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Female authors stunned by revelation that some Reddit douchebag doesn’t read books by women

Soyboy mangina cuck reading a book written by a woman

By David Futrelle

The lady literary world is reeling from the revelation that some doofus on Reddit will no longer read books written by women.

The official announcement of this new no-lady-book policy was posted earlier today on the Men Going Their Own Way subreddit.

 Since going MGTOW I can't read books written by women anymore (self.MGTOW) submitted 10 hours ago by EMIYA18 I read a lot of self help literature, usually from the 80s-90s written by American or Japanese authors. Ever since learning MGTOW I started getting rid of books written by females. They seem so "fake".

Adding to the horror: it turns out that many of EMIYA18’s colleagues on the MGTOW subreddit also have “no books by lady authors” policies. (Except maybe that “Wrinkle in Time” book, that was cool.)

“I was like that even before MGTOW,” admitted TheDevilsAdvokaat.

A lot of women’s literature just seemed revolting. The attitudes, the ideas were nonsense and shitty.

There are very few women authors I have actually enjoyed; (So few I cannot even remember their names – I think there was one by a woman who wrote “detective” stories about a roman named Flavius set thousands of years ago). Most of them have weird notions of how the world works and males and females.

Obviously the good gentlemen of the MGTOW subreddit have much-less-weird notions about men and women and pretty much everything else.

Their “men” in particular seem two dimensional and seem to have no life or desire other than trying to please the woman in their life. Also, the most important thing in the book is a relationship between two people. It doesn’t matter if the entire universe is finally collapsing into a central black hole; the most important part of the book (And the most words) will be about some stupid relationship between the female protagonist and one or several men.

Yeah, I really hate that part in the Jane Austen book when the giant alien spiders are covering the earth in their radioactive webs and Emma is like, “Heathcliff, forget the spiders, I want to talk about us and that time you mansplained intergalactic time travel to me because tee hee I’m a girl and I don’t care, wait why am I talking to you, Mr. Darcy is much richer, bye boy, GIRL POWER!”

Ok to be honest I haven’t read any Jane Austen books.

Others agreed: Lady books are all about dumb lady things. “[M]ost of the time, feminine litterature is always about ma rights and ma vagina,” Maxentirunos sniffed. And he’s right: 60% of the time, feminine litterature is about vaginas every time.

And forget about getting any advice from a lady book unless it’s about tampons or something. “I can’t read anything written by a woman anymore about general life advice,” noted TopherOHoolihan.

Maybe if they are covering a specific topic okay, but if its supposed to be a book of wisdom- only men are wise

But it was a MGTOW Redditor called laptopdragon who took it to the next level, noting that he doesn’t even like hearing women talk.

I detest many womens voices on the radio.

especially the raspy, scratchy or whiny voices, and when they they say things:

like

you know

uhm

etc.

actually, it’s anyone with those shitty untrained lack of quality speakers that are on a speaking platform. fuck them and their agenda.

Damn those bitches and manginas pushing their insidious “like” and “you know” agenda!

In conclusion, all attempts by human females to communicate are bad. Happy Sunday!

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Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
2 years ago

and when they they say things:

I’ve done a bit of radio and it turns out saying things is a big part of it. Which is a pity really cause I thought getting Marcel Marceu on the show was a bit of a coup.

tim gueguen
2 years ago

I wonder what their attitude towards books co-written by men and women are. The last piece of commercial fiction I read was Green Hair Don’t Care, the compilation of the first five issues of Snotgirl. It’s a collaboration between Bryan Lee O’Malley and Leslie Hung. Perhaps that’s a bad example, because the lead character is a woman.

Bonelady
Bonelady
2 years ago

Well, there have always been men like that, who won’t read books by women. That’s why J. K. Rowling goes by J. K. rather than Jo. Because boys won’t read books by women. Same with Alice Mary Norton (Andre) and C. L. Moore. But romance is a big seller, so at least some women don’t miss the boy buyers. It’s dumb to not read books based on the sex of the author, but stupid is as stupid does, I guess.

Mea
Mea
2 years ago

Who could forget the sweet, overflowing-with feels, romance of Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein”?

Thinwhiteduchess1
Thinwhiteduchess1
2 years ago

Yes what a bunch of fluff Shirley Jackson and Flannery O’Connor wrote.

Buttercup Q. Skullpants
Buttercup Q. Skullpants
2 years ago

Also, the most important thing in the book is a relationship between two people.

