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"ethics" alt-right antifeminism empathy deficit evil SJWs men who should not ever be with women ever misogyny sargon of akkad YouTube

VIDEO: Sargon of Akkad and pals literally laughing out loud about the murder of a fellow YouTuber

The Skeptic Feminists; Heather “Ivy” Anable is on the right

In the wake of the horrific murder of YouTuber Heather “Ivy” Anable, apparently at the hands of Aleksandr Kolpakov, one of her fellow cohosts of the Skeptic Feminist Youtube channel, some of YouTube’s most noxious personalities got together for a nearly two-and-a-half hour livestream dealing with the tragedy.

The livestreamers in question included the noxious Sargon of Akkad — I’ve written about him several times before — alongside lesser-known YouTube shitheads called Vee and Kraut and Tea, among others.

Despite the ostensible subject, the livestream turned out to be a rather lighthearted affair, full of jokes at the expense of the murdered woman and lots of what the participants called “gallows humor.” (There were similar outbursts of inappropriate mirth from antifeminists on Twitter and elsewhere online, as I detailed in a post yesterday.)

YouTuber Michael Rowlands has done us all a service by clipping some of the worst moments from the livestream and putting them in a thankfully much, much shorter video of his own. It’s only 8 minutes long, and you can skip the first minute or so, but I think it manages to capture the odiousness of Sargon and pals quite effectively.

Just a note of explanation: Rowlands’ video is designed to highlight the blatant hypocrisy of YouTuber Kraut and Tea. The first half consists of a clip from a Kraut and Tea video patting anti-SJW YouTubers on the back for their alleged moral superiority over SJWs. The second half is a clip from the notorious livestream, which pretty clearly shows what complete bullshit his claims of moral superiority really are.

I set the start of the video a little ahead to bypass some of Kraut and Tea’s more tedious bloviating and get right to his main point.

Thanks to commenter IshinDenshin for letting me know about this video. If you want to watch the whole livestream (ugh) you can find it here.

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PeeVee the (Timber-Rattling Booger Slut, But Noice) Sarcastic
PeeVee the (Timber-Rattling Booger Slut, But Noice) Sarcastic
3 years ago

WWTH:

Humina.

That is all.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ fran

There is a very funny history book called 1066 And All That

That’s where I learned most of my history; before Horrible Histories came along (the HH books are actually very accurate though).

If you like quirky English stuff you may enjoy Nigel Molesworth, if you haven’t encountered him already. The books are very funny.

“As any fule kno”

DanHolme
DanHolme
3 years ago

@Alan and Fran

You may find this amusing/interesting: On the UK caving forum, someone has posted about a major Yorkshire landmark being used in a Bollywood horror series.

Everyone’s favourite Tolkeinesque scramble, Gordale Scar, in ‘1920: London’, a sort of Hindi Evil Dead: https://youtu.be/PdrTQmsxzpU

I watched ‘1920 – Evil Returns’ on YouTube, and do you know, I quite liked it. But not everyone’s a horror fan, so it might not be your cup of tea.

But Gordale Scar is an awesome spot.

Arctic Ape
Arctic Ape
3 years ago

@NickNameNick

Britain is Bizzaro Japan and Japan is Bizzaro Britain

In the 1980s it was often said Finland was the “Japan of Europe” because both countries made a spectacular economic rise after being set back by WWII.

In the early 1990s, a depression hit hard first on Finland and then Japan shortly afterwards. Some wise cracker then referred to Japan as “Finland of Asia”.

@Alan

It’s Britannia rule the waves, not ‘rules’.

Basically it’s saying make sure you have the biggest navy if you want to keep Britain safe. So it’s more campaigning for something rather than bragging.

Britannia waive the rules?

@IP

Speaking of which, I’ve been thinking of starting up a Patreon page dedicated to White Genocide. Anybody interested?

What would one do with that Patreon money?

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ Dan

But Gordale Scar is an awesome spot.

I empathise with the chap who fell down it in that video. I’ve mentioned before about climbing up and getting stuck so I had to walk the long way back to the car (four frikkin’ miles!).

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

Be more honest to say “Impossible climb down”.

http://i.imgur.com/luU9VuN.jpg

DanHolme
DanHolme
3 years ago

@ Alan

A four mile walk through limestone pavement sounds really good to me right now.

