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david has questions off topic

Off-Topic Question Time: Did a book ever ruin your life?

WTF did I just read?

I have a bit of an off-topic question for you all: Did a book ever ruin your life?

Well, maybe that’s overstating things a little, so let me rephrase: Did you ever read a book that had a giant effect on your life, only to realize later that this effect was basically a negative one? Maybe you read Ayn Rand in high school and became an insufferable junior Objectivist for a couple of years? Maybe you gobbled up conspiracy theory until it finally occurred to you that Reptilians aren’t the real problem with the world today? Maybe you read a book that inspired you to join a cult that you later had to extract yourself from painfully?

It doesn’t have to be this dramatic. I’m just wondering how many of you all have stories like these, and what these stories are.

I might have a little bit of an ulterior motive. But it’s a good one, honest!

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Dvärghundspossen
Dvärghundspossen
3 years ago

Re “the joys of sex”: Count me in among people who found it in their parents’ book shelf at a young age and read it. Or at least some of it. TJoS has this reputation of being so great and progressive, and maybe it was for its time, but there’s seriously a lot of problematic stuff in there too. I mean it was ages since I read it, but I still remember some things. Someone else pointed out that weird claim about men getting aroused when they see a horse from behind. But besides that, it also says that
– the best way to avoid getting raped is not to “encourage” any men unless you’re willing to follow through and have sex with them
– it holds up vaginal orgasm as an ideal for intercourse. Clit orgasm is for oral sex and petting, you’re supposed to have a vaginal orgasm when you fuck.
– if a woman is “frigid”, it’s possible that another woman might help her to reach orgasm better than a man could, but don’t worry, this does not mean you’re a weird lesbian! You can still be normal!

weirwoodtreehugger: chief manatee

Reason number approximately 6 billion that women are well within our rights to complain about harassment in public places. And why it’s not cool to tell a woman she needs to fight back.
http://dlisted.com/2018/04/10/t-j-miller-was-arrested-for-calling-in-a-fake-bomb-threat-on-a-train/#more-288051

This story about TJ Miller calling in a fake bomb threat on Amtrak has been making the rounds. What isn’t in the headlines. He did it to take revenge against a woman after she took exception to a comment he made about her hair.

That’s some next level entitlement there.

On the Joys of Sex. There was a board game based on the book. My childhood friend’s father was a board game collector and he had the game. I don’t remember that much about it but I do remember we would take it out and giggle at it sometimes.

varalys the dark
3 years ago

I’ve always been a horror fiend and back in the 80’s when I was in my early teens I read those by Shaun Hutson. Which always contained a lot of graphic sex along with all the graphic gore. Now, I hadn’t actually figured out I was a lesbian yet (took until I was 18 for me to cotton on) but I wasn’t really into the idea of heterosexuality either and I think those books just really warped my whole view of what hetero sex could lead too. So if you find yourself having a threesome you’ll get eaten alive by carnivorous slugs in the act and so on. I still have those books and reread a couple a few years ago, they are abysmal. I thought I was so edgy back then for reading them too. I have hidden them behind a stack of Fighting Fantasy gamebooks which still remain cool and awesome.

Dormousing_it
Dormousing_it
3 years ago

@Alan Robertshaw:

‘Watership Down’ was in my elementary school library. I never did read it, but I didn’t understand the meaning of the word ‘down’ in this context. You just don’t see too many uses of it in the US; plus, I think I may have been 9 or 10 years old. My thoughts upon seeing the book’s cover were something like “OK, this book has to be about a ship that sinks, or a submarine. Why are there pictures of bunnies on the cover? “😄

NicolaLuna
NicolaLuna
3 years ago

The weird thing is that I’ve come across books on sex from forty years *before that one* which aren’t that bad.

Hopefully books nowadays are better. Even books from the early 90s weren’t great, I recently found one that I had as a kid and on the bit about childbirth it says “the doctor makes a cut so the baby can come out.” Not as if it’s an option if things aren’t going well but like it always happens.

@EJ (The Other One)
Thanks ^_^ good to be back. Took a break for 3 months as uni work was getting on top of me. I’m back on track now.

Weird (and tired of trumplings) Eddie
Weird (and tired of trumplings) Eddie
3 years ago

re: The Joy of Sects…

The late 60’s-early 70’s were about sex, drugs and rock’n’roll… from a culture which knew oh, so little about any of them

The rock’n’roll was ok, though in hindsight it had a really misogynistic foundation. The anti-war songs were great, tho….