Characters who do and say things are the worst. The best plots are when the protagonists are rocks.

weirwoodtreehugger: chief manatee

Their “men” in particular seem two dimensional and seem to have no life or desire other than trying to please the woman in their life.

I have read a few “chick lit” books where this is the case. The Stephanie Plum series comes to mind. However, are they really going to pretend like male authors always write three dimensional female characters who serve a purpose other than romance or sex object? Because no. It’s not just in literature that this is the issue. It’s all media After all, gamergate happened in part because icky feeemales had the gall to suggest that it might be nice to have video games that had female playable characters with traits other wears bikini armor and has physics defying boob jiggle.

Ben
Ben
2 years ago

I’ve seen threads like this one before, and I think it’s funny how women supposedly aren’t the serious thinkers and yet every single male poster struggles to gesture towards any “good” literature that’s not a bunch of stereotypes from the canon.

Z&T
Z&T
2 years ago

Self and pals here actually do spend time discussing business, investment, and economic ideas. And we do read non fiction related books.

Such as this:
https://www.amazon.com/Smartest-Guys-Room-Amazing-Scandalous/dp/1591840538

And not only did this woman write this book, she was the first to pick up on Enron’s cooked books.

Iseult The Idle
Iseult The Idle
2 years ago

I’m guessing you haven’t read Wuthering Heights, either, if you think Austen came up with Heathcliff.

Anyway, big surprise here. Men who hate women don’t want to read books by women. Why do they think women used to use male pseudonyms to get their work published for centuries?

Speaking of which, I wonder how many of these guys have read books by women without realizing it, because we’re sneaky and shit.

Valentin - Emigrantski Ragamuffin
Valentin - Emigrantski Ragamuffin
2 years ago

Who could forget the sweet, overflowing-with feels, romance of Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein”?

I will argue that Frankenstein is romance. Romance is not about just love story, it is about feelings and philosophy. I know it is science fiction but Frankenstein is also so much about what is human, what is love, what is family, what is acceptance – there is lots of evidence there to argue that it is “romantic”. especially since it is written in the time of romantics.

Luzbelitx
2 years ago

Ok to be honest I haven’t read any Jane Austen books.

You monster.

kupo
kupo
2 years ago

Who could forget the sweet, overflowing-with feels, romance of Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein”?

What caught my attention when reading it was how emotional the men were. They would be sick in bed for months over emotional upsets, while the women just dealt with it.

Lividity
Lividity
2 years ago

TBH I think David referenced Austen & Healthcliff together on purpose.

Full Metal Ox
2 years ago

So will this deter manosphereans from regurgitating that tenderly sentimental mushfest Atlas Shrugged at anyone within range?

iknklast
iknklast
2 years ago

This isn’t such an “outrageous” idea, nor unique to MGTOWs. Studies have shown that women who write plays are much less likely to get their plays read than men who write plays (who find it difficult enough to get their plays read, because theatres receive hundreds every year).

The story is that women write plays about women, and men write plays about ideas and action. People won’t go to see plays about women, or so the story goes. But…most theatre tickets are purchased by women. Plays by women sell more tickets and make more money than plays by men…but run for a much shorter time.

I wish the phenomenon of not reading things by “lady writers” was unique to MGTOWs, but as a “lady writer”, I have to deal with the problem all the time. I started sending my plays off under initials, even though my name is one of those that could be either. Initials scream out “male” to most people.

When the competition is blind, the odds are that “lady” plays will be selected approximately half the time.

weirwoodtreehugger: chief manatee

Frankenstein’s Monster gets a sad when he figures out that people are repulsed by his appearance. So vain! Only an emotional feeeeeemale would write that. Then again, the rejection does lead to him killing people. Maybe he’s an incel hero? Must’ve been secretly written by Percy.

Bina
2 years ago

Looks like migtoes are going their own way…from expanded literary horizons and cultural and mental enrichment.

BTW, this…

Their “men” in particular seem two dimensional and seem to have no life or desire other than trying to please the woman in their life.

…amused me no end, because all you have to do is switch out the genders of the authors and characters, and you get a common complaint by female readers about men writing women characters unconvincingly. Or something dwelling unduly on the lady’s boobage. Or both.

Catalpa
Catalpa
2 years ago

Who could forget the sweet, overflowing-with feels, romance of Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein”?

What caught my attention when reading it was how emotional the men were. They would be sick in bed for months over emotional upsets, while the women just dealt with it.