I read a great, quirky YA book the other day called ‘Tiger, Tiger’ by Melvin Burgess. In it, the area you were walking through has been turned into a huge reserve for the world’s last few tigers. There’s a plot by criminals to harvest the tigers for their organs, and one of the tigers turns into a human and hunts down the conspirators with the help of the son of a pub landlord from Malham. ‘Were-tigers of the Craven Karst’ could be the subtitle. One of the weirdest Dales novels I’ve ever read, and highly recommended.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ Dan

A four mile walk through limestone pavement sounds really good to me right now.

Try doing it in Winter, in Converse.

‘Were-tigers of the Craven Karst’ could be the subtitle.

I wonder if anyone has ever managed a walk on the moors without ending up reeling off quotes from “American Werewolf in London”?

DanHolme
DanHolme
3 years ago

@Alan

Been there, done that. January 2005, I walked the length of Hadrian’s Wall in my trainers, with no accommodation, in the snow, because I was too tight to pay the bus fare. I slept in the phone box outside Lanercost Priory the first night, somewhere on the wall the next two nights, and didn’t bother sleeping at all the last night. Good times, and one of my toes has nearly recovered!

…and if you tell that to the young people today, they won’t believe you!

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ Dan

I love that the Vindolanda letters have legionaries asking their mums to send extra socks and underpants. So you’re not the first person to freeze their ass off on that wall.

I also like that there’s a Latin word for underpants (‘subligaria’ in case you were wondering).

DanHolme
DanHolme
3 years ago

@Alan

I didn’t have to go as far as flogging myself with nettles for warmth, like the legionaries (reportedly) did. Not while I was on the wall, anyway. 😉

If I ever write a comedy fantasy novel, ‘Subligaria’ will be the name of a small nation in which several of the protagonists go on holiday.

opposablethumbs
opposablethumbs
3 years ago

Walked along (I can’t remember how much of) Hadrian’s Wall once when I was a kid, with a little group of siblings and friends (we had tents, though) to the tune of that old marching song

one kilometre on foot, it wears out, it wears out –
one kilometre on foot, it we-ears out your shoes.
two kilometres on foot ….”

(for all our francophone Mammotheers 🙂 )
Yeah, we thought we were so funny.

DanHolme
DanHolme
3 years ago

@Opposablethumbs

I’ve not heard that one before, but as marching songs go it was certainly accurate. My shoes held on a bit longer than my feet, but finally gave up when I fell down a small cliff at Cheddar Gorge. I was fine but the shoes broke their stitching – I literally popped my clogs!

I should make it clear I didn’t walk to Cheddar from Hadrian’s Wall; this wasn’t some variant on the British geography in ‘Robin Hood – Prince of Thieves’, where all the more recognisable landmarks are stacked right next to each other.

Rhuu - apparently an illiterati
Rhuu - apparently an illiterati
3 years ago

I was watching a documentary and they mentioned these mysterious Roman dodecahedron artifacts. Since this was a slightly older documentary, i googled to see if there was any more information.

There was an idea!

I like how someone printed off a 3D model and just played with it.

Gussie Jives
Gussie Jives
3 years ago

It bloody well wasn’t, and that’s a part of the myth that’s most fucking annoying to me. The United Provinces had been a republic for centuries already, not to mention the Most Serene Republic of Venice, the Iroquois Confederacy, the Swiss Confederation, the Republic of Salé… I could go on.

Damn, even I ain’t safe from falling into the myth! Fair cop!

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ rhuu

mysterious Roman dodecahedron artifacts.

Wow, that was interesting. And I do find that suggestion plausible. They remind me a bit of that thing we did at school where you’d stick nails in a cotton reel to knit stuff. And we know the Romans wore wooly gloves; there’s an interesting ‘curse letter’ from the Bath find, calling down misfortune on someone who nicked the writer’s gloves.

I’d be very interested in what our resident handicraft experts think of the theory.

Newt
Newt
3 years ago

@Arctice Ape

Speaking of which, I’ve been thinking of starting up a Patreon page dedicated to White Genocide. Anybody interested?

What would one do with that Patreon money?

