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Thanks!! And also sorry!

Owwwww my head

By David Futrelle

A quick little update post.

First off, GIANT THANKS to everyone who’s donated during this fund drive! I can’t do this blog without you, and I appreciate everything you all do to help, whether your donations are large or small or if you contribute to the blog in some other way.

If you can’t donated yet, please do! Pledges are running behind what I need to cover costs, and every little (or big) bit helps!

I’m going to extend the pledge drive for at least a few more days, and will have another update soon. THANKS!

Second, sorry that posts have been light over the past couple of days!

As some of you know, I have problems with chronic migraines that can interfere rather severely with my productivity. Right now I’m in a difficult spot, trying (on the advice of a neurologist) to break a vicious cycle of rebound headaches by more or less going cold turkey on my regular migraine meds and all other painkillers, which means I basically have to deal with my headaches raw for now in hopes of fewer headaches in the future. Hopefully this process won’t take more than  a few more days, but until it’s over posts will be light.

I’ve also fallen behind on emails, but please keep on sending tips!

Thanks for understanding. Thanks for everything!

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Dormousing_it
Dormousing_it
3 years ago

The writer William S. Burroughs said, or wrote, something to the effect of, “Human beings have the experience of immortality, through their pet cats.” Since we are practically immortal, compared to them.

I know Burroughs is a very problematic writer, from a woman’s standpoint, but I’ve always liked his works – well, since I was a teenager, anyway.

Boogerghost
Boogerghost
3 years ago

Big hugs if you want ’em, David!! Which I at first mistyped as “Favid,” because you are among my favourite Davids.

Croquembouche, poorly-dressed vandal
Croquembouche, poorly-dressed vandal
3 years ago

Diego and kupo, I’m so sorry for your losses. Of course we know (or expect, or hope) that we will outlive our companion beasties. It would be even harsher to take them into our lives knowing we might go first, and leave them helpless behind us.

Scildfreya, double sympathies because this is right now for you.
I know playing internet vet is on a par with playing internet doctor, but: your diabetic kitteh with the skin condition – is the usual skin treatment out because it is steroidal? Has your vet considered NSAIDs such as Meloxicam or Piroxicam which are becoming more frequently frequently used in animals?

About 5 years ago I could find very little on the internet about their use in cats, but since then, much more info has been put up.

These NSAIDs don’t interact so badly with insulin, and piroxicam can be given as a topical gel, which means less of it enters the bloodstream to mess with the overall metabolism of the human or beastie.

Just a thought, because 5 years ago none of the vets I took my cat to had heard of it before, so yours may not have either.

*Nerdish detail: the effectiveness of piroxicam in treating canine bladder cancer appears to have been discovered because some of the test dogs used for skin safety-testing the drug for human use had CBC and got better in piroxicam trials – so, occasionally human experimentation on animals benefits other animals in the long term.

Shartheheretic
Shartheheretic
3 years ago

Sending solidarity in healing migraine vibes to you, David. Hope you get relief soon.

I’ve had my latest migraine for 5 days now. Yesterday, I apparently decided to have a new symptom: dizziness (which is a common aura for me) followed by an inability to swallow (not common). Lasted about 30 seconds, then the pain got worse. I’m guessing I’m either having hemiplegic migraine (which has happened in the past), or my brain is starting to have the little “mini-strokes” that are common when you get to my age with the type of migraines I primarily have. Either way, not cool.

I can’t even with the whole dog brains for women thing.

Jesalin
Jesalin
3 years ago

@Scildfreja

<3 Jesalin, my favourite Nova Scotian (don't tell my sister in law).

~^.^~

Re: Cornwallis

As for Cornwallis, my personal preference is for those statues to be hauled off to museums where their ignorance and evil can be put on display alongside whatever good they might have done. Put them under glass where they are no longer a daily sight to inspire the bigots and retrograde elements of society, while not putting them down the memory hole. Frankly, though, I’d really rather the First Nation people most affected by Cornwallis’s hideous war decide what happens to it. That seems only fair to me.

You said it better than I could!

@Gussie

As a Nova Scotian, heard any local scuttlebutt on the Cornwallis topic?

Only what’s in the news, I don’t really socialize much.

dslucia
dslucia
3 years ago

Nova Scotia?

Hey, that’s where I live at the moment!

Neat.

