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gynocentrism gynocracy homophobia men who should not ever be with women ever MGTOW misogyny reddit

97% of powerful women are lesbians pursuing a “clit-o-centric” agenda, man with obviously faulty gaydar declares

*Henny Youngman voice* That’s no lady … that’s my boss!

The Spring 2018 WHTM pledge drive is on! Please send money! Thanks! 

By David Futrelle

So I was taking a lazy Sunday stroll through the Men Going Their Own Way  subreddit when I spotted a post about life in our alleged “gynocratic hellscape.” That’s an automatic click for me.

To my surprise, the post turned out to be a weird attempt at MGTOW-spiration:

Remember as you look upon this gynocentric hellscape… 

…that this is what millions, perhaps even billions of men throughout history have died for. For men to be mocked, abused and disposed of. Don’t repeat their mistake.

Your name will not be remembered. Your sacrifices will not be honored. You will not see the fruits of your labor towards society.

Live and work only for yourself. Go your own way.

Very inspirational!

So inspirational, in fact, that it inspired one MGTOW brother to type out his own personal hot take on the hot-button issue of … lesbians, and why so many powerful women are (apparently) women who love women (in bed).

“You could estimate that the number of these women in power and moving up the ranks, at least in my sphere, are 97% dyke,” declared champagne-n-pompano.

Given that lesbians are basically Women Going Their Own Way (for real), you might think that Men Who Like to Say that They Are Going Their Own Way would have a certain level of professional respect for them. Not so much.

These women hate your guts for just being a man, and have no shame couching every single thought that crosses her mind within some gender paradigm. Every move they make, every decision has to first reflect the consideration of the clit-o-centric gods.

The what-o-whatric whats?

Just a few anecdotes while you guys sip your coffees this morning.

ESPN, Fox, the Golf Channel and the NHL channel ALL had females covering yesterdays highlights. Every channel I flipped to was a fucking bitch skreetching, chirping, and nasally whining the sports reports for us. No. Off.

Chirping?

The newspaper in my town has at least two stories, as always, shaming the community for allowing women to be abused and be denied positions of influence.

Two stories. TWO STORIES! How long must we men endure the crushing weight of our oppression?

My friend’s employer has four women in prominent roles in the company. In the last three years, two of them have divorced and come out as gay carpet munchers …

When the going gets tough, you don’t want a gay-carpet muncher. You want a GAY carpet-muncher.

… and the other two were newer “hot” moms, thrust up the ranks because of degrees they hold, while juggling new babies and family life, work life, which is always secondary to everything else they “gotta do”.

Anyway, these other two are now both divorcing their husbands. And he thinks they are also going dike.

Yes, and I’m sure his gaydar is FLAWLESS.

So all four of these women who were married when joining his company and thrust up the ranks posing as “hetero” breeders with wholesome families and college experiences and the glistening pieces of paper that says “Masters of C*nt” on them, they all shed their fake facades and go full butch.

Do … do a lot of schools offer Masters f C*nt programs these days? It’s been a while since I was in school.

Just a massive barn fire of shit. lol

Yes, I’m sure that’s what your life is.

Someone called ManGoingtoTOWn stepped up to provide his explanation for the alleged Lesbian Ascendency.

Lesbians are so prominent in society because they are masculinized. They actually have ambition.

Look at trans women. These are men who turn into women. Trans women dominate women in whatever field they are in. Women are now complaining that trans women are taking over women’s groups. LOL.

That’s because masculinized humans are more ambitious.

Testosterone counts.

I love that song by Depeche Mode!

Not so sure about the rest of his theory.

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Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
2 years ago

@ binjabreel

The North Sea is tricky because it goes below and above water at different times of history

Doggerland (or as I like to call it, East East Yorkshire) is fascinating. Trawlers pull stuff up all the time. One titbit I like, is that the White Cliffs of Dover were still around back then; but as an escarpment. I can well envisage they were an important landmark for people walking across the channel back in the day. Also back then, the Thames and the Rhein were just tributaries of the same river. Puts Brexit into perspective.

