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From the Archives: Candace Owens meets Gamergate — and things get weird

Candace Owens: Has a thing for terrible dudes

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By David Futrelle

Candace Owens — self-proclaimed “Red Pill Black” conservative — is having a bit of a moment, hanging out with new Trump fan Kanye West, posing for selfies with Don Jr., getting an effusive Twitter shout-out from Don Sr,, threatening to sue people who talk about her in what she considers the wrong way.

A lot of people have been left wondering just where exactly Owens came from. Well, there’s a bit of a story there.

Long-time readers of this blog first met Owens back in the days of Gamergate, after Zoe Quinn criticized her ill-conceived plan for an “anti-bullying” site that would have basically doxed a bunch of teenagers. After Quinn spoke out, Gamergaters spouting conspiracy theories quickly abandoned their own critiques of Owens and  rallied around her. Owens began spouting conspiracy theories of her own, and, well, let’s just say things got very weird very fast, as they generally seem to do when Owens gets involved in anything.

In several posts, I tried my best to make sense of the whole surreal mess. I’m linking them here because I think they may illuminate a few things about Trump World’s newest heroine.

Social Autopsy founder Candace Owens channels GamerGate in bizarre attack on Zoe Quinn (APRIL 20, 2016)

This post describes what happened immediately after Owens first heard from Quinn. Trust me, the headline (and the snippet from the post below) don’t fully capture the weirdness of the story.

Instead of listening to Quinn, Owens declared war on her, spewing forth dozens of angry and accusatory tweets, charging that Quinn and fellow anti-harassment activist Randi Harper … were somehow the puppetmasters behind a barrage of abusive, threatening, and often blatantly racist anonymous messages that Owens (who is black) started getting not long after news of Owens’ plans hit Reddit and 4chan.

Owens quickly began to sound like every other internet crackpot who sees conspiracies in every Twitter mention.

SocialAutopsy-Turvy: Candace Owens’ Twitter Trainwreck, Part One
 (APRIL 24, 2016)

And quite a trainwreck it was. The story continued to get weirder, and at such a pace that I never had a chance to write part two.

In furious post, SocialAutopsy’s Candace Owens attacks a WashPo story that isn’t there APRIL 25, 2016

In this episode, Owens writes an angry diatribe against an article she imagined that Washington Post writer Caitlin Dewey had written about her. No, really. She accused Dewey and her editor of attempting to libel her in an article that the Post never published and that as far as I know Dewey never even wrote.

Giddy Gamergater: Will Candace Owens show the world that we’ve been right all along? (APRIL 28, 2016)

Naturally, Gamergaters were thrilled to have such an, er, original thinker on their side.

NOTE TO READERS: Sorry for being MIA the last couple of days; I’ve been dealing with the double whammy of migraines and some really nasty lower back pain. Doing a little better today.

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Weird (and tired of trumplings) Eddie
Weird (and tired of trumplings) Eddie
3 years ago

https://imgur.com/a/z7aUwfy

“I didn’t do it… it wasn’t me….”

Moggie
Moggie
3 years ago

“A big dog did it and ran away”

Katamount
Katamount
3 years ago

@brony

All of that is extremely useful! I’ve definitely used number 5 to turn the tables on sea lions (“If I go and get you links that demonstrate what I’m saying, will you consider them in good faith and modify your views accordingly? If no, I’m not going to waste my time.”) The issue that I have is where and when these can be deployed with maximum efficiency.

If I were to imagine my perfect world, somebody with enough standing to get Jordan Peterson’s attention would use his “free speech” malarkey against him by demanding an audience to discuss the underpinning of his whole schtick: the law in Canada as it pertains to free speech. It’s unlikely he’d agree to one under less than favourable conditions, but if prepared, that shouldn’t matter. Then once in front of the camera, just rip right into how wrong he was with all the snark you can muster. Use his “slap you silly” tweet against him. Bring up the Constitution and use it in concern with the social contract to demonstrate the need for responsibility in speech alongside freedom. He’ll try to martyr himself as some kind of free speech warrior, but if you keep it to what bill C-16 actually did, you should be able to keep him flustered and sputtering because legally he doesn’t have a leg to stand on.

Peterson is used to the deference of professorial entitlement. The people he talks to either let him drone on, or haven’t caught on to his game. If I could handle my anxiety, I could probably do it (as anybody with a Grade 11 Law credit can), but I don’t have the standing to get his attention. And that’s the part I don’t know what to do about.