Not related to anything: Have people here seen American History X? I’m just watching it for the first time, and it’s really striking me just how relevant the writing of it still is today, what with the surge of white nationalism and everything that’s been going on in the past year or two.

BS and his four fluffy kitties
BS and his four fluffy kitties
3 years ago

David, I hope you feel better.

Please enjoy this video of my new fluffy kittehs playing. The brown cat is the black and white kitten’s mom, which makes this funnier and more wrong:

Bonk! #kittens #cats #catsofinstagram #kittensofinstagram #victoriaandprudence A post shared by Brian (@bps1976) on Jul 20, 2017 at 4:54pm PDT

Policy of Madness
Policy of Madness
3 years ago

But I struggle to wrap my head around ideas like “gender is just a construct”.

You need to understand that we describe a whole ball of thread with just the one word, “gender.” Gender means gender presentation, gender identity, and the experience that someone has of being gendered by others, just to name a few important threads in the ball.

Gender identity seems to be hardwired in some way, otherwise trans people would not exist. But “gender” is a social construct in the sense that the experience that a feminine-presenting person has in the world is different from the experience that a masculine-presenting person has, and these experiences are entirely shaped by social forces. I hope that makes sense? I can say that I do not identify with any gender (innate), but my gender presentation means that I am treated as female by the world, and that gives me a certain experience that male-presenting people don’t have (socially constructed).

Now, I see the argument sometimes that gender is entirely socially constructed, even gender identity, and that used to be the story that we were told. That’s what I was taught in college, for instance. But the existence of transgender people puts the lie in that, so I don’t think it’s a valid way of looking at the world anymore. It’s more helpful to think of “gender” as encompassing many things, including the social experience of gender, which is definitely a construct, and including gender identity, which is almost certainly innate in some way.

Anyway, I’m asking to cut down a BS tactic which makes women/feminists/eggheads look like fools by saying that they believe that there are no hardwired differences between the sexes.

If there was no difference, there would be no trans people. However, “differences between the sexes” is typically used to mean that women aren’t any good at math or science, because difference between the sexes, which has been demonstrated to be bullshit. So you are correct in identifying this as a bad-faith argument. When someone invokes “differences between the sexes” and mentions brains, it means “women’s brains are inferior” 100% of the time, so even though gender identity is probably related to brain function in some way, it’s not going to be easy to avoid the “women can’t STEM” nonsense. Good luck with that.

I hope that made a modicum of sense because I’m operating on very little sleep right now and plan to hop into bed in about 10 min.

Sylvia Daniella Foxglove
Sylvia Daniella Foxglove
3 years ago

Sex is also a social construct. Especially the MF difference. We put all sorts of expectations into what someone of any sex is. That woman will have children and men are only there for sperm giving( I’ve heard this on both sides). But as science has shown that the binary isn’t exactly real, with all of the ways one can be intersexed. Our ideas of what sex is change constantly. And very few of us know what our sex chromosones are(which at most make up 2% of our genes). Then our bodies go through development multiple times, from before birth to puberty. Or second puberty. Many things typically thought of as being part of sex turns out to be because of hormones. Which can be added to the body anytime. Gender is a social construct because every bit of it is something cultural, it’s what people expect of you, and what you expect of yourself. But if we were to map that over time and culture, you’ll see there is no true gender. What is expected of woman in America is different from what Japan expects.. Now go through history. Its very complicated. For me it means I’m not transgender but I am transexual, I’m quite settled with my gender nonconformance, but I am not happy with my biology, and wish to match more with woman, hence hormones. Not everyone agrees with me. But to put it shortly, the world is more chaotic and messy than most people want to admit. None of us are objective all the time, or use logic all the time. Also, Freedom of Choice, Biology is not Destiny, we aren’t just Gene machines but also meme machines. We’re more than Nature, and can go.beyond nurture.

kupo
kupo
3 years ago

Can you give me a solid example that it’s not a feminist position that hardwired differences between the sexes don’t exist?

If someone is telling you that this is a feminist position, it’s on them to provide evidence of that. You can’t prove a negative.

EJ (the Scheming Liberal Race-Traitor)

@dslucia:
I really liked American History X, which means I want to discuss it critically.

A few years ago I read a critique of it which said that it helped to spread the unhelpful “racism is a thing done by clearly-evil skinheads with swastika tattoos, and if you’re not one of them you can’t be a racist” narrative we’ve all encountered. At the time, this critique hit home for me. Since then, however, the world appears to have discovered that many of the less-overt racists were just waiting for the right moment to revert back to being skinheads with swastika tattoos, which has complicated the matter somewhat.