Silverpit may well be a salt deposit collapse; but it does appear to have a central peak, so I put all my faith in that.

It looks like there may be a few craters from around the same time as the KT/2 impact, and all within a relatively narrow band of latitude. Which does support the multiple impact theory. Especially after Levy-Shoemaker 9.

Moggie
Moggie
2 years ago

Binjabreel:

How do you make sense of a *sound so loud it would kill you from 100 miles away*?

That is so fucking metal!

Alan:

Especially after Levy-Shoemaker 9.

Is it silly that I felt privileged to be alive to witness the SL9 Jupiter impact? From time to time, an event comes along which stuns me with how awesome the cosmos is, and that was one of those. And then there was this, from Rosetta:

Robert Walker-Smith
Robert Walker-Smith
2 years ago

Alan Robertshaw, Doggerland also fascinates me. I imagine a Doggerland r gaffer telling his granddaughter, ‘Ya, me old da told me when I was your age that he could remember when that bit o’ land went a long ways further out to sea. Seems like all tha old landmarks are bein’ swallowed up an’ goin’ away. Mebbe the sea’s takin’ the land away?’

And the village elders did NOT appreciate that kind of talk.

Kevin
Kevin
2 years ago

Start reading to be appalled by the miggy, stay for the volcano and meteorite impact discussion.

Fruitloopsie
Fruitloopsie
2 years ago

Clit-o-centric Lesbian Goddesses is my new band name.

Jesalin: Clit-o-centric Lesbian Goddess
Jesalin: Clit-o-centric Lesbian Goddess
2 years ago

@Fruitloopsie

Yoink

idli sambar revolution
idli sambar revolution
2 years ago

Jules, no. Ugh. I turned on the radio about 10 minutes into the show so didn’t get the name of it. I’ve been searching but can’t find. They always say for more tune into our podcast at our website but couldn’t find there either. Maybe I’m a bad searcher. But it was the best mainstream coverage of the Manosphere and it’s multi directional tentacles that I’ve ever heard. I posted more about it in the first comment of this thread but it hasn’t been released from moderation yet. I think David doesn’t see it or just kept it in moderation cause the comment was addressed to him. I think he should go on NPR because they are going to be covering more manosphere there.

We owe Frankenstein (and thus maybe the development of the whole sci-fi genre) to volcanoes too

And a woman (going her own literary way).

Moggie
Moggie
2 years ago

We might have a fresh influx of commenters, shortly. Scalzi made a blog post about incels today, and a commenter mentioned David and WHTM.

Moon_custafer
Moon_custafer
2 years ago

@ Binjabreel, Moggie:

How do you make sense of a *sound so loud it would kill you from 100 miles away*?

That is so fucking metal!

Hotblack Desiato’s new solo album?

opposablethumbs
opposablethumbs
2 years ago

Re Doggerland aka East East Yorkshire –

I seem to remember reading about surveys of the seabed done in relatively recent years (using georadar or something like that, that can “see” below the surface of the seabed. Like they do for oil exploration …??? But I don’t remember properly) which showed – or at least strongly suggested – that the flooding event could have been sudden and catastrophic, like a dam bursting. (if not the entire area/event, a major part of it) Apparently there are signs of violent gouging cut into the seabed such as would have been left by half-a-sea’s worth of water suddenly ripping across the landscape.

Does that ring any bells with anyone …?

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
2 years ago

@ opposablethumbs

Does that ring any bells with anyone …?

Indeed it does. The theory is that there was one last bit of chalk, around where the Straights of Dover/Pas de Calais, are today, that suddenly collapsed and flooded what is now the bit of the North Sea opposite the east coast of England. There’s even a name for this sort of event. That I cannot for the life of me remember; but it’s what may have happened in the Black Sea (think it’s that one), and possibly the Pillars of Hercules.