Spend it on high-end recording equipment. Then, once a month, ramble into a webcam for a few minutes and publish the result as a “backers’ update”.

opposablethumbs
opposablethumbs
3 years ago

@DanHolme, I’d learned it in French lessons (iirc) – in French it actually scans and rhymes; we thought we were being the height of hilarity because word-for-word in English it does neither. Pretentious, moi ? :-s

DanHolme
DanHolme
3 years ago

@opposable thumbs

Languages were certainly not my strong suit at school, so I’m impressed that your younger self understood it well enough to know why you were being funny, however funny it actually was.

I haven’t taught much Roman history this year, but the one Roman invention that every student goes away remembering is the sponge on a stick…

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ Dan

the sponge on a stick…

It’s just clicked with me that, in the gospels, the Roman soldiers give Jesus wine (described as like vinegar) on a sponge on a stick. I’d previously assumed that was just so they could reach him up on the cross. But maybe there’s more to it. Hmm, wonder if anyone’s commented on this possibly before?

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

A very cursory Google search doesn’t bring up an references to suggestions it was a toilet stick. What’s interesting it that the purported sponge is treasured as a relic. Can’t help but think they might have actually found a toilet stick and not realised it.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holy_Sponge

DanHolme
DanHolme
3 years ago

@Alan

Interesting idea! A glance at a few Xtian websites – some more reasonable than others – suggest the point of the sour wine itself was a form of mockery, in keeping with other aspects of the crucifixion. So the idea that the sponge was actually befouled in another way, would be in keeping with the tradition.

(((VioletBeauregarde))): Liberal Snowflake Social Justice Necromancer
(((VioletBeauregarde))): Liberal Snowflake Social Justice Necromancer
3 years ago

Me and my curiousity…I watched part of the full video but then rage-quit after a while. That was ~10 minutes of my life I’ll NEVER get back 🙁

My heart goes out to Ivy’s family and friends.

I can’t believe that anyone would fucking JOKE about this!

Dalillama: Irate Social Engineer

@DanHolme

Interesting idea! A glance at a few Xtian websites – some more reasonable than others – suggest the point of the sour wine itself was a form of mockery, in keeping with other aspects of the crucifixion.

That seems like rather a stretch to me, honestly. Water mixed with vinegar or wine (usually not good wine, because you want to actually enjoy that stuff) is better than straight water for moistening your mouth when it’s dry; or at any rate makes it feel better. Lemon juice or the like works fine too, but hasn’t always been as easily available. It had never once occurred to me that there was any greater significance than that to the scene described.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ dalillama

It had never once occurred to me that there was any greater significance than that to the scene described.

We were taught in junior school that it was all part of the Romans being horrible; and that’s general Catholic mythology.

But when we did the RE A level, and it got a bit more nuanced, there were more theories. One is that it was in fact a mixture of analgesics, so they were being a bit nice. There’s also apparently a type of wine, that was very popular with soldiers, that is a bit vinegary. Now I’m trying to remember the name!

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

ETA:

This stuff:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Posca

(Quite fancy trying some now, sounds surprisingly nice)

Dalillama: Irate Social Engineer

@Alan

We were taught in junior school that it was all part of the Romans being horrible; and that’s general Catholic mythology.

Many strains of Christian theology share that one, and treat the line about ‘my followers will be persecuted in my name’ as being a universal absolute. Hence why theres preachers on tv banging on about how Christianity is the most persecuted religion in the world today, and cries of ‘anti-Christan persecution’ anytime their privileges are questioned.

One is that it was in fact a mixture of analgesics, so they were being a bit nice.

Not that nice. There’s no way in hell a spongeful of watered ration wine is going to have any appreciable analgesic effect, and nobody would know that better than a legionnaire.

There’s also apparently a type of wine, that was very popular with soldiers, that is a bit vinegary. Now I’m trying to remember the name!

Posca. Sour watered wine carried by legionnaires on the march. For the reasons I noted above, in fact.

ETA:
Posted without refreshing, didn’t see you’d found it

Francesca Torpedo, Femoid Special Forces Major
Francesca Torpedo, Femoid Special Forces Major
3 years ago

@Alan

Re: Horrible Histories

Ooh, I watched them on the Youtubes.

They’re quite good, although what I took away most from them was the white supremacists in the comment section abloobloobloo’ing about HH casting black women and men in various skits tackling Roman and European Medieval history.

“BUT MUH ALL-WHITE EUROPE” and so on.

