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James Woods wants you to know how much he really, really hates Hillary Clinton

James Woods: Twitter creep

I always feel a little sad when I learn that some actor or actress I like turns out to have terrible politics. I’m still recovering from my recent discovery that Mike Nelson of MST3K fame is a right winger who loves the Washington Times and Michael Medved. Michael Freaking Medved!! Maybe he really should be shot into space to watch bad films for all eternity.

And then there’s James Woods, so good at playing creepy charmers, perhaps most memorably in David Cronenberg’s Videodrome. It’s one of my favorite films and he’s a big part of what makes it great (I mean, alongside Debbie Harry and a really weird TV set). But alas, in real life he’s a lot more creepy than charming, an obsessive right-wing Obama-hater (with a girlfriend more than forty years his junior) who spent years attacking the now-ex-President on Twitter.

Now, in the age of Trump, he’s moved on from Obama. For the most part.

But he can’t seem to let go of Hillary Clinton. Even today, nearly six months after she lost the election and 95 days into Trumps’ regime, Woods’ Twitter is filled with bizarre attacks on Hillary.

If you haven’t looked in on Woods’ Twitter before, you may be a bit surprised just how unhinged many of his political tweets are, rife with conspiratorial thinking (he was one of the #Pizzagate believers) and weird racist digs.

Here he is calling former Obama national security adviser Susan Rice a “savage” and demanding her arrest.

Meanwhile, his assorted tweets about Sen. Elizabeth Warren — or as he likes to call her, Princess Fauxcahontas — inevitably reference her American Indian blood in the crudest (and most hackneyed) possible ways.

It’s safe to say he hates Democrats generally.

He really, really doesn’t like abortion, or Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards.

And he has one of the most, er, creative takes on the whole O’Reilly thing I’ve seen.

He still throws in the occasional anti-Obama tweet, for old times sake.

And he’s got a lingering obsession with Susan Rice that is too tedious to even bother to document here.

But his greatest nemesis, at least for now, remains Hillary. Or, as he prefers to call her, The Hildebeest, or “Darth Vader in drag.”

Woods, who famously sued a Twitter user who called him a “cocaine addict,” frequently suggests, none-too-subtly, that Hillary is a raging alcoholic.

He even manages to work cat and rabbit gifs into his anti-Hillary fantasies.

Really, dude? You see a gif of a kitten bopping a baby bunny and the first thing you think is, “ha ha, that reminds me of Hillary Clinton, who by the way is a total drunk!”

If I may quote the famous Hollywood actor James Woods, “stop talking.”

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Kat, ambassador of the feminist government in exile
Kat, ambassador of the feminist government in exile
3 years ago

@Valentine
PS: I read somewhere once that everyone has these thoughts. Those who aren’t sensitive to them just dismiss them: Of course I wouldn’t do that!

Those who are sensitive to them worry about them and experience them as intrusive thoughts.

Makes sense to me.

Valentine
Valentine
3 years ago

@ Kat
Yes, i read the information now that the people here shared with me and now i found that it is common, first i felt bad because if everyone has it then what is wrong with me to experience distress? But then after i also felt good, like now i can stop to feel guilty for the bad thoughts.

Also thank you))) i like to do positive thinking as well. Mad Heads do a good version of dont worry be happy which I listen to a lot. Music is a big helper. I’m sure lots of people agree.

@Anisky

I am not american or english speaking, for first language but i think i am quite good. Not to sound arrogant! But i read and write okay, not so much speaking out loud but thats not important here anyway.

Before i go onto the other bit, when you say put me in a box, you mean in a mental installation? Or like in a way like a box being like a category?

But yeah it is complicated about the eyes. I want to say you are right about the second one, cos i know really it is not possible. How can there be a portal to someone’s mind from a poster or a photograph? And how can they make an opinion on me? I would say in the front part of my mind i 50% beleive it. But the other part, like the inside, the physical part i can feel pictures and eyes there like there is someone else in the room with me. You know how you start to act when you are not alone? Like maybe not put your finger in your nose 😁 or be more cooler and try to look good. I do this infront of the eyes. I cant stop myself treat them like they are also real. And if also i thought there were no eyes in a room and later find out there were i feel embarrassed and have to check back through my memory to make sure i did nothing bad.