There’s also class issues in it, which are interesting in their own right but I don’t know enough to speak about.

Scented Fucking Hard Chairs
Scented Fucking Hard Chairs
3 years ago

In unrelatedly hilarious news, my poor PS4 just tried to autofill “For” as “Fucksplattering.” What the hell have I been teaching it?!

Weird (thumper of trumpanzees) Eddie
Weird (thumper of trumpanzees) Eddie
3 years ago

@ SFHC;

I was texting a friend and my fone autocorrected a misspelled “Oklahoma” to read “pornography”…. That was… awkward

abars01
abars01
3 years ago

Just saw Cars 3 and Spider-Man: Homecoming, but now I’ve read an alt-right rant about that upcoming HBO show where the South wins the Civil War, so now I’ve got that plus Star Trek: Discovery plus Doctor Who on my plate. When Black Panther comes out, they’re going to rant about that too, aren’t they? Jesus Christ, keeping up with all the movies and TV shows these people take issue with is becoming exhausting…

Policy of Madness
Policy of Madness
3 years ago

If someone is telling you that this is a feminist position, it’s on them to provide evidence of that. You can’t prove a negative.

It would be pretty easy to demonstrate that some feminists say that. It was in my undergraduate gender studies textbook, after all.

One can’t prove a negative, but one can show evidence that the opposite is true. If the two are mutually exclusive, then the same evidence is evidence of the negative.

dslucia
dslucia
3 years ago

@EJ:

It was a super tough movie to watch that comes with all the content warnings, and I think it could’ve actually benefited from being longer so that it could spend a little more time showing more of Derek’s general slide into white supremacy and/or his transition away from it again, but I thought it handled the general idea of how young white men are radicalized incredibly well. The thing that particularly surprised me was just how similar a lot of the rhetoric in the movie was to the things we see being said online today; a lot of Derek’s racist rants sounded almost word-for-word exactly like the stuff that comes out of the manosphere. And it never fell back on trying to imply any of them were mentally unstable or anything, which I think is something that could’ve been a very easy out.

I’m not sure about the ending, though. Kinda felt like that was just there for dramatic purposes.

Troubelle: Moonbeam Malcontent + Bard of the New Movement
Troubelle: Moonbeam Malcontent + Bard of the New Movement
3 years ago

@SFHC, Weird Eddie

Reminds me when I went on a tired rant to my phone on speech to text the other night. Apparently I informed them not to snort memes up their cock. (They don’t have a cock.)

Jesalin
Jesalin
3 years ago

Now, I see the argument sometimes that gender is entirely socially constructed, even gender identity, and that used to be the story that we were told. That’s what I was taught in college, for instance. But the existence of transgender people puts the lie in that

Just wanted to add:

Not only that but there have been cases where someone has been born with both sets of genitalia (ie. intersexed) and the doctor, with or without any parental input, takes it upon his or herself to decide that the child is male or female (interestingly though they always seem to skew male..strange).

If gender were entirely socially constructed this wouldn’t really matter (robbing the child of their choice is another matter though) and they’d live a normal(ish) life. However, since gender identity is hard-wired, it does matter. If the doctor chooses wrong, that child is either going to have a miserable life, or they are going to have a short miserable life before suiciding.

And then there is the case of David Reimer (Coincidentally he had the same birrthday as me, except for the year).

I’m going to copy/paste here, otherwise it’ll probably take me forever to get to the main point(s). I tend to take the ‘verbal’ long route I know, I’m sorry.

Psychologist John Money oversaw the case and reported the reassignment as successful and as evidence that gender identity is primarily learned. Academic sexologist Milton Diamond later reported that Reimer failed to identify as female since the age of 9 to 11,and transitioned to living as a male at age 15. Well known in medical circles for years anonymously as the “John/Joan” case, Reimer later went public with his story to help discourage similar medical practices. He later committed suicide after suffering years of severe depression, financial instability, and a troubled marriage.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Reimer

https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2013/5/17/1209792/-Sex-change-surgery-performed-on-16-month-old-South-Carolina-child-without-consent

Until recently, medical wisdom was that boys born without a penis should be raised female because in many ways it’s easier. But if research once suggested this was the right thing to do, my case surely proves that it’s not. Gender is far more than a matter of clothes or conditioning. I was raised a girl in every way, but I was absolutely a boy.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-3191600/The-agony-learning-ve-raised-wrong-sex-rare-condition-meant-doctors-weren-t-sure-sex-Joe-born-support-Princess-Diana-finally-accepted-girl-came-shattering-discovery.html

Dormousing_it
Dormousing_it
3 years ago

@Jesalin

RE: David Reimer – I’ve read about his case before. Poor guy. And, what an arrogant shrink.

