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Female authors stunned by revelation that some Reddit douchebag doesn’t read books by women

Soyboy mangina cuck reading a book written by a woman

By David Futrelle

The lady literary world is reeling from the revelation that some doofus on Reddit will no longer read books written by women.

The official announcement of this new no-lady-book policy was posted earlier today on the Men Going Their Own Way subreddit.

 Since going MGTOW I can't read books written by women anymore (self.MGTOW) submitted 10 hours ago by EMIYA18 I read a lot of self help literature, usually from the 80s-90s written by American or Japanese authors. Ever since learning MGTOW I started getting rid of books written by females. They seem so "fake".

Adding to the horror: it turns out that many of EMIYA18’s colleagues on the MGTOW subreddit also have “no books by lady authors” policies. (Except maybe that “Wrinkle in Time” book, that was cool.)

“I was like that even before MGTOW,” admitted TheDevilsAdvokaat.

A lot of women’s literature just seemed revolting. The attitudes, the ideas were nonsense and shitty.

There are very few women authors I have actually enjoyed; (So few I cannot even remember their names – I think there was one by a woman who wrote “detective” stories about a roman named Flavius set thousands of years ago). Most of them have weird notions of how the world works and males and females.

Obviously the good gentlemen of the MGTOW subreddit have much-less-weird notions about men and women and pretty much everything else.

Their “men” in particular seem two dimensional and seem to have no life or desire other than trying to please the woman in their life. Also, the most important thing in the book is a relationship between two people. It doesn’t matter if the entire universe is finally collapsing into a central black hole; the most important part of the book (And the most words) will be about some stupid relationship between the female protagonist and one or several men.

Yeah, I really hate that part in the Jane Austen book when the giant alien spiders are covering the earth in their radioactive webs and Emma is like, “Heathcliff, forget the spiders, I want to talk about us and that time you mansplained intergalactic time travel to me because tee hee I’m a girl and I don’t care, wait why am I talking to you, Mr. Darcy is much richer, bye boy, GIRL POWER!”

Ok to be honest I haven’t read any Jane Austen books.

Others agreed: Lady books are all about dumb lady things. “[M]ost of the time, feminine litterature is always about ma rights and ma vagina,” Maxentirunos sniffed. And he’s right: 60% of the time, feminine litterature is about vaginas every time.

And forget about getting any advice from a lady book unless it’s about tampons or something. “I can’t read anything written by a woman anymore about general life advice,” noted TopherOHoolihan.

Maybe if they are covering a specific topic okay, but if its supposed to be a book of wisdom- only men are wise

But it was a MGTOW Redditor called laptopdragon who took it to the next level, noting that he doesn’t even like hearing women talk.

I detest many womens voices on the radio.

especially the raspy, scratchy or whiny voices, and when they they say things:

like

you know

uhm

etc.

actually, it’s anyone with those shitty untrained lack of quality speakers that are on a speaking platform. fuck them and their agenda.

Damn those bitches and manginas pushing their insidious “like” and “you know” agenda!

In conclusion, all attempts by human females to communicate are bad. Happy Sunday!

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Nothing is Permanent But Woe
Nothing is Permanent But Woe
2 years ago

@Bina

Nice one! Sorry for the slow response, busy day.

Moon_custafer
Moon_custafer
2 years ago

While we’re recommending authors, Gemma Files (full disclosure – we know each other socially) writes entertaining, bloody, inventive fantasy and horror.

The Hexslinger books are about relationships AND about cutting a magically gruesome swathe across the Old West; several characters literally go to Hell and back for the people they love. There are also Aztec gods, tons of sex in variously-gendered pairings, and at one point, zombie dinosaurs.

Experimental Film: A Novel is about family, non-neurotypicality, ghosts, Canadian film history, things exploding, and lesser-known but incredibly ominous European fairy tales.

weirwoodtreehugger: chief manatee

apparently we’re douchbags for pointing out the fact that most if not all female authors are vastly inferior to male authors

Yeah, David. Why wouldn’t you want to join a group that thinks Tom Clancy’s writing is superior to Flannery O’Connor’s? Geez.

Also, given that the objectively worst writer on the planet is Vox Day, you really can’t claim that male authors are automatically superior. You just can’t.

Gaebolga
Gaebolga
2 years ago

weirwoodtreehugger wrote:

Also, given that the objectively worst writer on the planet is Vox Day, you really can’t claim that male authors are automatically superior. You just can’t.