ETA: Oh, it’s just ‘deluge event’.

idli sambar revolution
idli sambar revolution
2 years ago

Reposting

David, I hope you read this. Did you hear NPR today? A 45 minute segment dedicated to the Manosphere. Summer (forgot his first name) was interviewed and he touched on practically the entire Manosphere from Incel to MGTOW to MRA to PUA to AltRight to AltLight and how and where all of this intersects. A conversation about where Jordan Peterson fits in (or doesn’t) ensued. And George Sodini (remember him?) as well as Stephan Molyneaux was brought up. Then in the second half Michael Kimmel was interviewed. It was a very good, thorough and well summarized segment.
One point Kimmel or Summer (forget which one) brings up is that most of the Manosphere guys that he’s interviewed fall into what he called the “center democrat” position politically. They are, according to him, uncomfortable with Trump and his attitudes policies around immigration, and they see him as buffering the elite wealthy class while not doing anything for middle class and poor Americans (like them). They want class and economic equality, at least equality of opportunity, YET in relationships they want to have a sort of privileged patriarchy.
Have you found anything like this in your own years of researching the Manosphere?
Anyway, try find it on their website and maybe write to them and ask to be interviewed the next time they do a Manosphere segment, because this is going to be an ongoing thing.

Binjabreel
Binjabreel
2 years ago

@moggie
Nah, it’s not weird. Think about it- the odds of the comet impact happening during a lifetime are spectacularly small. And the odds that a bunch of talking apes a billion miles away would be able to even know it happened and actually *watch* it? Even smaller.

@opposablethumbs
So the current guess is that when the Mediterranean re-filled during human history, there are some signs that the initial part would have happened quite suddenly. They think it might have happened as quickly as a couple months to a couple years, with sea levels going up as much as ten feet a day.

Because scientists are killjoys, the catastrophic version of the Zanclean flood (that’s what this was called) was controversial for a long time and a lot of them insisted that it was impossible. Except in 2016 we found a giant singular deposit of sediment that was like 100 km long and 200 km wide and almost 1km thick in places, that looks like it was washed up against a giant underwater cliff escarpment near like Sicily or Malta or somewhere all in one go.

So it was probably fekkin spectacular.

opposablethumbs
opposablethumbs
2 years ago

Just the thought of witnessing something like that, like the Med or Doggerland or the Black sea (if you were lucky enough to be safe on high ground at the time) …. Spectacular and awe-inspiring and terrifying to the power of n.

Are there places in the world where a deluge event like these is thought possible in the future?

kupo
kupo
2 years ago

@idli

Chirping?

He means tweeting.

Really? He turns on the TV and hears women tweeting the sports newscast? For reference:

ESPN, Fox, the Golf Channel and the NHL channel ALL had females covering yesterdays highlights. Every channel I flipped to was a fucking bitch skreetching, chirping, and nasally whining the sports reports for us. No. Off.

Stop ‘splaining. You’re clearly not reading for content.

Rhuu - apparently an illiterati
Rhuu - apparently an illiterati
2 years ago

I hate hate hate commenting on women’s voices as annoyingly high pitched. I hate it. My voice is higher than I’d like, and it gets higher when I’m excited or angry.

I was once telling a story (that I thought was pretty funny) and the dude I was telling it to interrupted me to tell me he couldn’t understand me when my voice got all high.

Like, dude, I wasn’t speaking in the realms that only dogs can hear!

Now I’m really self-conscious about it.

FUNNY STORY THOUGH, women’s voices are also the ones chosen to be computer voices because they are soothing???????

Logic??????

Re the OP: I definitely read ‘chirping’ as another word to make fun of how she was speaking. High pitched, and without sense.

Redsilkphoenix: Jetpack Vixen, FemiNest Collective agent, Hell Toupee keeper & Intergalactic Meanie
Redsilkphoenix: Jetpack Vixen, FemiNest Collective agent, Hell Toupee keeper & Intergalactic Meanie
2 years ago

I really need to study ancient geology things and their impact on human history/myths more. Fascinating stuff there. (Pumice rafts full of bones, or with bones on top of said rafts? Kewl!)

