying as to the locations of Canning and/or the people she’d accused of holding her prisoner, consequently had trouble recalling the dates on which they’d seen anybody, so basically everyone’s alibi in the case is a bit dodgy.

Edith Prickly
Edith Prickly
10 months ago

My crush on John Krasinski started with The Office and has not abated. Sigh. Sucks to be you, MGTOWs.