Dvärghundspossen
Dvärghundspossen
3 years ago

Trying to catch up with this thread and yeah, had a conservative Facebook acquaintance post a while ago a Peterson video going “you have to watch the entire video to get it, but he’s so incredibly deep and smart” and I’m like uh no thanks.

In an actual academic paper there’s an ABSTRACT at the beginning which takes a couple of minutes to read and will give you an idea of the main arguments and the conclusion, and whether you’ll find the whole thing interesting or not. And if you do find it interesting and decide to read the whole thing, it won’t take hours. Making super long youtube videos and demand that people watch the whole thing or else they can’t criticize you isn’t an academia thing, it’s just… a shitty thing. Yeah not gonna sit there listening through his videos.

Dvärghundspossen
Dvärghundspossen
3 years ago

Btw I think there are valid critiques to be had about certain aspects of “identity politics” or “social justice” or whatever you wanna call it. I think it can go awry sometimes. But going “it’s all bullshit” is really throwing the baby out with the bathwater.

Katamount
Katamount
3 years ago

Oh hey, Wonkette absorbed our discussion here via osmosis! the same way everyone has heard about that asshole Peterson! https://wonkette.com/633856/wonksplainer-who-is-jordan-peterson-and-why-is-he-the-worst

Oh man, that is just gold.

Dvärghundspossen
Dvärghundspossen
3 years ago

Oh wow. After reading that blog post I feel like I know more about Peterson than I ever wanted to know.

Weird (and tired of trumplings) Eddie
Weird (and tired of trumplings) Eddie
3 years ago

Thanx, Katamount

🙂

… so, if I have my JordanPeterson-ness straight, I, as a cis-het, xian (by upbringing, anyway), white, male, am a unique individual, possessed of many, unique, enduring (if not endearing) characteristics….

… all-a-the-rest-a-you are members of monolithic groups, all possessed of the same characteristics… which are mostly bad.

I get that right?

Dvärghundspossen
Dvärghundspossen
3 years ago

Weird Eddie: What does “xian” mean in this context? I tried to google it, but I just got a Chinese city.

Rhuu - apparently an illiterati
Rhuu - apparently an illiterati
3 years ago

Christian, replacing the ‘Christ’ with an ‘x’.

Dvärghundspossen
Dvärghundspossen
3 years ago

Aha! Thanks for the explanation.

CNS
CNS
3 years ago

Well mammothers, you’ve just sent me down a Jordan Peterson rabbithole; I’ve only resurfaced after reading an interview with him where he condemns Frozen as “the subjugation of art to propaganda” and states he could barely sit through it. That’s a pretty highflautin way to be offended by a cartoon about two sisters.

Brony, Social Justice Cenobite

@Katamount
Efficiency is definitely an issue and I think it’s often related to percieved in-group identity. Sadly a person with “enough standing” is a person percieved to be in-group. This requires someone like me (cis, male, white…) to be actively involved in situations as long as the benefits of being in the in-group are relevant (hopefully that benefit is short lived). So I’m more likely to get Jordan Peterson’s attention simply because I’ve been raised in a similar cultural situation. I’m more likely to be able to appeal to his ego or whatever is required to get him to respond to me because I have access to information associated with a similar upbringing.
I wish this wasn’t the case because as an outsider I believe you are able to better objectify problems associated with our psychology. The problem is that as an outsider you face more resistance which requires my help (a cultural flaw). In the long term we will fix this, but for now we need the Hbomberguy’s and the like until that bond is broken.

Peterson can appeal to professional entitlement all he wants because the quality of such depends on how well he can make it relevant to ALL OF US.

weirwoodtreehugger: chief manatee

Today in misandry. I’m watching CBS evening news and they said that the latest US birthrate figures have the birthrates down in every demographic except women in their 40’s.

Jenora Feuer
Jenora Feuer
3 years ago

@Dvärghundspossen, Rhuu:
Strictly speaking, it’s not supposed to actually be the Latin ‘x’ but the Greek chi or ‘χ’, as that’s the first letter of the Greek Christos, or ‘Χριστός’, meaning “the anointed one”. (Yes, it’s a title, not a name.)

Mentioned because there are often loud Christians with no sense of history complaining that ‘Xmas’ is trying to take the Christ out of Christmas, despite the fact that the source for that abbreviation was that it was using the initial of the original word in its original language.

