Categories
alpha males antifeminism mansplaining men who should not ever be with women ever narcissism

The shirtless violin dude from the “I won’t date hot women” piece has a blog! And it sucks

Benedict Beckeld would apparently prefer to date himself

If you read that “Why I won’t date hot women anymore” article from the New York Post that I gently parodied in my post yesterday, you no doubt remember Benedict Beckeld.

Sure, the name itself might not immediately ring a bell, but you will almost certainly remember his picture: He’s the muscular fellow who posed, sans shirt, while playing or pretending to play a violin.

Beckeld is also the guy who complained to the author of the article that “people who are better looking are less likely to pursue advanced degrees, or play an instrument or learn other languages.” Beckeld, who clearly sees himself as really, really, ridiculously good looking, went on to point out that he in fact has an advanced degree, can play the violin, and can speak seven languages. (Allegedly.)

Well, it turns out he has opinions about things other than hot people and their alleged unwillingness to learn stuff. Indeed, the late-thirties Brooklyn “writer” and self-publisher has a “philosophical blog” through which he attempts to force these ideas upon what one imagines, for him, has been a very unwelcoming world.

He’s a thoroughgoing reactionary clearly convinced that his ideas are far more original and interesting than they really are, and most of his essays are pretty much unreadable philosophical dreck. (Trust me, I tried to read a bunch of them.)

The only one I managed to make it all the way through was his latest one, a rambling post on the now-famous “Fearless Girl” statue that now stands athwart the famous Wall Street bull statue in Manhattan’s Financial District. Needless to say, he’s not a fan of Fearless.

After declaring in an aside that “the girl’s fearlessness stems mainly from stupidity, since not even a grown man would stand a chance against a rampaging bull,” Beckeld goes on to set forth his main thesis: that Fearless represents the ungrateful and “oikophobic” ideology of modern feminism.

“Oikophobia,” in case you’re wondering, means hatred of home; Becheld is using it to mean “the dislike of one’s own civilization and a disregard of the traditions that shaped it.” Beckeld is completely obsessed with this idea and is apparently writing a book on the subject, because why not?

Anyhoo, here’s what he’s got to say about little Fearless.

Fearless Girl is a stab not only at testosterone-laden executive boardrooms (though Fearless Girl is as much a corporate stunt as anything, whereas Charging Bull was the work of an independent artist), but also an oikophobic attack at the United States.

Oikophobic!

Wall Street no doubt has its excesses, but it also contributes enormously to its city’s and country’s financial success, and thereby to so much of the wealth that we all take for granted here, and which we criticize and consider insignificant precisely because we have come to take it for granted.

Later on in the essay, he accuses feminist types of being, basically, overgrown children. But of course he doesn’t put it quite so succinctly. Wall of text, incoming!

A part of attacking the ruling power is now the prejudice that, no matter what, one should never change for others and that one is fine just the way one is. This is why it is also significant that the statue does not simply portray a female, but specifically a young girl rather than a woman. For the dissemination of the aforementioned anti-patriarchal prejudice is a reflection not only of people having become more narcissistic, but also of the increased purchasing power of young people. This prejudice – that no matter what one does or how one behaves, one should stay the way one is – happens to be expressive of a particularly youthful and infantile attitude, and since young people have more money than they used to, or at least a greater access to their parents’ money than they used to, the popular culture is going to change in order to cater to their emotional needs, and so more films will be made, more songs produced, where this prejudice is expressed. Many of these young people will learn over time that it is in fact healthy to change in some respects every now and then, and that some bases of power – such as American power – are better left untouched, although there is, of course, a feedback loop in which the increased stress on this prejudice in popular culture will also, regrettably, come to influence those who might otherwise not have been victims of it. The girl of the statue has the knowledge and understanding of a child, but the conviction of a prophet, and therefore taps perfectly into the self-righteousness of the millennial generation (who feel intellectually flattered and therefore love the statue).

But of course he blames the millennials!

The statue – and the politicians who support its presence – thus, opportunistically, dips into that faux-feminism of the young and the angry, who know what they hate but not what they love, and who in any case refuse to understand what they owe to the object of their wrath.

You ungrateful kids! GET OFF OF MY LAWN!

Beckeld has many similarly not-very-mindblowing thoughts on subjects ranging from the election, America’s alleged decadence, and the problems he’s got with contemporary feminism. I would pull out some amusing quotes, but, well, his blog posts are far more tedious than amusing. So instead I’ll go take a nap.

If unlike me you love every second you spend readng Beckeld’s blog posts you can sample more of his writing in his two English-language books. One, called Art & Aesthetics, is apparently about, well, art and aesthetics. The other, a self-published volume with the somewhat prosaic title Statements, offers, according to the author,

two parts I wrote when I was 17 and 19 years old, respectively. It deals mainly with issues of ethics, aesthetics, and the philosophy of history. It also contains my first critique of academia.