Magnificent Octopus
Magnificent Octopus
3 years ago

long time lurker, first (I think) time commenter. I read a ton of the Xanth novels in middle school, and they definitely warped the way I looked at gender and sexuality for years afterwards. Luckily, at some point I transitioned to Discworld, which was much healthier.

Also, just thinking of books that have a large influence on your life: In high school I found a copy of Albert Camus’ book Resistance, Rebellion and Death. I liked the title, so I read it. For about 2 weeks, I listened to nothing in class because I was reading this under my desk. It was my first real exposure to philosophy, and it wasn’t until years later I realised how much it shaped my world view. All things considered, there are worse books I could have chosen for my first philosophical foray.

Weird (and tired of trumplings) Eddie
Weird (and tired of trumplings) Eddie
3 years ago

So if you find yourself having a threesome you’ll get eaten alive by carnivorous slugs in the act and so on

That’s Rule Number Three: “anyone who has sex will die”, behind “anyone who leaves the group will die” and “anyone who says “we’re almost there (or any form thereof) will die”….

varalys the dark
3 years ago

Yes, it’s a trope in horror the 80’s really codified, the have sex and you’ll die. I could never understand how you could miss a carpet of slugs creeping up on you no matter how hot the sex was. They weren’t superfast slugs, just ones with a taste for human flesh. God it was a crap book, and it had a sequel.

Fruitloopsie
Fruitloopsie
3 years ago

weirwoodtreehugger: chief manatee
Oh boy a dude made a false accusation against someone I guess this means we should never ever trust a man ever again whenever they make an accusation because they are all liars and just want to ruin the poor women’s careers and want fame. /s Manosphere logic.

Seriously that is terrible of what he did. It’s defiantly not something you should joke about.

Lumipuna (nee Arctic Ape)
Lumipuna (nee Arctic Ape)
3 years ago

@ Lumipuna:

River Out Of Eden?

Sounds vaguely familiar – the Finnish translated title was something different.

Some 10 years ago I went to see Dawkins live when I was an undergrad and he gave a guest lecture at the University of Helsinki. He really drew the giant auditorium full, like the big celebrity he was then. I doubt many cared what exactly he was going to speak about. I only remember he had a charming accent.

Moon_custafer
Moon_custafer
3 years ago

@Weird

Then there’s my favourite – anybody who looks at someone just off-camera and says “Oh, it’s you” will die.

SF
SF
3 years ago

“The Road” gave me nightmares and I still periodically get unwanted imagery in annoying situations, such as walking the dog at night. I wish Cormac McCarthy had been polite enough to make the book an unintelligible mass of scripta continua like his other works.

peaches
peaches
3 years ago

I got a book called Paperbacks From Hell by Grady Hendrix, which is a history of the sleazy horror paperbacks of the 70’s and 80’s. I recommend it highly-we can’t even pretend the 80’s were ever dignified.

weirwoodtreehugger: chief manatee

Any side character who has an important piece of information to give the main character but doesn’t want to do it over the phone will die.

Any cop who is near retirement will die.

Anyone who says “I’ll be right back” will die.

Anyone who is super skeptical about the supernatural goings on will die.

If there is only one black character (or two if it’s a couple) the black character will die early on.

Anyone who is fat or otherwise not conventionally attractive will die but anyone who is too conventionally hot will also die. Especially if they get naked.

Anyone who takes a shower will die. If you suspect you’ve entered a horror movie situation, just let yourself get stanky. If you shower, you die. You might survive if you take a bath instead, but only if you’re the final girl and it’s guaranteed that something scary will happen when you’re in the tub.

http://38.media.tumblr.com/c20aad242f8b721d1af00e1fd84c30a9/tumblr_nh8ms3KjRL1rp0vkjo1_500.gif

Seriously. Not worth it. Stay dirty.

Redsilkphoenix: Jetpack Vixen, FemiNest Collective agent, Hell Toupee keeper & Intergalactic Meanie
Redsilkphoenix: Jetpack Vixen, FemiNest Collective agent, Hell Toupee keeper & Intergalactic Meanie
3 years ago

@Varalys,

Either that book – or one with a similar premise – was said to have inspired at least three people to become published writers themselves. Because if something that bad could get published, then so could their stuff.

peaches
peaches
3 years ago

Yep, even in Diary of the Dead the shower trope showed up.