To be honest i thought this was more normal than the thoughts. I shared this with my mother before when i was about 14. She said in some culture they beleive that the camera takes away the soul. So i thought maybe this is normal that i feel they are real people. Stupid because i mentioned to a doctor it once and he tried to give me medication. I put it in the bin. I was i think on 19 at the time. Maybe or 20.

I remind myself though it is not possible. But sometimes i like to have the eyes there. If i look good or say something charming to guests and the eyes see me then i feel proud. If i do something bad infront of them then i feel ashamed. Once recently, i took down the posters so my girlfriend can move my things when we moved apartment, and i still behave like the eyes can see me then remember they are not watching me. This way i know it is like a bad habits.

So to conclude. Maybe i woulf say 50% beleive and 50% know it is not possible.

Also now i would just say i hope i didnt violate the policy too because i said i was crazy. I didnt mean to upset anyone reading.

Hambeast, disorderly she-tornado and breaker of windows
Hambeast, disorderly she-tornado and breaker of windows
3 years ago

WARNING TMI AHEAD! You have been warned.

Valentine – As a child, I used to think the universe was speaking to me. My real name begins with “S” and I saw “signs” (“S” shapes) everywhere. I figured out later (around 13-14) that pretty much anything long and wiggly will land in an “S” shape more often than not if you just drop it. Finding that out was actually a relief because I never did figure out what the universe was saying!

My mild OCD takes the form of me endlessly re-hashing unpleasant situations in my head. I’ll ‘rewrite’ them and replay them mentally for hours, usually at bedtime, as if doing this will retroactively change things for the better, even though I know that’s not possible. This started in my teens and almost immediately I began to (unconsciously) soothe myself out of it by either squeezing blackheads, or later, plucking my eyebrows. These things worked, but left me with scars and nearly nonexistent brows!

During my Research Psychology phase, I decided that my behaviors were mild OCD and looked into behavioral therapy techniques (this was back in the 90s) and decided to try replacing my objectionable behaviors with something else so I started plucking hairs on my legs instead. This has really worked for me, since wrecking my face caused me a bunch of anxiety and now almost all of the hair on my legs is silky and blonde instead of dark and coarse. I feel that giving myself permission to do a non-harmful, yet compulsive thing broke the obsessive part of my OCD.

I could very well be wrong about this since I never got past Psych 100, so consult a professional if you can!

Have you ever heard the English phrase “it soothes my soul”? That’s what plucking my legs does for me, even though I seldom do it anymore.

Anisky
Anisky
3 years ago

@Valentine

Oh, box as in category, no question!! Sorry for the confusion. I’m not sure how it is in other countries, but in America, pretty much the only reason someone can be institutionalized against their will is if healthcare professionals believe they’re a danger to themselves or others. Unless mental health care in your home country is really backwards, no way something like believing photographs can see or hear you would qualify.

While I never had it to the degree you’re talking about, what you say about those sensations and behaviors definitely rings some bells in my mind. I remember that when I was a pre-teen/young teen, I had this thing where if I wasn’t dressed in my room, I had to hide it from my mirror. I don’t remember the details of why, but I do know that it wasn’t only because I didn’t want to see my naked body. It was that being naked in front of my mirror would expose me to someone who wasn’t me, and it sounds like very much the same sort of part-feeling, part-belief you describe. It was strong enough that I hid my nakedness from my mirror for at least a year, and even knowing intellectually that it didn’t make sense, I couldn’t stop myself from behaving that way anyway.

(I think, also in my early teens, I had the same sensation/partial-belief that my thoughts weren’t safe in my own head, and other people could see them. I forced myself to stop trains of thought in their tracks and would even start going “LALALALA” in my head really loudly if I started to think about things I wanted private.)

So, I do think that I understand, at least to some degree, what you mean. My guess is that it, also, is something many people experience, just not to the same degree.

I’m curious– you seem to be very against going on medication. Is there a reason, besides your job? While treating one’s issues through evidence-based therapy is a very valid, and in many cases can ultimately yield similar results to medication without having to take pills for the rest of one’s life, there are also some psychiatric conditions where medication really helps in a way therapy can’t. My college girlfriend had been diagnosed with schizophrenia in high school, but she was lucky in that she responded extremely well to anti-psychotics. Once every couple of years she may have an episode that requires brief hospitalization, but it doesn’t interfere with her life any more than occasionally getting a stomach bug would. She graduated on time, is at an extremely prestigious grad school, and is living a normal, happy life, that would probably not have been possible without medication.