Well, not if you want to be taken seriously. That’s never stopped these chucklefucks before, though.

Those Whose Toes Are Miggy always claim to be going their own way, so…yeah.

Tsots, the lot (just for you, Bina).

Carl Gordon Jenkins Gordon Jenkins
Carl Gordon Jenkins Gordon Jenkins
2 years ago

I’m fairly certain their ideal work of fiction would just be a series of bullet points describing the plot without having to deal with all that silly emotion.

They are the manliest type of point after all.

Who?
Who?
2 years ago

weirwoodtreehugger: chief manatee wrote:

Yeah, David. Why wouldn’t you want to join a group that thinks Tom Clancy’s writing is superior to Flannery O’Connor’s? Geez.

Also, given that the objectively worst writer on the planet is Vox Day, you really can’t claim that male authors are automatically superior. You just can’t.

Tom Clancy is a writer I have read one book of, and the reaction was never again. (His pro-republicanstance was looking way worse after Trump)

I am thinking bringing Voxy in it is kind of a cheat, because having him on any site of an argument makes that side look bad by default. (No argument that he is probably at last the worst writer, who is famous, what is worse his fiction or his non-fiction?)
It is funny that it will probably easier to define worst writer than best. (I would bet that if we ask here there would be a lot of names mentioned, and male or female will be completly irrelevant for many posters)

From your earlier post: I was not thinking about medicore plot with cardboard characters but of the few writers who really have interestings ideas but characters aren’t there strong suite.
And I would vote against watching bad movies a good one should be more fun.

MrsObedMarsh
MrsObedMarsh
2 years ago

Has anybody mentioned Angela Carter yet? I love her anthology The Bloody Chamber. All the stories are feminist takes on fairy tales or folktales – the title story is based on “Bluebeard,” which is generally read as a cautionary tale to inquisitive women.

Katamount
Katamount
2 years ago

Damn, I see the Blackadder quotes and Kate Beaton cartoons have already made their appearance, so I’ll add a couple things to the convo.

1) Where I think a lot of writers (of all genders) go wrong is seeing the relationship stuff as separate from the main driver of the story when it has to be intertwined. If you’ve seen

Enemy At The Gates

, it’s a solid war story right up until the love triangle brings the plot train to a screeching halt. Same could be said for the Star Wars prequels (although the main plot was dumb too).

Contrast that with

Casablanca

, where the love triangle was critical to the choices Rick and Ilsa made in the face of grave danger. There were high stakes involved in their reunion and when Rick has to make the decision to put Ilsa on the plane with Laszlo, he says rather poignantly:

Ilsa, I’m no good at being noble, but it doesn’t take much to see that the problems of three little people don’t amount to a hill of beans in this crazy world.

One of the MGTOWs in the OP alluded to this and there’s a kernel of truth there. I’m not sure I entirely agree with that sentiment, as the character elements that relationships bring were clearly important in that film, but I think it captures the perspective issues when it comes to a lot of fiction: if your story is about a larger threat, there’s an urgency that forces plot-derailing relationship stuff to take a back seat.

Unfortunately, I think the popularity of the Twilight (and consequently the 50 Shades) franchise only solidified this misconception that this is a “thing” in women’s or YA fiction. While the issues with Twilight are legion, Lindsay Ellis, in her apology to Stephanie Meyer video is entirely right when she says that the backlash was entirely disproportionate and the problematic relationship dynamics were more of a post-hoc rationalization than the core of what the backlash was. The backlash was the same thing we saw Justin Bieber: that’s girly stuff and girly stuff is stupid. The fact that the characters are flat, the plot only shows up in the last quarter of the first book, the pisspoor writing and plot holes… all post-hoc rationalizations by and large. Me, I just wanted to know what it was this particular teen girl/vampire story that made it big. I’ve actually read my fair share of the paranormal erotic fiction genre (which isn’t that much of a stretch when you’re a furry like me) and there’s wayyyyy more engaging stuff out there. But I’m not going to put blame on the fans of Twilight or Stephanie Meyer for her work getting big. If there’s anybody to blame for cultural phenomena, it’s really the advertisers and marketers that throw things in your face every waking hour.

2) The idea that this is some kind of “women-only” thing is absolutely absurd. Plenty of men have written crap stories with shoehorned wish-fulfillment relationships that serve no character function and just derail the plot. They also have a nasty habit of substituting dire grimdark circumstance for character, as if the fact that Steve Scowlington, with his emotional distance and chiseled jaw, is able to rise to the occasion and shoot the threat in the face is all the character development you really need.

