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aggrieved entitlement alpha males alt-right creepy cuck daily stormer empathy deficit entitled babies literal nazis men who should not ever be with women ever misogyny racism slut shaming

Alt-Right “traditionalists” don’t understand the world they want us to return to, part 973

Cover detail from Sept-Oct 1960 issue of “Going Steady,” a comic book aimed at teen girls

No one should be turning to the neo-Nazi online tabloid The Daily Stormer for dating advice, but on the off chance that you are, I have to warn you that they don’t know what they’re talking about.

I mean, they don’t know what they’re talking about when it comes to pretty much everything, but in this case their ignorance involves what actually went on in the supposed 1950s cultural paradise they want to return us to, forcibly if necessary.

In a post with the sarcastic title “Dating Advice: The Key to Good Relationships is Cheating on Your Boyfriends,” regular Daily Stormer contributor “Zeiger” takes aim at a “fat Paki skag” dating expert who has the temerity to argue that women searching for “the One” should date a bunch of guys casually before committing to one of them.

I know, shocking.

Well, it is to Zeiger.

Not so long ago, women didn’t feel like they needed dating advice. After all, they just had to stand around somewhere until a man came to them and took care of everything for them.

All they had to worry about was serving him beer and cooking his food right so he didn’t dump their ungrateful asses.

Zeiger illustrates this point with a magazine illustration from the 1950s depicting happy teenage girls learning to bake a cake, so it’s pretty clear what romanticized past Zeiger is harking back to.

Alas, we have fallen so far from this imaginary paradise!

But in the era of NUMALE faggots and Jew feminism, women are confused. They think it’s somehow their job to understand relationships. This is already a completely insane concept.

But it gets worse.

These days, they’re getting their relationship advice from insane Paki sluts.

The “Paki slut” in question is a “relationship coach” named Sami Wunder who was recently featured in the British tabloid The Express. Despite Zeiger’s headline, Wunder does not actually suggest that women cheat on their boyfriends. Rather, she recommends that women looking for a husband date multiple men, non-exclusively, holding off on serious committment until one of them pops the question.

Whatever you think of this advice, it’s hardly “cheating” to date more than one person when you’re not in an exclusive relationship, presuming everyone is on the up and up on this.

Zeiger is outraged by the very idea.

I guarantee that no real man would “put a ring” on the finger of some hoe who cheated on him with a bunch of other guys. A “man” so pussy-whipped would more appropriately be called a “humanoid slug.” …

What this shows is the urgent need women have for stable, healthy relationships. And that is something that can only be provided by WHITE SHARIA – not fat Paki whore dating advice.

Zeiger’s anger here seems to stem from the same mix of entitlement and insecurity that drives the alt-right obsession with “cucks” and “cucking.” These are men who, on some level, feel entitled to any attractive woman who wanders into their field of vision, and feel betrayed — even “cucked” — when any of these women date or marry or just have sex with some guy other than them.

But we’re not just entitlement we’re dealing with here. More than a few alt-rightist dudes — and manosphere dudes generally — fetishize nubile young virgins, not just because they’re creepy dudes who are way too into women and girls far too young for them, but because virgins have no way to compare their sexual prowess with other men. Many manosphere dudes are quite open about this anxiety, complaining that women who’ve been with more than one guy will endlessly compare them with their earlier partners.

These are the same guys who go around boasting about what “alphas” they are.

But there’s another giant irony in Zeiger’s piece: dating in the 1950s, at least at the start of the decade, looked a lot more like Wunder’s world than Zeigers in some crucial respects.

In the 40s and early 50s, teenagers were encouraged to “play the field,” casually dating an assortment of not-quite-steady partners rather than committing to a single person.

It wasn’t until later in the decade that teens began to shift en masse to the more familiar (to us, that is) strategy of “going steady.” And far from welcoming this new monogamy, many parents were horrified. Magazines at the time were filled with alarming articles on the supposedly grave dangers of going steady.

Here’s one from 1960 warning teens that going steady might be “too dangerous” for them.

Here’s one from 1957 examining the potential “immorality” of going steady.

And here’s a graphic from a pamphlet or magazine article from the era wondering when it was “too early” for teens to go steady.

And parents actually had some legitimate reasons to worry. On the one hand, they worried that teens who “went steady” without dating around first would settle down with the first person of the opposite sex who was nice to them, not realizing they could have done better.

On the other hand, they worried that teens who “went steady” would also end up going further sexually — which could lead, as sex often does, to pregnancy and too-early marriage. Indeed, the age of first marriage dropped precipitously in the 1950s as more teens married, helping to contribute to the spiraling divorce rates of the 1960s and 1970s as these too-hasty marriages fell apart.