Virgin Mary
Virgin Mary
3 years ago

I do not know if I have an intersex condition, but it would explain a lot if I did. I have never really related to being a woman, and god knows I’ve tried. Being female really makes no sense to me at all. I was told that once I met the right man I would feel different, mum still lives in hope some guy will come and make me all broody and bring out me maternal instincts, but as I’m 40 that’s never happened and I’m certain it won’t. Being female has been a huge inconvenience to me, I try to ignore it and hope it might go away, but it hasn’t yet.

Weird (thumper of trumpanzees) Eddie
Weird (thumper of trumpanzees) Eddie
3 years ago

snort memes up their cock

that’s… ummmm…

….

Troubelle: Moonbeam Malcontent + Bard of the New Movement
Troubelle: Moonbeam Malcontent + Bard of the New Movement
3 years ago

@Weird Eddie

I may have derived it from Joel of Vinesauce, who once advised his watchers not to snort memes up their cock[i]hole.[/i] This was after something profoundly nonsensical happened.

dreemr
dreemr
3 years ago

@dslucia & @EJ

I was weirdly addicted to watching American History X for a few months in the late 90s.

“racism is a thing done by clearly-evil skinheads with swastika tattoos, and if you’re not one of them you can’t be a racist”

I’m surprised by that reading of it, because to me the message was the complete opposite of that: that you could be a regular, ordinary person in a regular, ordinary working-class family, and still dive deeply into a world defined by hatred and bigotry.

Because that’s the kind of household I grew up in. White, working-class, casual and outspoken racism and bigotry. Who knows how I may have reacted to a trauma like their family sustained?

I found the film kind of hypnotic. I haven’t watched it since then, but at the time I rewatched it at least 5 or 6 times.

Weird (thumper of trumpanzees) Eddie
Weird (thumper of trumpanzees) Eddie
3 years ago

Re: racism is a thing done by…

I read a while back a treatise saying that one of the triumphs of racism is the idea that racism is done by evil-minded people to others.

Racism is not individual. Racism is systemic. Organizations are racist. Systems are racist, institutions are racist, hierarchies are racist. People are bigots, and the evil they do is bigotry.

Bigotry is racist (and sexist, and ableist, and ageist and etc), because bigotry supports, reaffirms and reinforces the oppression of systems, institutions, organizations, etc., and bigotry allows the continuation of that oppression.

Pavlovs House
Pavlovs House
3 years ago

@Gussie Jives

“By that token though, anything named after Jeffery Amherst definitely needs to be renamed. That dude was a straight out smallpox-blanket white supremacist.”

Wow, Jeffery Amherst has come up on WHTM! (Testimony to the intelligence and knowledge of the commenter community here).

As to the point, though, *yes* Amherst was Anglo-supremacist to a level exceptional for even his British contemporaries. He essentially single-handedly started Pontiac’s War (so much so that one of Amherst’s modern biographers, William R. Nester, says that it pretty much ought to just be called “Amherst’s War”. Some of Amherst’s subordinates told him *repeatedly* regarding the Delawares, Shawnees, some of the Ottowas and the other Ohio Valley and Great Lakes region peoples, more or less [paraphrasing] “if you do not treat these people as allies, equals and political partners they will go to war with us. To treat them as political partners and allies means we have to pay them the price they have set for the asset that their political partnership constitutes.” That price was material goods which the British and Anglo-Americans had always paid. Amherst, though, was stuck in this mindset that they were just “lazy savages” and by no means would he reward their laziness with the “gifts” they “demanded”. So, sure enough, by mid-1763 a lot of native peoples in the region have had it with Amherst and launch attacks. The British army of that period did have plenty of commanders who were pretty effective at negotiating and maintaining alliances with Native Americans (that doesn’t mean they weren’t also Anglo-supremacist — just that they were not as inept and virulent about it as Amherst whose ineptness and virulence actually propelled them into a war that was completely unnecessary. (I’m getting a lot of this from Nester’s _”Haughty Conquerors”: Amherst and the Great Indian Uprising of 1763_ (London: Praeger, 2000). (which the Wikipedia article on Amherst doesn’t cite by the way). It was the first real examination of Amherst, or at least this phase of his career, for a long time. Your humble commenter here has also published a teensy tad-bit and given a paper or two on old Amherst — not that such insulates me or anyone from challenge (why no, in the spirit of scholarship, just the opposite in fact…historians love to argue.)