Steve Scowlington: He Shoot Things. While white.

Plenty of examples have been cited of women writing great works in genres that society has coded as “male” (particularly want to shout out the late great Ursula K. LeGuin and Octavia Butler in the sci-fi/fantasy genres). There’s also plenty of fluff written by men (looking your way RPO). Notice the disproportionate responses and analyze accordingly.

MrsObedMarsh
MrsObedMarsh
2 years ago

What sucks is that the romance genre is looked down upon by a lot of male and female readers, even by readers of other marginalized genres like SF/F, pretty much because it’s the only genre primarily written by and for women. The “female” fantasy of romance – getting a sexy, supportive lover while assuming a fulfilling role in one’s community – is dismissed as silly, even cringe-worthy; the “male” fantasy of action/thrillers – killing bad guys and screwing beautiful women in exciting locales – is held in much more esteem, if not actively celebrated by our culture.

j
j
2 years ago

In the virtue of pure honesty, I’m just going to say that I feel like there’s a big untapped market of horny teenage girls. Twilight hit that market pretty well and was accessible to the main stream. Along with the correct marketing it’s no wonder it was a success.

And I used to read these books as a teen myself, the typical misunderstood girl out of her element meets Gary Stu Mysterious Man who has an interest in girl for reasons. The closer she gets to Gary Stu, the closer she gets to a hidden world rife with danger and suspense. Oh, and she doesn’t know it yet but she’s different. She’s ‘chosen’ to have some unique power that makes her important.

But hey, not every piece of media has to be some deep introspection on the human condition. They’re fun to read and I don’t regret a single minute of it.

Jo
Jo
2 years ago

There’s also the Dragonriders of Pern series by Anne McCaffrey and the novels of Ursula LeGuin, Mercedes Lackey, and Dianna Wynne Jones.

Patricia Highsmith’s stories include Strangers on a Train and the Talented Mr. Ripley.

Another interesting example is Julian Clare May, a female writer who was involved with comic cons for decades (she first chaired a con in 1952).

Other women were involved with sci-fi fan zines, newsletters, etc. long before the internet. They basically disprove the notion that fake geek girls are destroying nerd culture and comic cons.

Victorious Parasol
Victorious Parasol
2 years ago

Uh, j? Which books are you talking about? I haven’t seen any book recommendations on this thread that fit your description “the typical misunderstood girl out of her element meets Gary Stu Mysterious Man who has an interest in girl for reasons.”

Nanny Oggs Busom
Nanny Oggs Busom
2 years ago

While I don’t give a fig if MIGTOWs read my books, the fairly well-known bias against women writers who write in supposedly masculine genres is why my crime series will be published under my initials, like jk Rowling did.

j
j
2 years ago

I was talking about Twilight and other stories like them. Girl x Monster romance type novels. I wasn’t referring to any of the recommendations listed here at all!

I haven’t had the chance to sit with a good book in a while though.

Katamount
Katamount
2 years ago

the “male” fantasy of action/thrillers – killing bad guys and screwing beautiful women in exciting locales – is held in much more esteem, if not actively celebrated by our culture.

Look no further than James Bond. Of course, Ian Fleming’s original character had vulnerabilities that were explored on occasion and there was a colonial sense of the “exotic” in a post-war Great Britain that was divesting its colonial assets, but Hollywood has kept it going for more than half a century now.

What sucks is that the romance genre is looked down upon by a lot of male and female readers, even by readers of other marginalized genres like SF/F, pretty much because it’s the only genre primarily written by and for women. The “female” fantasy of romance – getting a sexy, supportive lover while assuming a fulfilling role in one’s community – is dismissed as silly, even cringe-worthy

Yeah, it’s incredibly lame that more SF/F fans don’t make that connection. SF/F was (and arguably still is) considered pulp right alongside the Fabio-covered Harlequin bodice-rippers. The issue Harlequin had was the same issue I had with them: they were too chaste! I mean, c’mon, romance is the time to get explicit! Don’t skimp on the details of the climax, if’n ya know what I mean.