It was kind of a screwed-up decade; happily, the sexual revolution of the 1960s convinced a hefty chunk of Americans young and old that 1) sex isn’t the end of the world and 2) it isn’t always such a great idea for teens to settle down forever with the very first person they have sex with.

The weird thing is that the 1950s parents, for all their faults, were more interested in girls and young women having choices than are the alt-rightists of today.

Parents in the 1950s worried that their daughters would end up getting too seriously involved with the wrong guys because they had no good basis for comparison.

Alt-rightists and manosphere dudes today are apparently afraid that no women will settle for them if they realize there are other men out there who aren’t, you know, reactionary racists who think women shouldn’t really be allowed to make their own decisions about anything.

I’m thinking they’re probably right to worry about this. And I’m glad.

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DanHolme
DanHolme
3 years ago

@AlanRobertshaw

Oh, that is cool. Cheers for that, I’d never heard of it.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ Dan

What I find particularly tantalising is that the initial suggested dates for the Silverpit impact were 60-66 million years ago. And we now know multiple asteroid strikes are not uncommon.

So is it part of the Chixulub (sp?) one? Who knows? I’ll merely point out there are no dinosaurs in Yorkshire now and that would explain why.

opposablethumbs
opposablethumbs
3 years ago

there are no dinosaurs in Yorkshire now

ahem. Open to question. David Davis is a tory MP in that part of the world, to name but one!

EJ (Marxist Jazz Weasel)

Ahem. I would remind you that all birds are dinosaurs, taxonomically speaking. This means that there are dozens – possibly hundreds of thousands of dozens – of dinosaurs currently alive in Yorkshire.

Redsilkphoenix: Jetpack Vixen, Agent of the FemiNest Collective; Keeper of a Hell Toupee, and all-around Intergalactic Meanie
Redsilkphoenix: Jetpack Vixen, Agent of the FemiNest Collective; Keeper of a Hell Toupee, and all-around Intergalactic Meanie
3 years ago

Semi-OT, given the course of some of this thread (I haven’t caught up on it yet, so don’t know what else has been talked about here):

A Frank and Ernest cartoon that came out today that I thought appropriate to the subject matter on hand about jobs, and the fact that this site gets a fair amount of trolls from time to time as well.

http://synd.imgsrv.uclick.com/comics/fk/2017/fk170508.gif

http://www.gocomics.com/frank-and-ernest/2017/05/08

It made me smile, at least.

Arctic Ape
Arctic Ape
3 years ago

AsAboveSoBelow:

@Alan: Thanks for the map. Doggerland is fascinating. I like to think about what the land looked like, and how the people lived and moved about, where they might have had their homes.

Seconding. Although it must have sucked to be last people living on Dogger Bank.

Dan Holme:

I agree – when you see horse and reindeer bones, and flint tools, dragged up from the bottom of the North Sea, a whole vanished continent really, it’s quite moving. I would have loved to see something like Lake Lapworth or Lake Pickering for real instead of just inside my head.

The Baltic Sea was also a giant lake around 9000 years ago, before sea level rose to fill the Danish straits. The Ancylus Lake was actually larger than the current Baltic Sea, because of subsequent massive isostatic rise in the northern parts of the region.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancylus_Lake

During this period, the outflow channel of Baltic Sea moved from central Sweden to Denmark, due to uneven isostatic rise. However, the outflow had also been in Denmark a couple thousand years earlier, when the channel in Sweden was still blocked by ice.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ artic ape

Ancylus Lake

Geology is obviously a scam by cartographers so we keep having to buy new maps.

That was really interesting though.

Wasn’t the Mediterranean just a valley once; before the pillars of hercules collapsed? I was somewhat surprised when I saw a relief map of the seafloor there. It was just so complex with all the huge mountains and channels. I’d sort of got it in my head it was just a like a big shallow lake.

opposablethumbs
opposablethumbs
3 years ago

Alan, there is a blinding xkcd – can’t call it a cartoon, it was more a phenomenon – about that Mediterranean valley. It was a single frame updated every hour for …. I dunno, multiple hundreds of hours … which (when it was of course collated by devoted xkcd fans) formed a sort of animation. It became the focus of a discussion forum thread that thrived for weeks if not months, and afaik both the forum thread and the cartoon itself are still preserved.

I think it was called Time. Ring a bell with any Mammotheers?