As for the whole smallpox blankets thing, some of the more recent evidence is that Henry Bouquet first advanced the idea but Amherst is guilty of approving it and he wasn’t unenthusiastic about doing so. Using biological and chemical agents (or what we would now call biological and chemical agents) wasn’t unknown in eighteenth-century warfare, even in Europe, but obviously that doesn’t make it right (or make even “conventional” war right, at any rate).

So, indeed, Amherst does not deserve commemoration.

By the way, Amherst was also responsible for directing the use of (rather heavy-handed) use of force is putting down the Gordon Riots in 1780. (Not that the motives of the rioters were all that noble, obviously, but it still shows the temper of Amherst).

And, wow, eighteenth-century British military history came up on a WHTM post! Makes the inhabitants of Pavlov’s House happy (despite our nick, that field along with nursing are indeed the specialities around here.)

Be well, everyone, and get well David!

dslucia
dslucia
3 years ago

@dreemr:

That’s actually pretty much why I would’ve liked to have seen more time spent on the “transitional” periods. I think Cameron’s proselytizing could’ve had more screen-time, and the revelation that the dad was a racist cop was great, but they tried to cram the entire revelation into a single night so I thought the implication that that led Derek down the path to indoctrination by Cameron seemed a bit rushed. Granted, drawing out those sorts of sequences could potentially have just dragged the film down when it was already so full of scenes that are super charged, so maybe keeping it streamlined was for the best.

Jesalin
Jesalin
3 years ago

@Pavlov

Holy hell…and we have a whole bloody town named after this jackass?!

Dalillama: Irate Social Engineer

@Jesalin
At least you’ve only got 1. We’ve got at least 6 in the States.

Pavlovs House
Pavlovs House
3 years ago

@Jesalin and @Dalillama

Yeah, there are a bunch here. Part of that is because Seven Years’ War related toponyms in general proliferated all over the colonies in the 1760s, especially in the case of naming places after military and political figures that the Anglo-American colonists idealized (i.e., King of Prussia, PA for Frederick II; I think some of the various counties and towns named Brunswick are named after the ducky in Germany while others are actually named for Prince Ferdinand, Duke of Brunswick, the successful commander of the Allied army in Germany during the Seven Years’ War).

I think Amherst was a hero to the Anglo-Americans because first, well, he was successful militarily in the conventional part of the Seven Years’ War in North America. I will give him credit as a strategist in that he succeeded in coordinating multiple forces starting *very* far apart and converging on Montreal; he was able to modulate the pace of his own advance from Oswego down the St. Lawrence with Murray’s coming from the other direction along St. Lawrence and that third force coming up the Hudson-Lake Champlain axis of advance. Coordinating that kind of converging attack when the three starting points were so far apart was *not* easy given eighteenth-century logistics. The Anglo-American colonists also liked him because unlike SO many other British commanders he actually could work with and was willing to respect colonial legislatures and the Anglo-American colonial elite. But his policy towards the Native Americans was not only vile but simply very foolish and ill-founded. Plenty of his contemporaries provided a much better model. James Grant and Archibald Montgomery understood Cherokee politics and culture enough actually to help negotiate a peace with them during the 1759-61 Anglo-Cherokee War even though they were themselves officers commanding forces against the Cherokee. William Johnson and later Guy Johnson are both good examples too.

I think Amherst might have been remembered positively by eighteenth-century Anglo-Americans even after the Revolution for another reason — the North ministry offered Amherst command of the ground forces sent to put down the American Revolution in 1776. He refused, and only after that did they finally settle on William Howe. I’m not sure how much of Amherst’s refusal was for ideological reasons, but the Americans might have thought it was. I think I recall Amherst thinking using force on the rebellious colonists was a bad idea (and there hadn’t been clear agreement on that in the North ministry until 1775 anyway).