Please don’t get me wrong, I am absolutely not saying that you’re schizophrenic, and I’m not saying that medication is necessary in your case– I don’t know nearly enough either about you or psychology to be able to even make the merest guess about that. I’m just curious why you’re so dead set against medication.

Somewhat in line with what Kat was saying about “don’t worry, be happy” and not to overthink things, there are some places where it seemed to me that you were being way too hard on yourself. For example,

If i am alone and i get a bad thought then i speak to myself. But i know this is not correct.

I don’t see anything wrong with speaking to yourself while you’re alone. Why do you say that it is “not correct”? I don’t think it’s that unusual to talk to yourself when nobody is around. But even if it is, I don’t see why it would matter. I mean, obviously it’s not a great thing if you’re saying awful, terrible things to yourself, but even that doesn’t seem to me significantly worse than *thinking* awful, terrible things about yourself. Anything that doesn’t hurt anyone isn’t by itself, independently “incorrect” or “bad”– the problem is that it upsets and distresses you. Chastising yourself for behavior that makes you (and only you) feel bad… that does no good.

As my Jewish-Buddhist mother likes to say… be kind to yourself.

Again, I am a complete layperson, so take this with a grain of salt, and if there’s some problem that I don’t see, I beg other posters to correct me quickly.

As far as the policy, I’m not a regular poster so I don’t have a strong sense of the subtleties of the ableism policy. But it’s obvious that you are sincerely looking for help/advice, and that you weren’t intending to belittle anyone else by using the word “crazy”. While it may have broken the policy, in my experience the people here are very kind, so I don’t think they’re going to yell at you for putting yourself down while you were asking for help.

Er… sorry for the teal dear. I don’t even know if I should post this, but I spent this long typing it, so… I hope I didn’t say anything here to make people hate me.

Hambeast, disorderly she-tornado and breaker of windows
Hambeast, disorderly she-tornado and breaker of windows
3 years ago

Anisky – I’ve seen people here refer to themselves as crazy and it doesn’t seem to raise any hackles. Others refer to their own mental illness as “jerk brain” which I personally like.

Policy of Madness
Policy of Madness
3 years ago

re: the ableism policy

The purpose of the ableism policy with respect to “crazy” and “insane” and the like is to keep from conflating mental illness with simple assholishness. Doing so is harmful to people with mental illnesses, and it gives assholes an easy “out” – if they are crazy then they aren’t really responsible for their actions.

Related, we also don’t want people to diagnose others with mental illness or speculate about what mental illnesses someone might have when the only symptom is that the person is an asshole, or is using bad logic, or is a violent individual. This is also harmful to people with mental illnesses by implying that people with mental illnesses are violent assholes who can’t reason.

It’s not to ban the words themselves. I will refer to myself as crazy or mad (although madness is a political identity and not just a description of someone with a mental illness) and that’s okay, because I am actually literally mad.

Basically, don’t use “crazy” as a metaphor. It’s okay to use it when it’s literally true, especially if you are using it to refer to your own mental illnesses. The purpose of the policy is to avoid splash damage, not to police words out of the lexicon.

Valentine
Valentine
3 years ago

@Hambeast

Yes i ve heard this phrase before. I’m not sure if i should start to pull out my hairs though, i have a lot! 😁 i also dont know if i have an activity i can do because I’m not sure what i do is normal and what is not normal. I think it isnt good to hit myself but maybe okay to use my nails in my arm? It doesnt make it bleed or anything and i can do it in social situations without people noticing. But i would need someone to tell me which a can and cannot do and i probably would need a bit of time to go through the things.

But it makes me hopeful that you managed to find ways to do things that are simple and helpful and also dont hurt you.

Maybe the universe was saying you were S for specail ))))

@Alinsky

I dont know what i have to do in my country to get put in a real box but i am not interested to find out! But im glad you say they wont do anything if i share that.

The mirror thing sounds a bit like the eyes to me. I always dress somewhere there is no eyes, theres no eyes in my bedroom so no one can see me and my girlfriend when we make love. Also no eyes in my kitchen. I know the places i cannot be seen. Seems like your mind new you were silly but your body still felt the feelings of fear, like i do.

But it becomes more complicated and i dont want or know how to say it here, but bez any eyes anywhere i get another sensation which i suposed is maybe loneliness or something, which i actually need the eyes to protect me from. I cannot express it here well enough and even thought i know this is anonymous i dont think i should share too much.