It’s easy for me to say that now, but I think that brings to mind a deeper problem: women’s sexuality is still heavily policed if not outright demonized. Sometimes literally. I play Diablo III a lot and the “Maiden of Lust” mini-boss is a demonic half-woman half-spider. And that game came out in 2010. So perhaps having a proactive sexual female protagonist wasn’t considered “marketable” in the 80s and 90s. It’s actually one of the things I appreciate about the paranormal romance genre: the subject matter offers women a parity often denied them in other genres, be it physical parity with enhanced strength or social parity with covens or werewolf packs.

Moon_custafer
Moon_custafer
2 years ago

I used to think I wasn’t into the romance (in the modern sense) genre, but since I started reading fanfic I’ve decided that love scenes are great fun when they take place between characters I like.

Victorious Parasol
Victorious Parasol
2 years ago

Thanks for the clarification, j. I hope you have a chance to check out some of the authors I recommended earlier – they write good stuff.

epitome of incomprehensibility

@Rabid Rabbit –

Probably unrelated, but your comment about Amber Tamblyn’s new book reminded me of two novels with evil female protagonists. Unfortunately for the MGTOWs, both were written by women…

The Hottest Dishes of the Tartar Cuisine by Alina Bronsky – about a woman and her family’s journey from Russia to Germany. She’s stupidly naive in a lot of ways but also incredibly scheming. It starts when her daughter (whom she scorns and dislikes) is pregnant; when her granddaughter leads to a lot of black humour, but the stresses of emigration are shown pretty realistically, so I ended up feeling sorry for her at times.

The Coldest Winter Ever by Sister Souljah – this is more of a blockbuster-type… less realism… you could say moralistic, but I think the author’s doing something more interesting here. It stars a spoiled teenage girl named Winter from a mob family – a family member dies violently – she has to fend for herself… but doesn’t do so in an honest , non-betraying-people, non-violent way.

In the middle of the book, Sister Souljah herself shows up as a do-gooder voice of reason. Winter (and probably the author herself) proceeds to make fun of the in-book Souljah and cast doubt on her statements. For instance, book-Souljah talks about AIDS conspiracy theories (unlikely to reflect her real beliefs, as the book was published in 1999) and muses aloud that popular (imaginary) rappers might be, horror of horrors, bisexual. I don’t think this is just Souljah mocking her earlier self, though; I mean, I’m a white person from Canada here, but I think she’s commenting on tensions within the black American communities as well as what white people think about black people. There’s certainly the theme of racial profiling by cops and the recognition that Winter’s former wealth-bubble shielded her from the worst kinds of racism.

Anyway, yes, I recommend these books. Also Jane Eyre Vs. the Zombie Space Dinosaurs, Jane Austen’s underrated classic. 😛

Fishy Goat
Fishy Goat
2 years ago

Don’t miss its sequel: Jane Eyre and the Megathanatonic Spaceship of Doom!

Who?
Who?
2 years ago

Another Genere that often gets bad reputiton is the urban fantasygenere, often called only Twilightclones (Js post let me think about it, together with MrsObedMarshs post about romance), what isn’t true.
Someone should pick up a book by Seanan McGuire, or one of the Rivers of Londonbooks (male writer) to see nope, there is more on it.

And Seanan was once asked when (not if when!!!) one of her maincharacters would be raped. The answer never was awasome, even if the works can get dark.

Another writer I want to mention (even if I know here more shorter works) is Ursula Vernon.

I have seen two much people (okay teachers here) fight wars against books that are trivial (not good enough), and I always thought for kids it is good when they read, what is secondary. Analysing the content is of course important, but I have seen to much crap posted that showed that the critic had no idea about the work he critizised. (My favorite was when a schoolbook meant the SFstory could have easily transported to a western, so trash, somethink that is true for nearly everything)

C.A.Collins
C.A.Collins
2 years ago

Honestly, I like almost any genre better than romance–because relationships are not what interests me. It doesn’t make romance less difficult to write well than mystery or science fiction; it’s my taste in the matter.
Has anyone recommended Leckie yet? Grand space-opera.

Moggie
Moggie
2 years ago

C.A.Collins:

Has anyone recommended Leckie yet? Grand space-opera.

Yep, I did. TBH, I thought that Provenance was a little weak, but the Imperial Radch trilogy was terrific. It’s possible I’m judging the former too harshly, because I read it interspersed with Jemisin’s Broken Earth series, against which pretty much anything would seem lacking.

Romance: very much not my thing, but seeing it mentioned reminds me that writers are starting to talk about problems with racism within that field:

https://twitter.com/courtneymilan/status/980872293256544256

Oh, and while I’m in a recommending mood: I’ve just watched Hbomb’s latest video, on Lovecraft, and I really like how his work is developing. This was a very strong and heartfelt piece.