So that sounds like an absolute delight, huh?

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

108 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Nequam
Nequam
3 years ago

@moggie

I look at that paragraph and all I see is

comment image

Rhuu
Rhuu
3 years ago

Oh yeah, Millennials have it so easy. I mean, lets just buy all the houses!

Assuming you made over 100k in August 2016.

And since that article was from so long ago, it no longer applies. House prices have jumped 33% in the GTA this year.

And spring is coming

People still ask me “why are you renting when you could buy?”

A) fuck you very much for asking.

B) have you not SEEN the house prices??? The little detached house in the second article will probably go for two million dollars, once the price war is done.

If houses were as cheap as they were when the boomer generation was buying, i would buy three. But they aren’t, and i will never own one, because who can? We’re basically making landed gentry here, and it sucks.

Oh, also, better hope your rental is older than 1991 because if it isn’t fuck you.

There was a theory that this would spur more housing being built, and competition would keep the prices reasonable. But since anyone with a hint of sense could see that theory is stupid, it obviously didn’t happen. I mean, it’s just a COINCIDENCE that gas prices are always the same, right? Or that they’ll go up before a long weekend? The free market works for all of us, dammit! /s

… Teel dear about people applying the way things worked when they were young and white middle class and could support a family on one income. That isn’t true for people who are still white and middle class, much less for the rest of society. Argh.

dr. ej
dr. ej
3 years ago

The other, a self-published volume with the somewhat prosaic title Statements, offers, according to the author,

The ad break after this sentence made it look like the book was offering me a free smart phone, which sounds better than the actual description of the book. It just sounds pretentious.

@Moggie
I don’t insist that people call me doctor (except here where I use it to distinguish myself from the other EJ). I do enjoy it when people call me doctor, but I’ve had my PhD for less than six months so the novelty of it hasn’t worn off yet.

EJ (Marxist Jazz Weasel)

@Moggie:

I know a married couple with PhDs who insist on being called Dr and Dr Davenport. Does that count?

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ Doctor ej

I don’t insist that people call me doctor

I’ve mentioned before my bedazzled admiration for people who have the wherewithal to work for PhDs; so as far as I’m concerned you should all have special tattoos and heralds announcing your presence.

dr. ej
dr. ej
3 years ago

@Alan

Well, I did get a science tattoo to celebrate getting my PhD…

Moggie
Moggie
3 years ago

Non-Dr EJ:

I know a married couple with PhDs who insist on being called Dr and Dr Davenport. Does that count?

“Pass the salt, dear”
“Ahem…”
“Sorry! Pass the salt, Dr dear.”
“Here you are, honey.”
“Ahem…”

Perhaps my opinion is coloured by working in a university. If everyone in the place insisted on the correct honorifics at all times, it’d get ridiculous.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ Doctor ej

In Asimov’s “Lucky Starr” series, members of the ‘Council of Science’ have special thought activated tattoos that they use as ID.

That is soooo cool though.

I do now though have an image of a drunken session in a tattoo parlour resulting in some sailor wondering why he has a science tattoo and your mates asking you when you served on the Nimitz.

Moggie
Moggie
3 years ago

dr. ej:

Well, I did get a science tattoo to celebrate getting my PhD…

Well, you earned it.

Dormousing_it
Dormousing_it
3 years ago

It seems, every emerging generation takes heat from the mainstream media.

Millenials: For whatever it’s worth, you have my sympathy. I certainly wouldn’t want to be young, and trying to establish myself, in the Cheeto era.

I remember the garbage the media spouted about my generation: Generation X. We were slackers, we were latchkey kids. Slackers! I graduated college during the early 90s recession. I made do, for awhile, with two part-time, low-paid, customers service jobs. I was all of 23 years old… I didn’t tank the economy!

Supposedly, MTV had decimated our attention spans. Ridiculously, we were supposed to have this fetish for the 70s TV show, The Brady Bunch. (I’m talking USasians here, of course.). All, completely unrelatable to me.

We didn’t even get a proper name; we got a letter: X. It seems we’re defined by what we’re not: We’re not Baby Boomers, and we’re not Millenials. Oh, well. And, we’re a small generation, in terms of numbers.

EJ (Marxist Jazz Weasel)

Perhaps my opinion is coloured by working in a university. If everyone in the place insisted on the correct honorifics at all times, it’d get ridiculous.

Academia is a strange place, isn’t it? It’s really easy to forget that in the real world, a PhD is considered a serious achievement.