Gaebolga
Gaebolga
3 years ago

@Alan Robertshaw

Yeah, Watership Down is pretty grim, right off the bat. But if you’re looking for cool critters, have you read the Duncton Wood series?

Fruitloopsie
Fruitloopsie
3 years ago

I do recommend books like Warrior series by Erin Hunter which is about cats.
Murder she wrote, Sherlock Holmes and Alice in wonderland are what I like.

I read Animal farm, of mice and men and witch trials in high school.

As a Christian i don’t see how the narnia series are related to Jesus? But I guess I have to do more research and watch them.

Totally not bad books at all but I bought two books one of them legend of Zelda historia I love legend of Zelda. And the other is national geographic Indian nations of North America, haven’t been reading it though only a few pages. Hopefully I get a book about the Romani people and the Katitzi books written by a Romani. Though I don’t think I’ll be able to read them since theyre in Swedish.
It’s difficult for me to read so I read visual novels and manga. Nothing violent, etc though.

And about 50 shades of grey
http://misandry-mermaid.tumblr.com/image/112349361613
Somehow this is suitable for children but breastfeeding or a gay or trans person are not?

Dormousing_it
Dormousing_it
3 years ago

RE: Children’s critter books. ‘Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH’ was one of my favorite books as a child. I think there’s enough going on in it, for adults to find it interesting. I still have it on my bookshelf.

Sam
Sam
3 years ago

I don’t even remember what the title of the book was, but when I was 11 or so I was a voracious reader and proudly bought a massive, “mature” fantasy novel because I was at a very high reading level and was ready for adult books now.

Within two chapters, the heroine of the novel was graphically raped by the dude who would later become the Love Interest. It gave me some very odd notions about consent and virginity and the mechanics of sex for several years. (To be fair, my hangups regarding virginity were in no way entirely this book’s fault.)

That sounds similar to the “Thomas Covenant” series, where some terminally ill guy keeps shifting into a fantasy world till he finally stays there. I read that in early high school on recommendation from a friend who thought I’d dig it if I liked Game of Thrones. I got a few pages past that rape and put it down and never read another word or work from that guy. Hated it

Fruitloopsie
Fruitloopsie
3 years ago

Oh my gosh I love the secret of nimh by don bluth. but don’t ever watch the sequel it’s bad. Actually don’t watch any of the sequels.
All dogs go to heaven is good too. it’s very tragic of what happen to the little girl who voiced Anne Marie.

Fluffy Spider
Fluffy Spider
3 years ago

@fruitloopsie
I love the Warriors Saga!
It inspired me to try and write my own critter based series. I haven’t really gotten it off the ground yet (mine will be slightly more magic based)
I read this kids book called Swordbird once in terms of books. It was pretty good also the Lionboy series (main character is mixed race ) There’s also a lion king-esque one by Erin Hunter which seems interesting.
Ugh the Secret of Nimh 2 or Let’s forget Mrs Brisby existed because Timmy existes….hate it hate it hate it.

NicolaLuna
NicolaLuna
3 years ago

Ooohhh the talk of critter books just reminded me of a book I loved as a kid – Redwall

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Redwall_(novel)

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

Thanks for the terrifying animal book recommends!

As this is now a general book thread I feel able to mention fluffy pink romantic novelist Barbara Cartland. She famously churned out books by dictating to three secretaries that followed her everywhere.

What is less well known is she designed the gliders used on D-Day. She won a medal for that. She was a pioneer of aviation and was one of the team that experimented with the first practical use of towed gliders.
comment image

(That’s her in her own glider)

Fruitloopsie
Fruitloopsie
3 years ago

Fluffy Spider
That sounds interesting I want to read them already. ♥️
Mrs Brisby risks her life countless of times to rescue her family and others and gets absolutely nothing but her son gets a parade and a statue for doing literally nothing. 😡

BritterSweet
3 years ago

I wouldn’t call it ruining my life so much as not realizing how screwed up it really is until you’re older and more empathetic, but in elementary school I saw the movie for “The Indian in the Cupboard,” and then read the book series. I was interested in it because what kid doesn’t enjoy a story about toys coming to life and actually interacting with the kid? It’s also where I first heard of the Iroquois, earlier than my actual history classes.