MrsObedMarsh
MrsObedMarsh
2 years ago

If any of you are thinking of getting into romance, I recommend Smart Bitches, Trashy Books, a review and blogging site. The site-runners and the community are sassy and stridently feminist – much like Mammotheers – and love recommending books of all kinds. Some of the reviews are a lot of fun to read; probably my favorite one is for Shayla Black’s Decadent. You gotta see it to believe it.

Hippodameia
Hippodameia
2 years ago

Popping in to plug P.C. Hodgell.

Kat, ambassador of the feminist government in exile
Kat, ambassador of the feminist government in exile
2 years ago

@Alan

@ Kat

I read that book when I was fourteen

It’s funny you should say that…

But what the prosecution failed to comprehend was that the 1959 Act had wrought some important changes in the law. Although it retained a “tendency to deprave and corrupt” as the test of obscenity, books had now to be “taken as a whole” – that is, not judged solely on their purple passages – and only in respect of persons likely to read them; in other words, not 14-year-old schoolgirls, unless they were directed to that teenage market.

Oh. Em. Gee!

Such outrage over long, flowery descriptions.

Funnily enough in light of what MGTOW say about the work of female authors, Wikipedia says this about Lady Chatterley’s Lover:

Love and personal relationships are the threads that bind this novel together.

Redsilkphoenix: Jetpack Vixen, Intergalactic Meanie
Redsilkphoenix: Jetpack Vixen, Intergalactic Meanie
2 years ago

For those interested in reading it, here’s the original post by McGuire where she first discusses the ‘when not if’ of having her female characters raped:

https://seanan-mcguire.livejournal.com/470626.html

I can’t find the link for it, but she did do a follow-up post where she said under what circumstances she would write such a story involving her female characters. Short answer: not in a series meant to be fluff and entertainment, but in a story where the rape would be treated seriously like it needs to be.

Natasha Whilk
Natasha Whilk
2 years ago

Malitia: YES re: Harry Potter and class privilege. So glad not to be alone in feeling this way!

I don’t know whether anybody except Alan Robertshaw reads my very occasional comments. If anybody who does is a Jane Austen fan, I’d like to recommend the recent book “Jane on the Brain,” which explores attachment theory and social neuroscience and illustrates the concepts by showing how they are demonstrated in Austen’s novels. Enormous fun with a bonus of serious education.

Natasha Whilk
Natasha Whilk
2 years ago

Having read the rest…oh, my, lots of great recommendations. (I was going to recommend Tanya Huff, but I see I’m not the first. Her “Blood” series is perhaps the only vampire stuff I’ve loved, and “Summon the Keeper” with wizarding cats…. oh, and the far-too-obscure “Gate of Darkness, Circle of Light.”)

FWIW, I love Bujold (Vorkosigan, not the fantasy), Hambly, and so many of the authors mentioned. And one of my proudest accomplishments is reading a Tiptree story at age 14 and saying, “hmm, that’s obviously a female author writing under a male pseudonym,” Amusingly–NOT ironically–the story was “The Women Men Don’t See.”

Violet, I will write to David for info; seeing your comments, I would like to read your novel. (You can also drop me an email, though this is not my real name and I rarely check this email account.)

Siri Hustvedt can be great fun, but I am ambivalent about some of her ideas on gender.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
2 years ago

@ Natasha

Hey, nice to see you back. Yeah, I really enjoy your posts; I’m sure lots of other people do too though. But I always learn something from you.

I’ve just been reading the reviews of Jane on the Brain. It’s a great idea, and very pertinent to both the current subject matter of the thread, and I think generally for analysing that ‘reelz not feelz’ thing that crops up a lot. It seems it’ll be a good primer for responding to those “We’re logical; you’re just emotional” arguments that are a big thing amongst certain people and groups.

Cheers for the heads up.

Mish of the Catlady Ascendancy
Mish of the Catlady Ascendancy
2 years ago

@Natasha Whilk

I’ve just checked out reviews of Jane on the Brain and am ordering it now. Thanks for mentioning it – it looks fab 🙂

@Mrs Obed Marsh

Seconding Angela Carter’s The Bloody Chamber (although all her fiction is brilliant). She was taken from us far too soon.

opposablethumbs
opposablethumbs
2 years ago

Just re-read The Women Men Don’t See thanks to your mention, @Natasha – thank you for that welcome reminder! It’s even better than I remembered. Her unreliable narrator is just so well, so meticulously written. Ugh. Brilliant.