Mish of the Catlady Ascendancy
Mish of the Catlady Ascendancy
3 years ago

Everyone must share my pain and also laugh with me at this JP comic that someone made. It’s actually well-drawn (imho) but it takes cringy fandom to even cringier levels (it’s absolutely not satire or irony, in case you were wondering):

comment image

Cain to Able ahahahahahaha

Mish of the Catlady Ascendancy
Mish of the Catlady Ascendancy
3 years ago

The artist has also done one where a brave Kanye is attacked by lefties and saved by the God Emperor…

Ooglyboggles
Ooglyboggles
3 years ago

@Mish
ahahahhahahahahhahahahahhahaahahhahahahhahahah

PeeVee the Tired
PeeVee the Tired
3 years ago
Catalpa
Catalpa
3 years ago

Strictly speaking, it’s not supposed to actually be the Latin ‘x’ but the Greek chi or ‘χ’, as that’s the first letter of the Greek Christos, or ‘Χριστός’, meaning “the anointed one”. (Yes, it’s a title, not a name.)

Mentioned because there are often loud Christians with no sense of history complaining that ‘Xmas’ is trying to take the Christ out of Christmas, despite the fact that the source for that abbreviation was that it was using the initial of the original word in its original language.

Wouldn’t the original language for Christianity be something like Hebrew, not Greek? /doesn’t actually know

Dalillama: Irate Social Engineer

@Catalpa
It is quite likely that the original language of the new testament was Aramaic, a successor language of Hebrew, but the oldest extant texts are in Greek.

Catalpa
Catalpa
3 years ago

Oh, neat! Thanks, Dalillama, I learned something new today!

kupo
kupo
3 years ago

Owens is being really misogynistic on Twitter right now (shocking, I know).

https://twitter.com/RealCandaceO/status/997165058122813440?s=19

Interesting theory presented to me at lunch. Do you guys think something bio-chemically happens to women who don’t marry and/or have children?

Evidentiary support: @chelseahandler @kathygriffin @SarahKSilverman

I feel like what I said was pretty clear. I was having a convo with someone at lunch and they suggested that women who never marry, don’t adopt and/or have children of their own become bitter over time.
I asked my followers for their thoughts. Leftists are melting. https://t.co/vnZxDfBX0j

This emotionally-charged response to a simple question indicates that you likely want kids.
Thank you for the feedback. https://t.co/xu3TtBHEc2

idli sambar
idli sambar
3 years ago

Owens probably isn’t married with kids herself and considering the statistics, has a high probability of never being. Lauren Southern was another one caught shaming non-traditional, non-married women without kids, all while being non-trad, single and childless herself. It’s a common (wo)manosphere trope. Although statistically speaking Southern has a better chance than Owens right now (if she moves fast), in another decade stats will probably show both of their demographics on par in singledom, childlessness in the 30’s-40’s age range. For Owens, Karazin recommends swirling to increase her chances of that trad family life she seems to be espousing (while not living it).

I vaguely recall an old documentary of that Alex Jones guy storming some secret place in California where (male only) heads of state gather to run around naked and engage in weird rituals like burning an effigy of CARE.

Did anyone notice in the lower left corner there was an ad for free podcasts using a picture of Teal Swan?!

idli sambar
idli sambar
3 years ago

Do you mean that you never mentioned Hinduism in this thread? Because that would be correct. But I can access the archives, you know. I remember this thread.
https://wehuntedthemammoth.com/2018/05/02/mgtow-creepos-wonder-does-feminism-promote-bestiality/comment-page-1/#comment-2095794

Except I there’s no “hindu” word there, in either my quotes, or the person I’m quoting. But I already went through this like 2 weeks ago. No more.

Because white, cishet, Christian and male aren’t identities. They’re the default setting. Everyone else is a deviation from the norm, therefore they have identities and white cishet Christian men don’t. So advocating for white cishet Christian men is not identity politics.

They seem to be gearing up for 2040 when it will be identity politics.

That’s how it goes with most pseudo-intellectuals: bury people in jargon and “isms”, but with just enough bread crumbs to reach a trite truism. It’s the Deepak Chopra SOP.

Hold on now. As trite and attention seeking Deepak can be at times with his bubblegum pop version of Vedanta for dummies, I still find his books infinitely deeper (and better articulated) than anything I’ve heard Peterson say.

Has anyone watched the Wild Wild Country documentary on Netflix?

idli sambar
idli sambar
3 years ago

Except I there’s no “hindu” word there, in either my quotes, or the person I’m quoting.

Actually, you didn’t quote me at all. In the link you provided I don’t say anything. I just merely copy and pasted Prabhupada’s words. And there’s no “Hinduism” in them either.