Things like an ancient Icelandic volcano being responsible for the creation of the Vikings (the fallout blocked the sun and killed the fields, leaving the survivors few options beyond ‘raid the neighbors for food and loot’. Plus lending imagery for the tales of Ragnarök and the end times.)

And an amateur archeologist trying to prove that ancient Ithaca isn’t the modern island with that name, but now a peninsula of a nearby island (a couple of cliffs fell down and created a land bridge between the islands.) And another amateur archaeologist who’s trying to prove the Mayans built stuff as far north as Georgia (there’s a couple of mountains there that look like they could have temples at their hearts.)

The ancient world is an fascinating as the stars are.

Binjabreel
Binjabreel
2 years ago

@opposablethumbs
Maaaaaybe?
A lot of those really spectacular floods were because the Ice age’s lowering sea level cut off various basins for long enough that they could dry out. The *really* spectacular ones required some coincidental geological feature to block the water as it rose back again, else it would just be a slow refilling.

If sea levels rise again, we’d see it, but probably not on the same scale. A lot of the meltwater was held back by ice dams and stuff (go look up the Missoula floods, which like scoured out all of eastern Oregon, Washington and Idaho) so the sea level changed surprisingly rapidly.

Modern candidates would be places like the Salton basin, if the gulf of California filled up enough for the basin to re-capture it along with the outflow of the Colorado.

Another one is the Atchafalaya (sp?) river valley. It’s been very, very close to capturing the Mississipi ever since we fucked up an engineering canal between it and another river nearby. If that happens, holy shit it will redirect something like 60-80% of the Mississippi outflow away from Louisiana and into the lowlands of eastern Texas.

Surplus to Requirements, Observer of the Vast Blight-Wing Enstupidation
Surplus to Requirements, Observer of the Vast Blight-Wing Enstupidation
2 years ago

The Zanclean flood was 5.33 million years ago. No humans were around yet then.

Binjabreel
Binjabreel
2 years ago

@redsilk

I recently got really obsessed with a lot of early human history. We know sooo little. And so much of what we THOUGHT we knew was utter bullshit filtered through what imperialistic Europeans thought had to be true.

One thing that my school history did a horrible job of driving home was the idea of just how many places there’ve pretty much always been people living. We think of folk being in like Greece and India and China and Mesopotamia and Mexico because those are the tiny areas that get colored in as “civilizations” on our school maps, when the reality is that by like 2000 BC there were people living literally everywhere from Africa to Europe to Asia to the Americas.

Binjabreel
Binjabreel
2 years ago

Not Homo sapiens, sure, but there were definitely hominids.

I was just using it as an example of a catastrophic flood event. Others, like the ice dam breaches & the flood events around the Black Sea and the rest of central Eurasia, along with the one that breached Dover, were definitely within the human species’ lifetime.

Dalillama: Irate Social Engineer

, when the reality is that by like 2000 BC there were people living literally everywhere from Africa to Europe to Asia to the Americas.

Not quite true; the habitable islands of the Pacific weren’t fully settled until ca. 1000 ya.

Surplus to Requirements, Observer of the Vast Blight-Wing Enstupidation
Surplus to Requirements, Observer of the Vast Blight-Wing Enstupidation
2 years ago

Nor Iceland. And of course there’s still no self-sustaining population in Antarctica, and weren’t even externally-supplied outposts there until a century ago.

Everywhere else on land though has had people for at least the last 8000 years or so, with southern Chile being the last of those places to be settled around that time. Outside of the areas labeled as “civilizations” in the texts, you’d find hunter-gatherers, fisher-gatherers, nomadic herders, and village horticulturalists. The areas labeled as “civilizations” are basically defined by the presence of larger, permanent stone buildings and (especially) written language of some form.