AuntieMame Redux
AuntieMame Redux
2 years ago

@jo

Huge virtual squee to you. I love Julian May and think that her mind book cycle that includes The Pleistocene Exile quartet deserves to be a lot better remembered.

Adding recommendations for Kage Baker and her immortal art preserving cyborgs.

Thanks to everyone else for the recommendations. I’m on my way to amazon to browse them. The fatigue of chronic illness has me in its iron grip today, so that is a good activity for me.

Happy Fourth to American mammoths and a general shout out to all. I love reading all of you and for every post I wrote there are at least three other responses that only get composed in my head. Y’all make me want to have conversations.

Jo
Jo
2 years ago

@Auntie Mame

Thanks! You too.

I started reading May’s books after I learned about her place in comic con history.

They’re awesome! I will look into Kage Baker as well.

Hendrake
Hendrake
2 years ago

I’m a little late, but while we’re exchanging recommendation, I’ve just finished reading a short story collection by Yoon Ha Lee called conservation of shadows. It’s mostly weird space opera-ish and it’s very, very good.

Her Machineries of Empires trilogy is also very good, a weird universe in which people battle using maths, geometry and calendars.

And if these people think women authors are only able to write about feelings, they should check out Cassandra Khaw. Here is a free short story of hers that chills me to the bone (pun intended) :

https://www.tor.com/2017/07/26/these-deathless-bones/

Virgin Mary
Virgin Mary
2 years ago

The ending of the third episode of Seth McFarlain’s space comedy/ drama The Orville, ‘About a Girl’ is about this exactly!
Bortus and Klyden are both male from the all male species, the Mochlan. They have an egg hatch and are shocked that the child is a daughter, which according to Mochlan society is seen as a birth defect. Bortus arranges to take the child to his home planet to be surgically altered, after which his husband Klyden confides that he too was born a female. Captain Ed Mercer disagrees with their decision to have the child surgically altered without consent and a typical ‘Star Trek’ style trial ensues in which Mercer tries to prove to the Mochlan court that females are equal, if not better than male.
At the end, he tracks down the most popular Mochlan poet who turns out to be a female who lives as a hermit!!

Dalillama
Dalillama
2 years ago

I wish Seth McFarlane would stop.

Re: female authors, I’m quite liking the Murderbot Diaries by Martha Wells (Her Raksura series is fantasy but lessmy cup of tea; also she has other books I haven’t read). MGTOWs will be happy to know the protagonist isn’t a woman and is deeply uninterested in having romantic or sexual relationships (or any sort, really) with men.

Surplus to Requirements, Observer of the Vast Blight-Wing Enstupidation
Surplus to Requirements, Observer of the Vast Blight-Wing Enstupidation
2 years ago

Stop what?

Moon_custafer
Moon_custafer
2 years ago

@ Hendrake –

I believe Yoon Ha Lee is a transman though.

Jenora Feuer
Jenora Feuer
2 years ago

With regards to romance, I long considered Anne McCaffrey to be in many ways a romance writer who just liked using fantastic or SF settings. Including pushing the edges into softcore porn a couple of times. That said, I’ve read some of her straight romance as well, like Year of the Lucy. Granted, McCaffrey has some of her own issues with portrayal of women.

Ursula Vernon’s stuff is also great. You can tell that this is someone who thinks through all of the weird little implications of how the fantasy world works. And then will include things like oracular slugs. It’s difficult to have entirely self-consistent absurdity, but she manages.

@Natasha Whilk:
I loved Gate of Darkness, Circle of Light. Then again, I first met Tanya Huff back when she was still writing short stories as ‘T.S. Huff’ due to the previously-mentioned issues with women writers getting overlooked. I was actively picking up her stuff from the first novel.

(Gate of Darkness, Circle of Light also has one of the best ‘artist complaining about the cover’ stories I ever heard. The original cover was supposed to be of a scene from the story that involved a police car running into a unicorn. Since the artist wasn’t local to Toronto, where the story was set, Tanya Huff took a lot of pictures of the standard Metro Toronto Police car design at the time to send to the artist. When she saw the final cover, the police car was perfect… but the unicorn was wrong. The unicorn in the story was small and somewhat goat-like with heavy fetlocks that could be actually run over by a big car; the unicorn on the cover was this giant rearing Arabian stallion that would probably have left even a police car undrivable after impact.)