(Cw: Spoilers and casual cruelty)

The first book implies and the later books flat out reveal that Little Bear, Boone and every other plastic person Omri brings to life with the cupboard is actually a real person brought over to the present day in a form of involuntary time travel. There is even a part where Omri and his father travel to Little Bear’s time by inhabiting dolls that Little Bear’s wife made. Suddenly that changed how I felt about Omri keeping Little Bear captive in his room when he could have sent him back any time and despite Little Bear asking to go home!

Also in the movie, Omri kicks a hamster ball with his brother’s pet rat inside so hard it goes flying out of his room and down the stairs. And in both the book and movie, Omri and his friend Patrick have Little Bear and Boone watch an old west movie with settlers gunning down screaming natives. Boone actually cheers it on and fires his pistol in the air, leading a panicked Little Bear to shoot him with an arrow.

It didn’t make me lack empathy any more than I already did in order to not notice how cruel the characters were. Still, though, yikes.

Weird (and tired of trumplings) Eddie
Weird (and tired of trumplings) Eddie
3 years ago

movie spoiler…

If there is only one black character (or two if it’s a couple) the black character will die early on.

… yeah… but still, Samuel L. Jackson’s death in Deep Blue Sea hadda be the most AWESOME WTF!?!?!? moment!!

Axecalibur: Middle Name Danger
Axecalibur: Middle Name Danger
3 years ago

@NicolaLuna
Reread a few of the Redwall books recently. Loved em as a kid. They… only sorta hold up. Some better than others (Redwall and Mossflower are decent, Martin the Warrior are really good if flawed, Mattimeo is exactly a tired sequel nobody asked for, and I have completely forgotten Legend of Luke). And not even mentioning the racism. Still, glad I read em again. Was fun revisiting what 10yo me was into. Speaking of, really need to run thru the Cpt Underpants books again (not even kidding, Pilkey has a new book out, and I’m irrationally hype 😀)

Chris Oakley
Chris Oakley
3 years ago

@Uly: Holy F***! Piers Anthony a pedophile?!! Why did I not know this before? I was seriously thinking about checking out one of his books later this week.

ETA: I found further info on the subject at The AV Club and suffice it to say I am NOT going to read of Anthony’s books. Ever. At all.

weirwoodtreehugger: chief manatee

Fruitloopsie,

Here’s a quick primer on the Christian symbolism in the Chronicles of Narnia
http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/0/24865379

I’d have to agree with everyone else that it’s a far more effective kid’s fantasy adventure series than it is a gateway to Christianity though. Kids tend to be literal minded and not see symbolism in literature, even if it’s heavy handed. I was an advanced reader for my age growing up and I didn’t get it until maybe junior high age or so. Plus there are so many resurrection stories in religion, mythology, folk tales and fantasy that Aslan’s doesn’t seem particularly noteworthy.

Lucrece
Lucrece
3 years ago

@Fruitloopsie

As a Christian i don’t see how the narnia series are related to Jesus? But I guess I have to do more research and watch them.

Oh boy! You have some great reading in your future, if you’re into literary analysis (which I am). But just to start your thoughts down the track, [*spoiler alert* for anyone who hasn’t read The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe] lets look at the biggie – Aslan the lion is quite literally Christ. He is betrayed by the actions of one of his followers and he willingly sacrifices himself to atone for that man’s sin and thereby save the world. He is humiliated (his mane is cut off) and taunted by his captors in the lead-up to his death. His body is tended to by the women after his death, but mysteriously then disappears and the stone table he was lying on cracks in half. We later find out that his body hadn’t disappeared, he had actually come back to life to join the final battle of Good and Evil.

If we look at other characters, the White Witch is pretty obviously Satan, tempting Edmund with sweetmeats and wanting to rule the world.

There are other elements, but it’s been over twenty years since I read it, so hopefully that’s given you enough to go on with. If you do try an analysis, just remember that no bow is too long to draw, since Lewis himself was quite explicit about the Christian allegory aspect of this series. As I believe was mentioned upthread, he deliberately wrote the Passion, or elements of it, into all books in the series (I must confess to only having read three of them, however, so I can’t do much more analysis).

ETA: scooped by WWTH! Ah well, hopefully what I’ve written isn’t too far out from the BBC’s version.

Fluffy Spider
Fluffy Spider
3 years ago

@fruitloopsie
I know right? To this day I consider it fan fiction I won’t recognize it a canon. I usually will give sequels a chance but most are what I expected or like this enough to make me want to throw copies out my window.
Another interesting three animal books Firebringer, The Sight and Fell.