Hambeast, disorderly she-tornado and breaker of windows
Hambeast, disorderly she-tornado and breaker of windows
3 years ago

Alan – I had no idea the explosion of martial arts started so early! I’ve always wanted to take some classes; maybe someone teaches Bartitsu here in SoCal. *googles* And, nope! Back to surveying other martial arts…

Alan and Don – I just really like that particular talk; Ed Brayton is both a legal wonk (though not a lawyer) and a former stand-up performer.

Arctic Ape
Arctic Ape
3 years ago

The dry Mediterranean during Messinian period must have been really impressive, like a very upscaled version of Dead Sea. I understand it’s going to happen again in few million years, as Africa squeezes against Europe.

Dalillama: Irate Social Engineer

Wasn’t the Mediterranean just a valley once; before the pillars of hercules collapsed? I was somewhat surprised when I saw a relief map of the seafloor there. It was just so complex with all the huge mountains and channels. I’d sort of got it in my head it was just a like a big shallow lake.

It’s gone back and forth; when it was landlocked it evaporated, and then a few million years ago the Strait of Gibraltar formed and the Atlantic rushed in. There’s apparently huge salt deposits on the bottom from this.

Manly Wade Wellman put the Atlantean civilization in that valley, and his Cro-Magnon hero Hok the Mighty was responsible for setting off a volcano that opened the Strait and drowned Atlantis. I forget the details; some kind of monstrous octopus or crocodile or something was involved too, IIRC.

Arctic Ape
Arctic Ape
3 years ago

Geology is obviously a scam by cartographers so we keep having to buy new maps.

Isostatic land rise in northern Baltic Sea is actually a Finnish government program to make this country great again. Updating the maps is just a necessary hassle for us, and everyone else.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ hambeast

I had no idea the explosion of martial arts started so early!

Or the obsession with all things Japanese! Edwardian London must have been full of Otaku.

Bartitsu has gotten a bit of a revival with the steampunk peeps, so if you have any local enthusiasts they may be worth an ask. Otherwise, if you want to chat martial arts and self defence, hey you know me.

weirwoodtreehugger: chief manatee

EJ,

And many corvid species are just as terrifying as anything in Jurassic Park.

They’re too smart. It’s disquieting.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

Thanks for all the Med info folks. And I’ll definitely be looking out for that xxkd animation.

I once swam through some tunnel on Gozo to try to reach the sea. Just as it got pitch black I heard the ‘chug chug chug’ of a boat engine; so I nearly got to know the bottom of the Med through personal experience.

Troubelle: Moonbeam Malcontent + Bard of the New Movement
Troubelle: Moonbeam Malcontent + Bard of the New Movement
3 years ago

@opposablethumbs

“Time” rings a bell with me very clearly.

Lysistrata
Lysistrata
3 years ago

Re the Hated Ones From the Next Village Over

I’m visiting Ireland. Yesterday I saw the walls in Belfast that separate the Catholic and Protestent neighbourhoods. Bloody huge things, 30 feet in places. They still lock the gates at night, unlock in the morning. I was shocked, truly.

The plan is the walls will be down by 2023. There is still a lot of bad feeling among the people who lived through the Troubles. Hate towards people a block away, just the other side of the wall. Guess I’m still shocked.

opposablethumbs
opposablethumbs
3 years ago

Did you follow Time at the, er, time, Troubelle? I liked it a lot, but I would have felt so frustrated if the Serious Fans hadn’t collected all the images to make it possible to watch all together!
And I loved that fans were mapping the constellations visible in the night sky to calculate the date of the story thousands of years in the past. That lot are seriously ott.

Troubelle: Moonbeam Malcontent + Bard of the New Movement
Troubelle: Moonbeam Malcontent + Bard of the New Movement
3 years ago

@opposablethumbs

I was a bit late on the train to xkcd in general, but…I’m glad it happened.

Policy of Madness
Policy of Madness
3 years ago

@Alan

You can view Time here:

http://geekwagon.net/projects/xkcd1190/

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ POM

Cheers for that. That’s tomorrow’s diversionary behaviour sorted. 🙂

EJ (Marxist Jazz Weasel)

@WWTH:
Corvids are really smart. Some of them are smart enough to come up with solutions to experiments that animal-intelligence researchers hadn’t intended.

I want to see a remake of Jurassic Park in which the velociraptors were depicted as properly feathered. In my mind they look like chickens. Watching them smash stuff apart would be amazing.

weirwoodtreehugger: chief manatee

There’s been talk of a remake of The Birds. If there is, crows, ravens and magpies need to be the birds that attack. Because I could actually see a corvid apocalypse happening. I’m pretty sure the only reason that they haven’t pecked us all to death by now is that we leave all sorts of food scraps. If we stop being useful to them, it’s over.

comment image

*shudders*

Mooncustafer
Mooncustafer
3 years ago

@Opposablethumbs:

I thought the fans had worked out from the constellations that it was taking place in the distant future, after the Mediterranean shrinks again.