I judge Amherst as also having done a pretty good job militarily in arranging the defense of Great Britain against the planned Franco-Spanish invasion of 1779; in some earlier work I had an opportunity to look actually at the defensive plan and it wasn’t bad (main force up in Essex and I think (sorry, been a while) another in Kent at Coxheath that could react to a landing on the coast of Kent or Sussex; cavalry screening forces at road junctions; and a pretty ambitious plan to evacuate pretty much all livestock, horses, wheeled vehicles and grain from the coastal regions by gradually withdrawing it progressively according to a series of phase lines.

But his virulent racism and stubborn refusal to heed the advice of more culturally-aware British army officers during 1763-1764 outweighs the positive…by a lot. True, Henry Bouquet had some pretty vile ideas also, but Amherst was in charge and bears responsibility.

As a military historian, I think his career is worthy of study and there’s much to be learned from it but I don’t think people who care about equality today should find much reason to commemorate him as any kind of hero.

Thank you for reading!

Wow, eighteenth-century military history on WHTM!

Oh yeah, here’s a women’s history connection: during the invasion scare of 1779 a lot of local communities in the south of England raised money for defense by subscription. I’ve seen some of the lists of subscribers in the Amherst papers in the War Office records and there were a substantial amount of women involved. I always wanted to do more with that to see if I could find evidence on women’s leadership in that effort — women’s participation in eighteenth-century British politics is an interesting and growing field in history. (Despite proscription from nearly all every formal locus of power, many women of the middling-classes did have a material effect; e.g. shaping public opinion in newspapers, etc.)

kupo
kupo
3 years ago

Completely unrelated to anything, but I just discovered Life on Mars is on BritBox and of course one of my favorite weird-ass TV shows was originally British. I’m going to have a good day. 😀

Help someone struggling with disturbing fights at work
Help someone struggling with disturbing fights at work
3 years ago

Racism is not individual. Racism is systemic. Organizations are racist. Systems are racist, institutions are racist, hierarchies are racist. People are bigots, and the evil they do is bigotry.

Bigotry is racist (and sexist, and ableist, and ageist and etc), because bigotry supports, reaffirms and reinforces the oppression of systems, institutions, organizations, etc., and bigotry allows the continuation of that oppression.

So true.

Thank you @POM & @Virign Mary for answering my question, and anyone else whose name I missed.

Scildfreja Unnyðnes
Scildfreja Unnyðnes
3 years ago

@Help someone struggling, hello! I missed your question back there!

Can you give me a solid example that it’s not a feminist position that hardwired differences between the sexes don’t exist? This is an area of knowledge that I’m weak on.

So, you want something to point out that differences between sexes isn’t just a social construct? Well, all of biology does that pretty well, really.

(note, I am not a biologist!)

There’s this weird “Nature vs Nurture” thing that people struggle with, always have. They seem perfectly capable of accepting one or the other – gay people are born gay, or they’re socialized to it. Tall people are tall because of their genes, not because of their childhoods, etc. Either it’s genetic or it’s constructed by history. How you were born or how you were raised.

This is not a one-or-the-other proposition. People can, and do, certainly have genes for being tall. But those genes may not express if that person is malnourished as a child, for example. There may indeed be a “gay gene” (I’d put money on it), but it’s quite certainly also influenced by society.

So too with sex and gender expression. Someone with XY genes may or may not develop with all the male sexual characteristics based on a huge number of factors. Someone who is XX may express “male” personality traits due to biological influences as well as social influences.

(I sliced out a couple paragraphs of me whining about people using high school genetics knowledge to make sweeping statements about human beings here. This stuff is complicated and I think your friends need to give that some respect)

I’d just ask them “So how do you know that there’s no biology involved?” and then I’d start blathering on about hox genes and hormone gradients. That usually works over here.

Sorry, I’m rambling! I’d suggest you tell your co-workers that they’re arguing a Nature over Nurture problem, and would point out that it’s way more likely a mixture of both is true in any given case than it being purely one or the other. I’d also suggest that the real problem is why they’re so invested in it being a purely social construct instead of being genetic? Genes are not destiny.

You might make people cranky that way, but you’ll be right, and maybe a more nuanced position will help?