Z&T
Z&T
3 years ago

@ David, yes give that K. Douglas one a try. I’d say “you won’t regret it” 😀 but you probably will.

@ Bananananana dakry,

That’s rather sad, it sounds like a pretty crappy book. The title sounds vaguely familiar too, probably something I skipped over at the library and should be glad I did.

Uly
Uly
3 years ago

That’s why I stopped reading L.A. Myers. As the series went on, his main character (Jackie) turned into a obnoxious Mary Sue. She was instantly talented at everything she tried, from music to swordplay to dancing, and of course every red-blooded male she encountered fell in love with her. At any one time, she usually had 2 or 3 competing suitors. The plots got to be tiresome and predictable.

Also, every book she has one near-rape. EVERY. DAMN. BOOK. There’s not a villain in the series who doesn’t want to rape her, nor a random bystander who isn’t eager to stop it. (Well, sometimes they have heart attacks and die instead, but either way, it’s entirely gratuitous.)

As far as Piers Anthony goes, in his defense – and this is some pretty pathetic defense, I’ll admit – there’s no allegations that he’s ever acted on his obvious inclinations. But boy howdy, he’s sure active in making sure we know that those are the natural and normal inclinations for human males and only civilization holds them back!

griffon8
griffon8
3 years ago

Closest I’ve had was that for years when asked what my favorite science fiction book was I’d say The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress by Robert Heinlein.

I was much more aware of the stupidity of libertarianism when I finally reread it. Now I won’t say what my favorite science fiction book is until I read it again.

Donnie
Donnie
3 years ago

I can’t think of a book that I could blame for ruining my life . . . I have some books I wish I’d read more skeptically, but I’m talking about books I agreed with for the most part, that advanced me along a path I was already following:

Unintended Consequences by John Ross. The first half of the book is a wordy history of “the gun culture” in America, from the point of view of a gun nut far beyond my own powers of gun-nuttery. The second half is a bloated novel about Ross’s Mary Sue character, a pilot/skydiver/day trader/hot driver/militaria collector/world-class expert with shotgun, rifle, pistol, machine guns and anti-tank rifle/avid safari hunter/hard-bitten survivor of the anti-gun, anti-American dystopian hell that was rural Missouri circa 1995 (you probably remember.) Jo–I mean Henry Bowman is staying at a friend’s compound when he murders a group of high-zoot international gun thieves, only to discover that they’re really BATF agents planting evidence, so he and his friends launch a nationwide campaign of assassination of government officials.

I’ve been thinking lately about blogging or podcasting the experience of re-reading the book as a 40-year-old who regrets the part I played in the gun-rights movement, kind of like Libby Anne did with the Pearls’ parenting and marriage books over at Love, Joy, Feminism.

It’s one of those books that made a HUGE impact in “The Gun Culture” in the 1990s, but outside that bubble I don’t think most people know it exists.

Hippodameia
Hippodameia
3 years ago

I’d have to agree with everyone else that it’s a far more effective kid’s fantasy adventure series than it is a gateway to Christianity though. Kids tend to be literal minded and not see symbolism in literature, even if it’s heavy handed.

Yeah – as a non-christian twelve-year-old, I didn’t pick up on the “obvious” stuff because it wasn’t actually obvious to me until he rubbed my face in it in the last paragraph of the last page of the last book. I didn’t appreciate Lewis stringing me along because he wanted to make me more receptive to his proselytizing, which is essentially what he admits to in the end.

Unfortunately, in many cases the actual reaction was “Nooooo!!! Narnia was my escape from the Christianity that’s being shoved down my throat! And now I find out it was shoving Christianity down my throat the whole time! Everything is ruined! I hate these books!” Oops.

Yep.

(edited because it ate the second quote)

Lunetta
Lunetta
3 years ago

There was a chapter about homosexuality. In which the author stated that gay men who have anal sex eventually lose all muscle control in their rectum and cannot hold their feces in, or even walk normally, without holding their legs together without shit pouring out.

It’s unbelievable that something like that could have been published!

My dad actually told me the same myth when I was about 12 but told me that gay men have to put butt plugs in to stop the poop coming out. It wasn’t until I was like 15 that I realised that butt plugs aren’t used for that.