MissEB47 (Resident Rainbow Lorikeet and Beak Typist)
MissEB47 (Resident Rainbow Lorikeet and Beak Typist)
3 years ago

WWTH-

They said that the latest US birthrate figures have the birthrates down in every demographic except women in their 40’s.

And that’s bad?!?! The world is overpopulated. How the hell is a lower birthrate a bad thing? All it means is that we have got things under control. Nothing to worry about. But women choosing what to do with their wombs is misandry, of course.

Lumipuna (nee Arctic Ape)
Lumipuna (nee Arctic Ape)
3 years ago

Strictly speaking, it’s not supposed to actually be the Latin ‘x’ but the Greek chi or ‘χ’, as that’s the first letter of the Greek Christos, or ‘Χριστός’, meaning “the anointed one”. (Yes, it’s a title, not a name.)

Mentioned because there are often loud Christians with no sense of history complaining that ‘Xmas’ is trying to take the Christ out of Christmas, despite the fact that the source for that abbreviation was that it was using the initial of the original word in its original language.

For the longest time, I sort of subconsciously assumed that the Latin letter ‘x’ was a stand-in for ‘cross’, which again would be stand-in for ‘Christ’. It was a slip-in from my native Finnish, where the word risti (cross) is derived from Kristus (Christ, as seen in crucifixes). Why, it makes perfect sense!

Lumipuna (nee Arctic Ape)
Lumipuna (nee Arctic Ape)
3 years ago

Wouldn’t the original language for Christianity be something like Hebrew, not Greek? /doesn’t actually know

AFAIK, Jesus and his followers used Aramaic for everyday business and for their revising of Jewish religious tradition. Aramaic was a Semitic language that in the previous centuries had replaced Hebrew as the the native language of Palestinian Jews, and was also spoken by many other peoples in that region. The Jews still used Hebrew for religious ritual and scholarship.

By late first century, a major formative period of Christian teaching, many/most Christians were from non-Aramaic backgrounds across the Mediterranean, often native Greek speakers, and Greek had certainly become the most commonly understood lingua franca in Christian community.

Early Christian writing was done largely in Greek, but also in Aramaic, Coptic, Hebrew, etc., and there was some early translating back and forth. The later standardization of books that became the New Testament was done in Greek, selecting almost entirely original Greek writing (some of it had been translated from Aramaic text that was since lost).

So Christianity was developed in several languages, but mostly Greek.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ lumipuma

Jesus and his followers used Aramaic

Yeah, we know that because the early Greek gospels actually quote some of the Aramaic and then provide a translation.

I seem to recall that ‘Eloi Eloi Lama Sabuchani’ (sp?) is one of them (My god my god, why have you forsaken me)

Source: O level RE! The synoptic gospels was part of the syllabus.

Lumipuna (nee Arctic Ape)
Lumipuna (nee Arctic Ape)
3 years ago

Yeah, we know that because the early Greek gospels actually quote some of the Aramaic and then provide a translation.

Ah, didn’t know that.

Valentin - Emigrantski Ragamuffin
Valentin - Emigrantski Ragamuffin
3 years ago

Except I there’s no “hindu” word there, in either my quotes, or the person I’m quoting.

Actually, you didn’t quote me at all. In the link you provided I don’t say anything. I just merely copy and pasted Prabhupada’s words. And there’s no “Hinduism” in them either.

idly, you quote and reply to yourself now?

Catalpa
Catalpa
3 years ago

@ Idli

You want quotes? Sure!

Lecture on Srimad-Bhagavatam 2.9.9, Informal Class in Room, 25 April 1972

“Bhagavata Purana also known as Śrīmad Bhāgavata Mahā Purāṇa, Śrīmad Bhāgavatam or Bhāgavata, is one of Hinduism’s eighteen great Puranas.”

-Wikipedia

Emphasis mine.

To paraphrase someone else in that thread (which is why I linked the thread instead of quoting, to provide context) saying that your linked post never mentioned Hinduism is like me saying “Hey, this guy giving a lecture on the Book of Matthew is saying some super sexist shit! …What? No, my post had absolutely nothing to do with Christianity! I never mentioned Christianity!”

There’s plenty of words that can refer to a religion without actually mentioning the name of that religion. But yes, you are correct that we did go through this 2 weeks ago.