Mooncustafer
Mooncustafer
3 years ago

@GrumpyOldSocialJusticeMangina:

I learned some Boolean logic as a kid from a 1984 game called Rocky’s Boots, still available online if anyone’s interested.

DanHolme
DanHolme
3 years ago

@Arctic Ape

Also very cool, thank you.

I’m a big fan of the ‘Mortal Engines’ series of books, and I’ve always lived the first sentence:

‘It was a dark, blustery afternoon in spring, and the city of London was chasing a small mining town across the dried up bed of the old North Sea’. Municipal Darwinism requires another glacial period, it seems!

@WWTH

That crow’s cute! I think she’s just dancing.
Ducks, now, they’re shifty. They can walk AND fly AND swim – they’ve mastered three of the four elements. Should they become fireproof, they will be essentially unstoppable. Then we’ll all be quaking at the quacking!

EJ (Marxist Jazz Weasel)

If ducks become fireproof then we won’t be able to roast them, leading to a severe drop-off in the number of things in the world which are most delicious. This is an alarming possibility.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

A duck once told me I had beautiful eyes. I said “Waiter, I ordered aromatic duck”.

Ohlmann
Ohlmann
3 years ago

@EJ : fireproof isn’t heatproof. I don’t fear fireproofness.

Simon Hales
3 years ago

@Franscesca Torpedo

So I was figuring I might become an accountant, which sounds like a soul-crushing, draining job devoid of any creativity and is entirely at odds with my artistic inclinations. I get to write numbers and stare at screens, yaaaaaaaaay. 🙁

Who says that accounting can’t be creative? Some of the ways that accountants can help rich scum launder money and avoid tax are very creative indeed 🙂

opposablethumbs
opposablethumbs
3 years ago

@Mooncustafer, I probably misremembered then – I just remember that there was discussion of the date as calculated from the stars, which is so wonderfully “nice and accurate” (in the Agnes Nutter Good Omens sense 🙂 )

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ opposablethumbs

A quick internet search tells me Agnes Nutter is a fictional witch. I wonder if she was based on Alice Nutter (see memorial below). She was one of the women condemned in the Pendle Witch Trials.

comment image

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

Having scanned a synopsis of Good Omens (which I really want to read now) there does seem to be a coincidence of names which makes me think the Pendle Witches were the inspiration for some of the characters.

http://strangedaze.doomby.com/medias/images/list-5.jpg

msexceptiontotherule
msexceptiontotherule
3 years ago

Ducks aren’t terribly scary, but that may be my view after 10 years living in a home in a HOA community with no grass but hardscaping lakes and streams and what have you, so we’ve got a year round population of them. Geese – now they are terrible. Always with the honk-a-honking, in the wee hours of the morning and all darn day. We’ve had a couple pair try to establish our lakes and streams as home but luckily there are enough ducks willing to go all “sharks vs jets” on them so they haven’t built any nests…if they have goslings here at some point the battle will be lost and we’ll be stuck with geese, possibly with a mass exodus of most of our ducks. Duck change-of-address activity depends on whether the nearby college fills its lake again, it’s been drained and dry as part of some extensive earthquake retrofitting of the campus. SoCal seems to be an ideal year round place for ducks, provided that we continue to pretend droughts aren’t a thing so all of the man-made water features can remain full.

Yay for France saying NO to Le Pen the Facist. She seems too chummy with Putin anyway, and Putin is a bad bad man. Evil on the inside should have to show on the outside. (With Putin…it kind of does. Just look at pictures of him making ‘serious face’.)

DanHolme
DanHolme
3 years ago

@Alan Robertshaw

You’ll enjoy ‘Good Omens’.

“The ducks in St James’s Park are so used to being fed bread by secret agents meeting clandestinely that they have developed their own Pavlovian reaction. Put a St James’s Park duck in a laboratory cage and show it a picture of two men — one usually wearing a coat with a fur collar, the other something sombre with a scarf — and it’ll look up expectantly.”

(Not gonna lie – I’m quite pleased with myself for managing to combine Good Omens and ducks in one quote!)

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ dan

I’m quite pleased with myself for managing to combine Good Omens and ducks in one quote!

And apostrophe ‘S’s!