I’ll check out your recommendation; I’ve been looking for new books to read.

So far I’m reading about the Boer wars and the Voortrekker – fiction and nonfiction.

Of course, being a staunch Empire girl, I want the Boers to fail.

PaganReader - Misandrist Spinster

abloobloobloo’ing

I love that so much.

NickNameNick
NickNameNick
3 years ago

@Fran:

I take it you’re interested in my alt-history novel pitch, then?

I am! Tangent timelines/alternate realities are a weakness of mine, especially in superhero comics.

(Sorry for the late reply.)

EJ (the Scheming Liberal Race-Traitor)

So far I’m reading about the Boer wars and the Voortrekker – fiction and nonfiction.

Oh hey there.

I grew up hearing about the War Against the English from my maternal grandparents. It’s an interesting topic to study from a gender point of view, because (for the Afrikaner side at least) the male experience of the war was so utterly different from the female experience. The Black experience of the war was again entirely different, and it’s something I know less about than I’d like to.

If you’re approaching it from a heroic-Boys-Own-war-stories angle, then I’d recommend reading Commando:
A Boer account of the Boer War
by Deneys Reitz. In many ways it’s a smarter book than the author intended it to be, because it perfectly encapsulates the youthful war-is-great-fun narrative that a lot of late 19th century culture dwelt on. However, it should be emphasised that this is a primary source: there’s very little context for the events Reitz recounts. Unless you know what the Jameson Raid was, or what happened at Lyndenburg and Paardeberg, you might miss some of the implications.

If you’re into fiction, thenOp Soek Na Generaal Mannetjies Mentz is definitely worth reading, and also goes into the female experience of the war. I think you can get it in English.

kuumba
kuumba
3 years ago

For all the “normies” out there. Like me. Don’t click on the link to the full video. I haven’t even seen the short one, but I will later. You would give views and that is what those lowlifes are after. Thanks.

kuumba
kuumba
3 years ago

And “edit”: I couldn’t even follow that one. The discussion was way too dumb.

I know it is a bit stupid, but it’s nice to see that there are others like me (I’m talking about you, David) that like to see what these…unusual internet entities are saying just to see what the scourge of the internet is trying to push forward.

And thanks for letting my “normie” comments go through.

Victoria
Victoria
3 years ago

So if we’re still talking about bloodlines, I guess I’ll throw my 2 cents in. so i confirmed a while ago that I am 1/8th Cherokee, my dad is 1/4 and my grandpa was 1/2 (I do the math sometimes because for the longest time I just assumed they and I by extension were all white).

but I’m, in looks and experience a super super white person. I’m honestly really curious about this aspect of my ancestry and want to learn more about it, but I don’t really feel comfortable claiming it even though I know it’s true. Like I don’t know if it’d be right, ya know? I’ve never faced any of the issues that native people face. Heck, apparently when my dad was a kid some people used to think he was black, not native. And I don’t know anything about my grandpa’s experiences.

Unlike my dad I’m super pale. like not as pale as other white people can get but I’m up there in the pale o meter.

does anyone else have some complicated feelings on stuff like this? I’m caught between wanting to explore my history/family background and not wanting to intrude on the spaces of people who need it.

Croquembouche, poorly-dressed vandal
Croquembouche, poorly-dressed vandal
3 years ago

@ Victoria, I have no personal experience of this, but I found these 2 novels fascinating:
The first:
http://www.kingsolver.com/books/the-bean-trees.html
A debut novel in which a feisty young white woman unofficially adopts a Cherokee foundling baby. It’s a terrific book except for the assumptions it implied about abused ethnic babies having nobody who cares about them.
I like to imagine that at some point a member of the Cherokee Nation came to the author and said
“””Dude, that’s pretty insulting to our people, educate yourself”” and the result was her follow up novel:”
https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-06-016801-8
The character Annawake Fourkiller makes these points and many others pretty plainly.
It also has loads of detail on Cherokee Nation history and law, especially regarding eligibility for membership, and has a woman who had always considered herself solely white re-connecting with her Cherokee family.
The character Cash Stillwater particularly resonates with me because I’ve known many members of the Stolen Generation here in Australia with that same sadness at their heart, trying to form the families they never had themselves, seeing a different kind of lostness descend on their kids, and carrying on as best they could.