Mish of the Catlady Ascendancy
Mish of the Catlady Ascendancy
3 years ago

@PeeVee, ah the dramatic reading!!! It’s hilarious. “Wait a minute. Does he have six fingers?” 😀

For the longest time, I sort of subconsciously assumed that the Latin letter ‘x’ was a stand-in for ‘cross’, which again would be stand-in for ‘Christ’. It was a slip-in from my native Finnish, where the word risti (cross) is derived from Kristus (Christ, as seen in crucifixes). Why, it makes perfect sense!

That’s fascinating. I love that kind of detail.

Dvärghundspossen
Dvärghundspossen
3 years ago

And that’s bad?!?! The world is overpopulated. How the hell is a lower birthrate a bad thing? All it means is that we have got things under control. Nothing to worry about. But women choosing what to do with their wombs is misandry, of course.

This is a bit complicated because our economies are completely based around a continuously growing or at least not shrinking population. At the same time, for the sake of the environment, it would be great of populations began to shrink, primarily in the western world since we’re the ones doing the most of the depletion of the planet’s resources and emit the most greenhouse gases, with the US as the number one offender.

Mish of the Catlady Ascendancy
Mish of the Catlady Ascendancy
3 years ago

@bluecat

I’ve only just seen your post after reading back through this thread, so I don’t know if you’ll even see this, but I’m so sorry to hear the bad health news (and the bad financial news). I hope you’re both coping as well as you can, and that the festival gives you some fun relief. Hugs.

idli sambar
idli sambar
3 years ago

No Catalpa, I don’t want wiki quotes. You said “I” bashed Hinduism. So quote me bashing Hinduism then. My original post mentioned The Hare Krishnas, who by the way are not Hindu. You may be under the impression that they are, but that impression is wrong. You obviously missed the post where I explained all this. Just let it go.

idli sambar
idli sambar
3 years ago

Valentin, sigh, it’s called a “correction”, after the edit time is up.

And that’s bad?!?! The world is overpopulated. How the hell is a lower birthrate a bad thing? All it means is that we have got things under control. Nothing to worry about. But women choosing what to do with their wombs is misandry, of course.

This is a bit complicated because our economies are completely based around a continuously growing or at least not shrinking population. At the same time, for the sake of the environment, it would be great of populations began to shrink, primarily in the western world since we’re the ones doing the most of the depletion of the planet’s resources and emit the most greenhouse gases, with the US as the number one offender.

I was thinking all about that yesterday because NPR had a segment discussing how the US birth rate is now carried by immigrants because citizens who were born here just aren’t having enough kids at population replacement rates.

Jenora Feuer
Jenora Feuer
3 years ago

@Catalpa, et al:
As others have noted, the language under which Christianity most became a thing was Greek (it was a major tongue for trade and academic discussion at the time). And, as I noted, the word ‘Christ’ itself comes from Greek.

For that matter, ‘Jesus’ is basically the Latin transliteration of the Greek transliteration of the original name; to my understanding, a more direct transliteration of the original would probably be something like Yeshua.

The more modern transliteration of the same name would be ‘Joshua’.

(Now remember the old movie War Games, where the pacifist scientist nick-named his extremely powerful computer after his dead son Joshua… yeah, I would be very surprised if that name choice weren’t deliberate by the writers.)

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ jenora

the original would probably be something like Yeshua.

Surviving records from the time indicate that around one in four men was called Yeshua back then. So all those “We’ve found Jesus’s tomb/ossuary/credit card!” stories need to be taken with a pinch of salt.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

I would be very surprised if that name choice weren’t deliberate by the writers.

There’s loads of subtle little things in War Games. Next time you watch it, see how many references to the people in charge of the nuclear being stoners you can spot.

Jenora Feuer
Jenora Feuer
3 years ago

Well, yes, Yeshua was a pretty common name. Even just narrowing it to ‘known itinerant preachers in the right time period’ still leaves a non-unitary set.

And War Games is a favourite movie of mine, if for no other reason than it has one of the most accurate depictions of hacking ever put to screen: mostly boring stuff, trying random things until something works, finding things left open because someone thought obscurity was enough security, social engineering, and research into ‘what would this person have likely used as a password he could remember’?

MrsObedMarsh
MrsObedMarsh
3 years ago

Yesterday NPR played a recording of a recent talk Candace Owens gave at a university and I listened to some of it. She made the standard conservative claim that leftists don’t have the facts on their side and only “reason” emotionally – she and her allies always make decisions based on logic and facts, of course. Then during the Q&A session, a guy asked her to give her thoughts on QAnon and she dodged the question with “I haven’t read much of them” before moving on.