@NicolaLuna I was gobsmacked when just 10 years ago – on an email group (I think a yahoogroups list) that was set up for teens, and others to ask questions about sexuality and get open and honest answers – a man replied to a question about how to perform anal sex with the same rubbish! When challenged on it by myself and others he doubled down and insisted it was true and he knew it because he said he was an emergency ward nurse and had seen the results of anal sex with his own eyes. When again challenged, he then admitted he was talking about small children who had been sexually assaulted. He still wouldn’t back down on his original assertion though. I left the group at that point.

Dvärghundspossen
Dvärghundspossen
3 years ago

Re Thomas Covenant and the author Stephen Donaldson… So I started reading the books as a young teen and stopped, horrified, after the rape scene. Way later Husband said I might wanna give them another go, because the rape just doesn’t disappear from the story, it’s actually dealt with. (This was still many years ago, but I was an adult). So I read the books again, kept reading after the rape. And the raped girl pops back into the plot at some point. She got pregnant from the rape and now has this daughter as a result. She’s convinced herself that she and Thomas are in this great relationship and that they’re soulmates and stuff. It’s clear that she was super-traumatized by the rape and this is just her way of psychologically desperately trying to deal with things. And at least back then when I read it, I thought the story actually handled it okay in the end.
Also, I really liked the fantasy world Donaldson created there, it felt fresh and original.
Eventually I gave up on the series because the prose kept getting more and more purple and the descriptions of scenery became more and more elaborate until I felt the books had become unreadable. Although I regretted that it had, because at that point the story had shifted so that Thomas’ girlfriend Linsey (at least I think that was her name) was the main character. I think she was interesting in part because she was a psychiatrist and head of an asylum, but seriously dedicated to helping mentally ill people. How often do you see that in pop culture? A woman in charge at an asylum tends to be painted evil.

BUUUUUT then I read Donaldson’s first book in his sci-fi “gap” series, which contains really graphic descriptions of rape and abuse of a woman, done by the series’ super evil villain, but I felt that Donaldson really wallowed in the abuse, and that disgusted me. No fucking way I’ll give that series a second chance.

Also read the first book in his fantasy series about a land where everyone does magic with mirrors. Don’t remember the name now, but anyway… I put that one down because it was clichéd and silly. The main character is this super hot chick who’s still completely unaware that she’s super hot, you know the type. She travels to this fantasyland and meets this clumsy awkward nice guy and it’s obvious from the start that they’re gonna end up together eventually. She also meets this sexy wizard whom she’s attracted to and it’s equally obvious that it’s gonna be revealed that he’s evil. Because everything is so cliché and the reader immediately grasps these things, the main character comes off as a moron for not seeing any of it.

So yeah, that’s all of my experiences with author Stephen Donaldson.

Catalpa
Catalpa
3 years ago

Speaking of not having any idea of how anal sex works, I have a vague memory of being quite young and overhearing my dad (or possibly one of his friends) tell a joke that went along the lines of “two gay men went to take a bath together; one left to grab towels and came back to find the bathroom walls covered in white stuff. The other man looks embarrassed and said that he had just farted.”

I was too young to know about anal sex or semen, so I assumed that this meant that gay people naturally secrete white stuff from their nether regions. Sometime after this, I started puberty and started producing vaginal discharge, which I was quite concerned was in fact my body’s way of saying “congratulations! You’re gay!”. (I turned out to be ace, actually, but I’m pretty sure that nothing my body produces is a signal of that orientation XD)

Dvärghundspossen
Dvärghundspossen
3 years ago

@Catalpa: Is it okay if I laugh at this? I mean I’m sorry you got such bad sex ed, but it is a bit funny…

Catalpa
Catalpa
3 years ago

Haha, it’s fine, I thought it was a funny story. I did later have a fairly comprehensive sex education, but I was too young to have really had much of that at the time. I was like, 10. They certainly hadn’t talked about gay people, or sex in general, it was more “your bodies are different in these ways, this is what you can expect when you get older”. I believe that my class had covered periods, but they never really talked about any other stuff the vagina produces.

And I had to wait until I was 20+ to learn about my zombiefying vagina goo!

NicolaLuna
NicolaLuna
3 years ago

Reread a few of the Redwall books recently. Loved em as a kid. They… only sorta hold up. Some better than others (Redwall and Mossflower are decent, Martin the Warrior are really good if flawed, Mattimeo is exactly a tired sequel nobody asked for, and I have completely forgotten Legend of Luke). And not even mentioning the racism.

Racism? Oh no. I didn’t pick up on it as a kid but it would be interesting to re-read.