My own suspicion has been that a lot of those started when the herders would raid the horticulturalists. The herders had the “original sin” of patriarchy, as far as I can tell, having extended the idea of cattle as chattels to include women and children as chattels too. (The more serious animal-rights lefties will undoubtedly consider owning the cattle themselves to have been the original sin, rather than extending that to include some humans. I’m not 100% sure I disagree.) Notably, the first notion of property rights came from there, with cattle rustling likely the first ever property crime. The strong-father-as-herdsman form of patriarchy certainly must have originated with these.

In any event, obviously at some point this raiding led to the invention of a form of protection racket (in fact, the ur-protection-racket) where one such herding group would, in exchange for a regular tribute of food from the horticulturalists, defend it from the other herding groups. Thus a herding group went from “nomadic” to “ranching” and a two-stratum society developed with a race+class division between the herders, whose descendants became the ruling class (and eventually delegated the actual herding to subordinates), and the horticulturalists, whose descendants became the peasant farmer class. The ruling class continued also to give rise to the horse-riding warrior caste, hence why all feudal-type societies have tended to have the professional military come from the second-born-and-later sons of the noble families (with peasants of course conscripted to serve as the spear-carriers and cannon-fodder).

Once you have a complex stratified society with a tax-collecting ruling class you need to keep track of who belongs to which privileged-or-disprivileged group, you need to keep track of who owes or has paid taxes, you need to track a lot of things, and you need to enforce all of this, so you get numbers, reading and writing, censuses, laws and police, and all of the other social/informational trappings of civilization. And you need physical storage for all the food collected as tribute, so grain silos and what-not, which sets you on the road to large permanent building construction. Welcome to the Neolithic!

Oh, wait, what about temples, priests, and organized religion? Well, sooner or later you have a big enough area of land conquered that there’s a large interior that rarely if ever has to fear being raided. The protection racket breaks down then unless you can invent a new raider to fear. A supernatural raider to fear has the advantage that it can’t be disproved, so a priesthood warning everyone of the terrible fate that awaits them in the afterlife if they don’t play by the rules and that legitimates via “divine right” the ruling class’s privileges comes in really handy for keeping the peasants in line in the non-frontier regions. (Frontier regions tend to be happy to have authoritarian leadership even now — witness how border states are mostly deep-red states that are hawkish on immigration issues. There, the protection racket still works, six thousand years later.)

rugbyyogi
rugbyyogi
2 years ago

A number of higher education institutes do offer a Masters of C*nt degree, but students should be wary. Many of these programmes are not accredited. This matters little in terms of knowledge of C*nt, but graduates may not be able to find work in industries which require certification for liability purposes.

Dalillama
Dalillama
2 years ago

Nor Iceland.

True; I shouldn’t have limited my statement to Pacific islands. All habitable continents were thoroughly inhabited by ~8000 ya. (Antartica is not human-habitable in a societal sense; a self-sustaining Antarctic population is impossible). The last habitable* empty islands on Earth were settled from Portugal in the 1400s. (There are structures that some claim predate Portuguese occupation of the Azores, but there was certainly nobody there when they arrived, and it’s mot clear if the structures.in question are actually artificial, nor how old they are).

*Capable of sustaining a human population indefinitely

Lumipuna (nee Arctic Ape)
Lumipuna (nee Arctic Ape)
2 years ago

Are there places in the world where a deluge event like these is thought possible in the future?

IDK how much the sea level would need to rise but possibly less than 10 meters to flood the lower Don valley from Black Sea and breach into the Caspian basin. The Caspian Sea is currently a non-draining lake some 28 meters below sea level. Flooding it would cover hundreds of thousands of squre kms of land, mostly sparsely populated desert and steppe.

Lumipuna (nee Arctic Ape)
Lumipuna (nee Arctic Ape)
2 years ago

General introduction to outburst floods:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outburst_flood

These usually involve sudden emptying of lake basins and massive flash flooding downstream. Continental glaciers can become dams for huge lakes, that then collapse. The rising water behind dam may also breach a new outflow, as happened 425,000 years ago when the then glacially dammed North Sea broke through the Dover Strait.