Now, you’d expect a person who’s committed to rationality to use that opportunity to explain that QAnon is peddling a conspiracy theory and that people are not attracted to conspiracy theories for logical reasons, but because they want to feel special – that they possess secret knowledge most people can’t understand and are fighting against a powerful evil cabal just by posting on the Internet. But I guess Owens doesn’t really care about rationality.

idli sambar
idli sambar
3 years ago

people are not attracted to conspiracy theories for logical reasons, but because they want to feel special

I don’t know about that. Doesn’t it start out wanting to get to the bottom of possible cover ups? Like in researching the JFK, MLK, X, etc assassinations and from there looking into other things?

Valentin - Emigrantski Ragamuffin
Valentin - Emigrantski Ragamuffin
3 years ago

looked like almost you are replying to yourself 🙃

but anyway it is still wrong because you did talked about the topic of Hinduism, as catlapa shows.

MrsObedMarsh
MrsObedMarsh
3 years ago

I don’t know about that. Doesn’t it start out wanting to get to the bottom of possible cover ups? Like in researching the JFK, MLK, X, etc assassinations and from there looking into other things?

Recent studies here and here find a link between a “self‐attributed need for uniqueness” and a belief in conspiracy theories. Uscinski and Parent have also found that conspiracy theories are more appealing to “losers” – that is, “People who have lost an election, money or influence [who] look for something to explain that loss.”

Not only do conspiracy theories appeal to the desire to feel unique, they also help people cope with horrible events outside of their control. If JFK and MLK Jr. were killed by a shadowy cabal and not a couple of angry randos with guns, then all we have to do is kick the cabal out of power and there won’t be any more political assassinations. If vaccines cause autism in children, we just have to get rid of vaccines and there won’t be any more children with autism. If 9/11 was an inside job, we just have to kick out the government conspirators and boom, no more terrorism. Simple solutions for simple problems, right?

In short, conspiracy theories are not about finding the real truth at all, just about feeling like you have.

Surplus to Requirements, Observer of the Vast Blight-Wing Enstupidation
Surplus to Requirements, Observer of the Vast Blight-Wing Enstupidation
3 years ago

@MrsObedMarsh:

Yesterday NPR played a recording of a recent talk Candace Owens gave at a university

Eww.

and I listened to some of it.

Oh, dear Ghu, why???

But I guess Owens doesn’t really care about rationality.

I don’t think any of them do, beyond the extent to which they can use pretension to it as a shield from criticism or a ladder to credibility.

MrsObedMarsh
MrsObedMarsh
3 years ago

Oh, dear Ghu, why???

My husband told me about it and I wanted to have a conversation about it. Laughing at dumb conservatives is one of those hobbies we share <3

Catalpa
Catalpa
3 years ago

@Ildi

The wiki quote was to provide context, since a large portion of this site is likely unfamiliar with the relationship between Śrīmad Bhāgavatam and Hinduism. The quote before that? About the Lecture on Śrīmad Bhāgavatam? This one?

Lecture on Srimad-Bhagavatam 2.9.9, Informal Class in Room, 25 April 1972

That one you wrote, in the comment that I linked. I left out the parts about how a guy lecturing about the Srimad Bhagavatam thinks that syphilis is caused by women sleeping with dogs, because I didn’t really feel like repeating that part, and it was available in the link I provided. I quoted that snippet to prove that you indeed did mention Hinduism in previous threads (despite claiming not to), even if it was obliquely.

I’ll agree that this discussion is no longer productive. Interacting with you doesn’t really seem to be, in general. So I’ll stop, sure.

idli sambar
3 years ago

but anyway it is still wrong because you did talked about the topic of Hinduism, as catlapa shows.

They did no such thing.

The comment may have been deleted by David but I had quoted some pretty horrible things about women said by the leader of the Hare Krishna society. I also kind of warned people to do some research into this sort of stuff before they get involved with that society, if they were thinking to. From there someone said I was bashing Hinduism even though none of the quotes were from a hindu or a hindu scripture, but from the leader of the society, named Prabhupada, who has made it clear to the world and to his followers that he is not a hindu and that his teachings are not hindu. If Prabhupada reads a book that hindus also read that does not make him hindu. I’m not familiar with the book myself but even in the quotes I provided, the bad stuff was not from the book but from Prabhupada (who again, is not hindu).

The accusation that I bashed hindus (being proudly from a hindu family and culture myself) is ludicrous. If anything you should be mad at Prabhupada for giving hindus a bad name, since you and probably a lot of other non-hindus don’t know the difference.