Mary Shelly hung out with Lord Byron quite a bit. I can’t help but think that her acquaintance with him might have leant some inspiration to that aspect of things.

Tabby Lavalamp
Tabby Lavalamp
2 years ago

Ok to be honest I haven’t read any Jane Austen books.

Not to worry! Men are making them better by adding zombies and action.

Also, adding zombies and action to a Jane Austen novel is enough to make a mediocre white man the first choice to direct a major superhero movie (The Flash). Even though he has since dropped out, directors who are not white men are still trying to pry apart their rage-clenched jaws.

Dvärghundspossen
Dvärghundspossen
2 years ago

@Catalpa:
It’s the same in Shelley’s “the last man”, the men are super emotional (although in that book, as far as I recall, so are a bunch of women), in this very self centered way where what really matters isn’t some tragedy but how they feel about the tragedy. I also thought that maybe she knew a bunch of people who were like that in real life.

Moggie
Moggie
2 years ago

I read a lot of self help literature

Oh good. When are you going to improve yourself?

Actually, reading a lot of self-help books sounds strange to me. It’s like saying “I mostly read Haynes car workshop manuals”. You’ve very soon read enough, and need to just get on and do the work.

Shadowplay
2 years ago

Dunnoa, Moggie. I read a lot of Haynes manuals.

The infinite number of ways manufacturers can make a single, vital screw inaccessable to all but a professional contortionist who does gyno on the side is fascinating.

occasional reader
occasional reader
2 years ago

Hello.

Are my comments working this week ?

Hmm, in term of heroic-fantasy (or is it dark-fantasy ?), there could be the novels from Robin Hobb ? The Farseer trilogy and the following ones seem to have a large public.

Have a nice day.

Weatherwax
Weatherwax
2 years ago

There are very few women authors I have actually enjoyed; (So few I cannot even remember their names – I think there was one by a woman who wrote “detective” stories about a roman named Flavius set thousands of years ago).

I love Lindsey Davis’ Falco novels too. I hope she isn’t tainted by this cockwomble’s regard.

Kat, ambassador of the feminist government in exile
Kat, ambassador of the feminist government in exile
2 years ago

Of course incels don’t enjoy books written by (at least most) women! They’re about relationships and connections and similar fake stuff.

Incels, avoid all books. You never know when a set of initials stands for the name of some female who decided to write about her “feelings” and “ideas.” Stick to your videos that explore nonconsensual sex.

The Real Cie
The Real Cie
2 years ago

I do especially like the part about Emma and Heathcliff battling the spiders from Mars. Something like that anyway.

Nothing is Permanent But Woe
Nothing is Permanent But Woe
2 years ago

There’s a quote from Siri Hustvedt’s ‘The Summer Without Men’ that seems apposite here:

“Women read fiction written by women and by men. Most men don’t. If a man opens a novel, he likes to have a masculine name on the cover; it’s reassuring somehow. You never know what might happen to that external genitalia if you immerse yourself in imaginary doings concocted by someone with the goods on the inside. “

Miss Cobalt
Miss Cobalt
2 years ago

Misogynists don’t like books written by feeeeeeeeeeeeemmaaaaaaaalllles

In other news, water is wet

happy cat
happy cat
2 years ago

I bet some of them read books by Robin Hobb and enjoy them because they think she’s a man.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
2 years ago

If we’re talking Wuthering Heights I’ll just post my favourite grumpy sign. I especially like the implied “So stop bloody asking”.

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Weasel-rah
Weasel-rah
2 years ago

YV
YV
2 years ago

Hmm, this is interesting. Lately, my reading habits have actually changed to the point that I now read mostly female authors. It wasn’t anything intentional, and one of my favorite authors is still Terry Pratchett, who is definitely male, but I just realized that I enjoyed those books more. Turns out I actually like reading authors who know how to write women as if they’re people, rather than plot devices, and that well-written relationships are actually an important part of making characters feel believable and real. I just can’t bring myself to care very much about the world collapsing in a black hole if I don’t care about the people who would be affected by it, you see.

Mogwitch
Mogwitch
2 years ago

I am completely unsurprised that MGTOWs exclude books wriiten by women; I’ve always assumed they share a box-set of 1950s sit-coms and a collection of vintage tracts from the John Birch Society as their sole external source of information on the outside world.

I’d be very surprised they read anything by non-MGTOW men either. From their comments online they never read more than the headlines of articles, and often barely comprehend those. Also, they have developed such idiosyncratic forms of grammar, spelling and specialised vocabulary – they have their own definition of “satire”, for example – that it surely suggests a dialect arising from isolation from everyday English.