But for medication it is simply my job i will lose if i take it. And i cannot possibly lose this job, because i will not find anything that will pay as well in my home country. Not for someone of my age. And also if people would find out i was on medication they would ask why and what for and i would have even more trouble finding a job. A therapist i can hide better than medication.

I feel a lot of things i do are not correct. I wake my girlfriend up when i need to make a sound or noise to make the bad thoughts go away at night. Like i said up above to Hambeast i think i need to make a list and then have somone to tell me what is and isnt correct.

@Policy of Madness

Thank you for explaining. It makes it a lot clearer to me now )))) so its okay if i say i feel crazy. Cos i do! 🙈

GrumpyOld SocialJusticeMangina
GrumpyOld SocialJusticeMangina
3 years ago

One of the great successes of the anti-Hillary propaganda campaign was to convince moderates that she was a flaming liberal and at the same time convince progressives that she was not a liberal at all. In many ways she had an almost impossible line to walk as a woman — one one hand she needed to prove that she was “tough” enough to be commander-in-chief, but that led to Berniebros claiming that “she never met a war she didn’t like” — which was kind of ironic, since she was an anti-war activist as a college student.

I can’t help but feel that a lot of the success of the anti-Hillary campaign came from the fact that a lot of men — and probably more than a few women — wanted an excuse to vote against her because they weren’t comfortable with a strong woman, but knew it was unfashionable to admit it. Woods is just a bit of the same thing taken to a delusional extreme.

Policy of Madness
Policy of Madness
3 years ago

@Valentine

If what you mean is that you feel like you might have a mental illness, then yes, that’s fine per the policy.

Hambeast, disorderly she-tornado and breaker of windows
Hambeast, disorderly she-tornado and breaker of windows
3 years ago

Valentine, an old behavoiral therapy trick is to wear a rubber band around your wrist and snap it when you have intrusive thoughts. Lots of smokers have used this when they craved a cigarette. If digging your nails into your arm doesn’t leave marks or cause bleeding, this works too.

A therapist who uses hypnosis might be able to help you to replace your nail-digging with a more discreet method, like a finger-tap to your wrist.

The drawback to my plucking habit is that it won’t always work in the moment; I can’t plop myself down and whip out my tweezers when I’m not home! Also, my eyesight’s not what it used to be and I need really good light nowadays.

I’ve never felt crazy, just occasionally bothered by intrusive thoughts that disrupt my sleep. Although when I was a child, the lights from passing cars in my room at night when the lights were off really bothered me and I still close my eyes when I hear passing cars in a darkened room at night!

Valentine
Valentine
3 years ago

@Hambeast

I have heared about the rubber band for self harm before but i am afraid it is too obvious and also that other people know what it means. The thing is i often get the thoughts on the bridge when talking to the captain, i can put my nails in my arm behind my back quietly but a band snap will be too loud. But also because of your hair plucking idea i had a funny image of just sitting down 🙈 in the middle of everything and starting to pluck 😁 now that would definitely make a difference!!

Right now i have 4 months until i can start to organise anything because i am not home.

Scifimaster92
Scifimaster92
3 years ago

It does not surprise me at all that Mike Nelson is a fan of the Medved brothers, considering his approach to film criticism is pretty much the same as that of the Medveds – tarring-and-feathering cult classics with actual fan followings in an incredibly mean-spirited manner and refusing to consider the possibility that anyone could possibly enjoy these films in any way.

As for the guy who accused James Woods of being a druggie, he may have a point. The actor’s toxic behaviour is pretty consistent with that of a coke addict. Especially with regards to his unprovoked anger, violence, and defensiveness.

Steven Dutch
Steven Dutch
3 years ago

The canard that the Democrats used to be the party of the KKK is true, but utterly irrelevant to today. It’s like boycotting IKEA because the Vikings killed your great times fifty grandfather.

Still, I have to say the Then/Now picture comparing the KKK to modern hoods in hoodies couldn’t happen to a more deserving crowd of – hoods.

Interestingly, a lot of places have laws banning masked demonstrations passed specifically to thwart groups like the Klan.

Mattie
Mattie
3 years ago

If a whole bunch of us called James Woods a cocaine addict on Twitter, would he sue everyone? Or could he not sue us all?