Sometimes, the sea can break into empty lake basins below sea level in dry areas. These areas then become permanently inundated. The largest known such event involved the Mediterranean basin over 5 million years ago.

Oceanic tsunamis can be caused for example by earthquakes and undersea landslides. Large tsunamis often wreck and temporarily inundate low-lying coastal areas. Theoretically, a sudden collapse of a melting continental glacier into sea could cause both a gigantic tsunami, and a sudden permanent sea level rise by many meters.

Moggie
Moggie
2 years ago

rugbyyogi:

A number of higher education institutes do offer a Masters of C*nt degree, but students should be wary. Many of these programmes are not accredited. This matters little in terms of knowledge of C*nt, but graduates may not be able to find work in industries which require certification for liability purposes.

Thanks for the warning! Actually, I don’t think I’m ready for a Master’s; is a Bachelor of C*nt degree worthwhile?

Robert Walker-Smith
Robert Walker-Smith
2 years ago

The Gibraltar deluge event featured in one book of Julian May’s “Saga of Pliocene Exile”. Humans witness it due to the plot device of time travel, and the description is awe-inspiring.

One of the things that took me by surprise when reading about the late prehistoric Europeans – when the ancestors of the current Europeans got to Europe it was already inhabited. Anthropologists don’t know very much about whoever was living there. The idea of the area now known as Greece being settled by Greek-speaking invaders from the east who displaced or absorbed the non-Greek-speaking indigenous population really changes one’s perspective. The parallels between various proto-European religious pantheons becomes more explicable.

Rabid Rabbit
Rabid Rabbit
2 years ago

@Moggie

I can’t speak to the value of the Bachelor’s on its own, but if you think it’s possible you might want to move on to the Master’s eventually, it’s really worth going for the Honors in BDSM.

Jenora Feuer
Jenora Feuer
2 years ago

I remember reading at one point that the best explanation we have for the fact that there are sea-life fossils in the middle of the Australian outback is that at some point a chunk of the oceanic shelf (I think in the Indian Ocean) broke off as the Australian continental shelf moved over it. That piece of the oceanic shelf was denser than the surrounding mantle, and sank very slowly, but it sinking created a partial vacuum in the liquid rock above it; the net result was that central Australia was actually sucked down below sea level and got flooded.

Just think about it, a good part of a moving continent getting pulled underwater by a chunk of the ocean floor that it had run over.

Now realize that Australia isn’t the only place on Earth that has maritime fossils in areas that have been above sea level for all of recorded history…

Anybody who says scientists can’t understand grandeur certainly hasn’t talked to any geologists.

(I have two friends who were geologists by training, though neither really by eventual jobs. At one point they and some other friends were out at dinner, and the two of them ended up getting deep into geological jargon in a discussion. I turned to some of my other friends and said, ‘Ahh, so that’s what it sounds like when I start talking about computers.’

If everybody had those little moments of recognition that their internal life didn’t necessarily match other people’s internal lives, well, this site probably wouldn’t need to exist.)

NR
NR
2 years ago

I think he misunderstands, on principle, what lesbians are. He is clearly under the impression that I, as a lesbian, with a female partner, and a job, and a life, spend ALL my time thinking about cishet men and how I can make their lives miserable.

Sorry dude, lesbians just don’t think about you and your friends, Like, AT ALL.

weirwoodtreehugger: chief manatee

I’m afraid you’re wrong about that, NR. Everything in the entire world revolves around boners. Nothing any woman does has any other motive than either making boners happy or making boners sad. That’s just science!

Axecalibur: Middle Name Danger
Axecalibur: Middle Name Danger
2 years ago

going dike
go full butch

Were they lesbians masquerading as straights to get ahead, or straights going gay after achieving high station? It’s really not clear