When again challenged, he then admitted he was talking about small children who had been sexually assaulted. He still wouldn’t back down on his original assertion though. I left the group at that point.

I don’t blame you for leaving. There’s such a big difference between consensual anal sex and rape. The fact that people equate the 2 is ridiculous.

Fruitloopsie
Fruitloopsie
3 years ago

Thanks for replying. I remember watching a cartoon version of Narnia and the live action but it was when I was younger so I barely remember it.

Oh man all the bad sex ed people here got. Lol. Except the part of comparing rape to consensual anal sex not ‘lol’ at all.

I hear in Texas sex ed is really bad. Saying clits and female orgasms don’t exist and have to cover their vaginas so if they’re taking baths the water won’t go inside them.

One time a lady was talking about uteruses and this grown man asked what’s a uterus?

All these Doctor stories I heard are unreal like a lady didn’t know sex leads to pregnancy, a woman said she’s lesbian so she can’t get pregnant, etc.

I wish I was joking.

This is why sex Ed is extremely important.

Hexum7
Hexum7
3 years ago

Another tip from Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Sex:

In a pinch, a coca-cola douche can be used for birth control and plastic cling wrap can be used in place of a condom. One can only imagine how many ships of unwanted pregnancies that idiotic advice launched

Another book that kind of traumatized me as a teen- though, in a good way, if that makes any sense, was Rosemary’s Baby

Having been sent to Catholic Schools as a kid- not because my parents were deeply Catholic but because they were racist- I was extremely curious about books that had been banned by the church.

So, I read, Rosemary with, dare I say it, fiendish glee. Though eventually I was a bit disappointed; it turned out to be quite a bit tamer and less lurid than I expected, it did mark the first time when I really started questioning Catholicism. Because in putting all that hoo doo in a modern sentence, I thought, ‘Crap, these people ( priests and nuns) actually believe stuff like this can happen…this is looney. So that began me on my journey to rejecting all of that toxic tripe and dealing with the real world in a more frequent basis

Jamie
Jamie
3 years ago

Like some other commenters, I read the Xanth novels at a very young age and they had some fucked up sex stuff in them. I distinctly remember that in one book the main character (a woman) had been gang raped, but the gang rape was described in ways that made it seem kind of sexy. Also, it made her “sexy damaged” and her boyfriend had to save her from her past. It created a lot of weird ideas about sex and rape that it took me years to get over.

Also, not a book but my mom used to let me watch Melrose Place with her when I was in elementary school. I believed for years that adults were having sex all the time with different people. Like adulthood was basically about just having constant sex with new partners.

Hambeast
Hambeast
3 years ago

I can’t say that I was ruined by a book. I’ve never been very good at critical thinking and believed everything in (nonfiction) books was true until I reached an embarrassingly advanced age. That’s why I spend so much time reading here and at other blogs; I learn so much about stuff like that.

I also read a bunch of VC Andrews, starting in Jr. High. I knew they were trashy as hell and was always ashamed of myself for reading them. I graduated to Stephen King in High School.

Closest thing I can contribute is that I’ve never looked at advertising the same way after reading Subliminal Seduction by Wilson Bryan Key. O_o

Katamount – Had to read Great Expectations in Jr. High and hated it so much, I never read any more “classics” until very recently! I read Wuthering Heights after seeing the movie on TCM because it was free on Kindle.

CNS
CNS
3 years ago

I love books. But… Conquest by Andrea Smith may ruined me for a while.

I used to work with victims of domestic violence and sexual assault in an area next to a large reservation so I worked with a lot of native american women. I became really interested in and considered myself really informed on native american culture. I read Conquest, a fascinating book about the intersection of sexism and colonialism with regards to native american women and it really resonated with me. I even recommended it to people.

…Then it came out the Andrea Smith was not actually Cherokee as she claimed to be; she was repeatedly asked by native american scholars to stop false identifying as such.

Now I’m squeamish talking about native american culture at all from an academic standpoint with any sort of authority (I am white), especially considering the history of white people claiming native american blood to establish their association with Pocahontas and the creation of the Pocahontas exception in the racial integrity act of 1924.

The whole thing left me with a bad taste in my mouth.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ CNS

Firstly, glad to see your modified nym.

Secondly, you may find this interesting

https://youtu.be/dmP3gGj9yjM

It’s a rather excellent documentary about how indigenous culture has been viewed, and to an extent fabricated, by white folks.