@Katamount:
I’ve read most of the original Fleming. (My grandfather had a complete collection of everything Fleming wrote. Yes, including Chitty Chitty Bang Bang.) And yeah, Bond was pretty much an alcoholic womanizing sociopath kept on a short leash. One of the reasons why some people like Daniel Craig as Bond is that he’s a lot closer to the books than Roger Moore ever was. (Moore was largely still playing The Saint and calling him Bond.)

Victorious Parasol
Victorious Parasol
2 years ago

Note: I’ve known Kelly and her wife for years and I think they’re awesome people. Proof of their awesome: when marriage equality came to Canada, they had Storm and Rogue of the X-men as wedding toppers on their cake.

If you’re interested in a different sort of horror, may I recommend Kelly Robson? Link to one of her latest short stories is below. I’m not a horror fan, but Kelly’s a great writer – just won her first Nebula.

https://uncannymagazine.com/article/what-gentle-women-dare/

Hendrake
Hendrake
2 years ago

@Moon_custafer

You are right. I did a swift search about him and the site I found misgendered him.

I am so very sorry. I should have double checked.

Dalillama
Dalillama
2 years ago

@Surplus

Stop what?

Making tv shows, thinking he’s competent to address queer issues, thinking he’s competent to address any social issues whatsoever, trying to be funny, talking…

AuntieMame Redux
AuntieMame Redux
2 years ago

Thanks @jo. Kage Baker is a lot of fun.

Thanks @handbrake and Victorious Parasol for links to stories. Just as an aside the Tor site is amazing. Lots of free stories and rereads of classic series. Always a fun place to visit.

Surplus to Requirements, Observer of the Vast Blight-Wing Enstupidation
Surplus to Requirements, Observer of the Vast Blight-Wing Enstupidation
2 years ago

@Dalillama: So, I take it you didn’t like The Orville?

Natasha Whilk
Natasha Whilk
2 years ago

Thanks for the replies, guys. (I am a New Yorker, albeit expatriated to Boston, and “guys” is a gender-neutral form of address n my idiolect. If it offends anybody, please let me know, and I’ll do my best to use ither language.)

@Alan: always good to see you.

@opposablethumbs: You’re very welcome. And now I want to go re-read all of Tiptree.

@Mish: Excellent! If you feel like writing anything about your reaction to “Jane on the Brain,” I’d be interested in hearing it.

@Jenora: Thanks for reminding me of Ursula Vernon’s name. I’ve been meaning to read since hearing her speak at a con, but had forgotten. And hurrah for another Tanya Huff fan! I hadn’t heard that cover story before.

Natasha Whilk
Natasha Whilk
2 years ago

Oops, tried to edit and posted twice. David, could you kindly remove the first one? Thanks.

Moon_custafer
Moon_custafer
2 years ago

@Hendrake:

No problem – I’ve just been reading his blog lately, so I thought I should say something.

Dalillama
Dalillama
2 years ago

@Surplus
The premise, as described previously by commenters here, fills me with red rage. My reaction to the episode synopsis above cannot be described on this blog. Regardless, I’m not going to waste any more of my life actually watching McFarlane’s latest screen excretion.

AuntieMameRedux
AuntieMameRedux
2 years ago

@Natasha Whilk – We must both be East Coasters, though I alas am really exiled to the semi-rural high desert of the intermountain west, because I too use guys as a gender neutral term.

For others, I ordered the Coldest Winter Ever and am looking forward to it and am going to look up the Orville. I also found a free read of Tiptree’s The Men Women Don’t See and Tiptree is just as amazing as I remember her.

I once had a boss who yelled at me for not reading enough male authors. It was weird because as a reader I am utterly unbiased. I will read anyone who tells a good story or presents interesting facts in an elegant way, but that is when I learned that not reading women – or I imagine anyone not correctly raced or gendered – is still a thing. More for us I guess.

Surplus to Requirements, Observer of the Vast Blight-Wing Enstupidation
Surplus to Requirements, Observer of the Vast Blight-Wing Enstupidation
2 years ago

@Dalillama: My recollection is the premise was “diverse bunch of progressive-ish people flying around in space”; in fact, pretty much “Star Trek: The Next Generation with the serial numbers filed off and somewhat more humor”; but perhaps my recollection fails me. It has, after all, been the better part of a year since any of it aired.