Agnes in Good Omens seems to also have features of Old Mother Shipton. For more details on her I’ll leave it to my favourite Philosopher, Philomena Cunk.

opposablethumbs
opposablethumbs
3 years ago

The parallels and names will be absolutely intentional, Allan – Good Omens being a Gaiman-Pratchett collaboration. And yes, I suspect you will love it (and may very possibly look askance and frankly wonder at your life to date, that it has not hitherto included the reading of this book. It is so far up your street that you probably live next door).

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ opposablethumbs

It is so far up your street that you probably live next door

I love that; it’s so Douglas Adamsesque.

I’ve breached my usual rule about only buying from small book shops and downloaded a copy though iBooks. I foolishly had a quick glance. Now I’m in ‘just one more page then must get back to work’ mode.

opposablethumbs
opposablethumbs
3 years ago

:-))))) and it just gets better (imo). Plus it kind of has hints of Just William here and there. So much to enjoy 🙂

I was once reading my copy in a public place, and someone asked me if it was something religious (obviously assuming my answer would be a demure affirmative. Well, with a title like Good Omens it sounds like something a JhWitness would read I suppose). They looked a bit shocked when I laughed rather loudly as I explained that no, it wasn’t.

EJ (Marxist Jazz Weasel)

Good Omens is very definitely a religious book. It’s basically fanfic of the Bible, and one can’t get more religious than that.

DanHolme
DanHolme
3 years ago

@EJ

But what kind of religion?
“…the quiet, personal kind, that involves doing good deeds and living a better life…”;
“…the kind that involves putting on a suit and ringing’ people’s doorbells…”;
or “the kind that involves having your own TV network and getting people to send you money.”

Oh, look! I’m using …herbs again, for extra potency!

!!!

Lenaxxx99
Lenaxxx99
3 years ago

Could you make a response to Lauren Southern “what all girls need to hear” Video? I don’t disagree with all she said but so feel like she is way to oversimplifying reality and cherry picks studies.

Rhuu
Rhuu
3 years ago

re: Khan academy – I would be down for updating people on our achievements! I do better when I have some sort of social support on things.

I’m into fractions, and I realised the best part about staring at grade 3! I did all of my math in French, which means that I don’t always know all the English terms for things.

Though I refuse to say ‘ten to the power of two’ when I could just say ‘ten to the two’ like a reasonable person. Why do I need two extra words? 😉

Also I don’t want to put commas between my numbers… I wonder if there’s a setting I can toggle that will let me do the questions in english, but write the answers in the french numerical style?

Dalillama: Irate Social Engineer

@Alan

A quick internet search tells me Agnes Nutter is a fictional witch. I wonder if she was based on Alice Nutter (see memorial below). She was one of the women condemned in the Pendle Witch Trials.

The short answer is yes. There’s a lot of those references in the Lanc[ashi]re Witches parts of Pratchett’s Discworld books as well.
@opposablethumbs

I was once reading my copy in a public place, and someone asked me if it was something religious (obviously assuming my answer would be a demure affirmative. Well, with a title like Good Omens it sounds like something a JhWitness would read I suppose). They looked a bit shocked when I laughed rather loudly as I explained that no, it wasn’t.

I’ve had a kind of inverse of that experience. Christopher Moore’s Lamb: The Gospel According to Christ’s Childhood Pal Biff comes in a special faux-leather bound edition made to look like a bible. I once saw someone reading this edition at an event, and commented that it was a very good book. They smirked and said it wasn’t what I thought, and I had to explain that it was exactly what I thought, I had the same edition at home.

@Rhuu

Though I refuse to say ‘ten to the power of two’ when I could just say ‘ten to the two’ like a reasonable person. Why do I need two extra words?

It’s also acceptable in English to say ‘ten to the second’ (or third, or whatever)

Robert Walker-Smith
Robert Walker-Smith
3 years ago

I read Moby Dick the first time when I was so young I thought it was about whaling.
Second time, decades later, I got a lot more out of it.

Still want to give War and Peace another try. I swear, there’s not a wasted word in that book.

Rhuu
Rhuu
3 years ago

@Dalillama: Thank you! Good to know.

dreemr
dreemr
3 years ago

Re: Moby Dick – when I finally read it (in my early 30s I think) I was mostly struck by how funny it was and what a sly sense of humor Melville had.

Francesca Torpedo, Femoid Special Forces Major
Francesca Torpedo, Femoid Special Forces Major
3 years ago

Re: Moby Dick

The passages about clam chowder always make me hungry for clam chowder.

PeeVee the (Timber-Rattling Booger Slut, But Noice) Sarcastic
PeeVee the (Timber-Rattling Booger Slut, But Noice) Sarcastic
3 years ago

Lamb is one of my favorite books of all time.

Amen.