Citerior Motive
Citerior Motive
2 years ago

You really should read Jane Austen—she’s a brilliant satirist.

Vbob
Vbob
2 years ago

I wonder if any of the boys have read Lois M. Bujold’s “Ethan of Athos” – with a whole planet of ‘no girls allowed’ they might not even notice that the hero is a woman….

Kat, ambassador of the feminist government in exile
Kat, ambassador of the feminist government in exile
2 years ago

They have their own definition of “satire”

And I’m sure that Webster’s is on the verge of adding the MGTOW definition:

satire: a claim that automatically receives a get-out-of-jail-free card

Who?
Who?
2 years ago

I always be thankful to my mother that when I was young, Enid Blyton and Astrid Lindgreen were two of the writers my mother introduced me, to.
There are toons of great female writers (look at the Hugo, we had a nearly all womenyear of winners recently), so if you miss them your loose.
The world is so big that you can read what you want so yeah.
(I think most of the stuff I read and like is not for them, because most works have interesting female characters in it)

Moggie
Moggie
2 years ago

These guys ought to read Ann Leckie’s Imperial Radch trilogy, and try to figure out the genders of the characters.

Victorious Parasol
Victorious Parasol
2 years ago

I wonder if MGTOWs would ever read anything JK Rowling published under her male pseudonym? Or perhaps we could introduce them to the works of Currier Bell?

Mogwitch
Mogwitch
2 years ago

@Kat – re:definition of satire. Exactly!

Bystander
Bystander
2 years ago

He’s got a point, though. Female authors do tend to explore the interpersonal aspect of a story more than – and sometimes at the expense of – the actual plot.

Two cases in point off the top of my head: Rowling’s Harry Potter books and Hobbs’ … well, all of her books. Yes, we get it, the angst is real. Now on with the story, please. (And these are series I actually like enough to own, as opposed to… say … Twilight.)

As to women writing flat male characters, I can’t agree with that. Unbelievable male characters, maybe, but not flat. (Looking at Snape and Fitz there, mostly, in the above examples.)

On the subject of self-help…gender matters. Any advice a woman gives me on how to be a better man is going to be taken with more than a few grains of salt.

Passagère clandestine
Passagère clandestine
2 years ago

Two cases in point off the top of my head: Rowling’s Harry Potter books and Hobbs’ … well, all of her books. Yes, we get it, the angst is real. Now on with the story, please.

That’s what I kept thinking when reading Jane Deana Salinger’s most well known book.

Any advice a woman gives me on how to be a better man is going to be taken with more than a few grains of salt.

Perfect. Please make sure that every woman around you is aware of this.

j
j
2 years ago

I was supposed to lurk but…

Gender doesn’t matter in self-help, it’s the objective. It’s pretty obvious if a woman is aiming for a happy, good man or if she’s aiming for her personal fantasy man. Then again I just don’t even look at the author name.

Iseult The Idle
Iseult The Idle
2 years ago

Iseult, I’m pretty sure Heathcliff is one of the main characters in Jane Austen’s Curse of the Time Traveling Space Spiders.

/em Runs screaming into the night.

Mogwitch
Mogwitch
2 years ago

“That’s what I kept thinking when reading Jane Deana Salinger’s most well known book.”
Ha!
Actually there have been so many great responses on this thread, I wish I could send muffins to you all.
Cormac McCarthy and Ernest Hemingway are both supposed to be manly authors for manly men to read, and they are all emotion, bugger-all plot. Even if the emotion is barely emoted in dialogue.

Violet the Vile, Moonbat Screech Junky
Violet the Vile, Moonbat Screech Junky
2 years ago

While I’m a massive Austen fan, I’ve always found Curse of the Time Travelling Space Spiders to be a little overrated, to be honest.

I much prefer Mystery of Skull Beach (you know, the one where the two older Bennett sisters team up with Miss Havisham to find Captain Flint’s treasure)

Re the OPs

*sigh*

Yes, whatever. I’m sure all the bestselling female authors will read your badly spelled opinions and cry all the way to the bank

Malitia
Malitia
2 years ago

I know Harry Potter only came up in passing, but that’s a series I couldn’t finish. I mean, it just shot its own message for me. “Yes! Oppression is bad! (…) Now lets ignore the oppressed almost entirely so the privileged can save them from the privileged, who think they aren’t oppressive enough.” Why is mutual destruction not an option? :/

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