Either way, I’m gonna go poof for a bit. Too much computer this week. Ta tah!

davidknewton
3 years ago

Good luck, David – thanks for all you suffer through for us 🙂

Imaginary Petal
Imaginary Petal
3 years ago

This week: I quit buying bread forever. My home made Manitoba cream bread is now perfected. I also made key lime pie ice pops and slipped in the tub. Progress!

Scildfreja Unnyðnes
Scildfreja Unnyðnes
3 years ago

ohmigod key lime icy pops

Imaginary Petal
Imaginary Petal
3 years ago
Pavlovs House
Pavlovs House
3 years ago

@Imaginary Petal

Whoa…..

I need to work out after just having *looked* at that….

Jesalin
Jesalin
3 years ago

I also made key lime pie ice pops

whimper

kupo
kupo
3 years ago

I’m more interested in the bread :d

eli
eli
3 years ago

I could go for bread OR key-lime pops.

But earlier today, I had the most exquisite culinary experience. All-you-can-eat, but not a buffet. They brought out small plates. Mumbai street food. They call it vegetarian (but it’s actually all vegan!). I don’t even really understand what all the the things that I ate were. You were served 10 items in three courses and when you got to the end, you could order more of anything. Everything was amazingly, unbelievably delicious. Colors, textures, sauces. Noodles, rice, wraps, burgers, dumplings, soup.

There were these little puffy, hollow pastry-like shells with diced chickpea/potato filling that you filled with tamarind sauce and and mint sauce and you put the whole thing in your mouth and it was an explosion of yum.

This is a very dangerous development because they are only open weekends, but they are on the way home from work and I work on weekends!! At least, in their dedication to avoiding food waste, they require reservations.

That is all, thank you for your time 🙂

dr. ej
dr. ej
3 years ago

I’m more interested in the bread :d

I’m with you kupo! I do have a loaf of boring sandwich bread rising in my kitchen right now, but IP’s bread sounds much better. I’m also learning to bake at high altitude since I now live at about 5000 ft above sea level. I forgot to take that into consideration last time. Oops!

Also, one of my favorite easy bread recipes for anyone who is interested. You don’t even have to knead it!

kupo
kupo
3 years ago

@dr. ej
I can’t have wheat but sounds yummy. Maybe I can adapt it to my flour blend.

Today I made regular sandwich bread (well, my regular anyway) and pizza dough. I made a change to my usual pizza dough that makes it more elastic, which makes it easier to stretch out. Yay!

I tried to make injera the other day but it was still wet after cooking to the instructions and I was worried about eating it raw like that because the instructions just had you put flour and water together and let it sit for several days. A typical sourdough mother involves a lot of caring for your little yeast colony, feeding it regularly so it doesn’t get weak, even testing the pH levels sometimes all to ensure the yeast is healthy so you’re not growing potentially pathogenic bacteria colonies. It made me nervous so I didn’t eat it (I tried cooking several pancakes from the batter with the same results). Anyway I need to read up on that one more and maybe deviate from the traditional recipe to apply my usual sourdough techniques so I have peace of mind. 🙂

dr. ej
dr. ej
3 years ago

@kupo
I’ve never made injera, but as a food microbiologist, I’d probably say you made the right choice not eating it. You can’t always tell what’s growing in there.

My bread turned out OK. I might need to adjust the baking time/temperature. I was working with a regular recipe and generic instructions for baking at altitude, so it might not have been perfect.

I also made sweet potato and black bean tacquitos for dinner, so I’d say it was a successful day in the kitchen!

Scented Fucking Hard Chairs
Scented Fucking Hard Chairs
3 years ago

Everyone’s talking about their cooking skills and I once blew up a microwave trying to warm a wheat bag.

Imaginary Petal
Imaginary Petal
3 years ago

@kupo et al

Here’s the bread!

http://i66.tinypic.com/a43j7l.jpg

And, yes, that’s Demi circling perilously close.

Speaking of sourdough, that’s my next bread project. 🙂 I started a sourdough base yesterday.

Imaginary Petal
Imaginary Petal
3 years ago

@SFHC

What the hell is a wheat bag? Anyways, I’d trade a few key lime ice pops for your encyclopedic memory. 🙂

numerobis
numerobis
3 years ago

I also made bread this weekend! It didn’t quite turn out how I intended, but it’s still good. I have to continue trying…

Whole wheat with kasha.

Pavlovs House
Pavlovs House
3 years ago

Does anyone here make flatbreads?