Lea
Lea
3 years ago

He is a white male supremacist who thinks he is much cleverer and more interesting than he is?
Of course.
I can’t wait for the women who were unfortunate enough to date him start coming forward to tell about what a dull date he was and how tedious dinner with him was.

dr. ej
dr. ej
3 years ago

@Alan

That sailor would have a hard time explaining that tattoo. It’s not a common or easily recognized image.

comment image

This is photograph 51, Rosalind Franklin’s x-ray crystallographic image of DNA. I have it tattooed just above my ankle and I love it. It’s fitting because my PhD did involve a lot of DNA work, but it also commemorates an underappreciated woman in science. So not only do I have a science tattoo, it also has some feminist undertones too.

I think I’ve shared this here before, but it explains a lot about Rosalind Franklin’s story and why so few people know about her and her work.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZUun93_V18

@Moggie

I can confirm that is true. Thankfully, I only had to fight a small, slightly venomous snake.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ Dr EJ

That tattoo is just cool on so many levels. I’m mildly smug that I did actually recognise the photo. I did once toy with submitting an article to Cracked along the lines of “Five photographs that revolutionised science”. But ignoramus that I am I could only think of that one and the eclipse photo that proved relativity. Until they prove the Loch Ness Monster is real I don’t think the ‘Surgeons photo’ counts.

it also commemorates an underappreciated woman in science.

It’s a fine line between underappreciated and thoroughly ripped off. Still, if women scientists didn’t want guys stealing their work they should have used drawers with better locks.

One of my favourite ‘unsung women’ facts is that Barbara Cartland (the fluffy pink romance novelist) designed the troop carrying gliders used on D-Day.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

Barbara about to undertake the world’s first long range towed glider flight. This was the proof of concept that gliders could be used as transports.

http://i.imgur.com/YlZPIeK.jpg

dr. ej
dr. ej
3 years ago

@Alan

It’s a fine line between underappreciated and thoroughly ripped off.

True. You could definitely claim that the work was stolen. Watson and Crick downplayed her contribution in the acknowledgements of their paper, even though she had written her paper first. They were published in the same issue of Nature, but Watson and Crick’s came first, making it seem like hers was supporting and confirming their work, when it was really the other way around. She had actual data and molecular measurements; they had a model built off of her data.

(All the papers are archived here: http://www.nature.com/nature/dna50/archive.html)

It would have also helped a lot if James Watson were not a sexist, self-centered asshat. Seriously, in one of his books, he boasts about how he used data from Franklin and Wilkins without them knowing. He may be a brilliant scientist, but everything I’ve heard about him is that he’s probably pretty unpleasant to be around.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ Dr EJ

You could definitely claim that the work was stolen.

I’m reasonably convinced that it wasn’t just plagiarism but an actual physical theft was involved. I know there’s now a question as to who handed over the papers and whether Rosalind owned the copyright or if it belonged to the uni. The fact is though that it’s now only the alleged perpetrators able to give an account. But that’s like me coming back from a camping trip and claiming the rest of the party simply insisted that I eat them.

Ellesar
Ellesar
3 years ago

Quite a stretch to claim that Fearless Girl is unAmerican! Since when is Wall St the seat of American Patriotism?

Business people of the Wall St type tend not to have national allegiances when it comes to making money. If more money can be made in Tokyo, Hong Kong or London they won’t hesitate in upping sticks.

You would think that such a clever man would know that!

dr. ej
dr. ej
3 years ago

@Alan

I’m reasonably convinced that it wasn’t just plagiarism but an actual physical theft was involved.

That is entirely possible. Wilkins was in regular contact with Watson and Crick. He showed Watson the photo, but how Wilkins managed to get his hands on it is up for debate.

Redsilkphoenix: Jetpack Vixen, Agent of the FemiNest Collective; Keeper of a Hell Toupee, and all-around Intergalactic Meanie
Redsilkphoenix: Jetpack Vixen, Agent of the FemiNest Collective; Keeper of a Hell Toupee, and all-around Intergalactic Meanie
3 years ago

@Rhuu,

Eeep!!! Glad I don’t live in Toronto if that’s what the prices are like there. O.o

Unfortunately that attitude of ‘if I could afford [things] back when I was your age, you can afford [more things] now!’ isn’t a new one. Back in the late 1990’s my parents decided to dump a house mortgage on me when I was thirty because (as near as I can figure out their thinking on the matter*) ‘it was time for me to grow up, move out of their house, and learn to manage money. The end.’

….

…let’s just say it didn’t work out the way they assumed it would. And that the financial lessons that experience taught me are still bugging my life now, and need to be unlearned.

*At no point in the discussions about me buying this house was I ever asked about any part it. No-one asked to see my paychecks to see if I could afford it, no-one asked what my long-term plans were or what my debt load was, to see if living at home was actually a better deal for me at that time. So I can only guess at what they were thinking based on off-hand comments about the matter.

Bleah.

bekabot
bekabot
3 years ago

Beckeld, who clearly sees himself as really, really, ridiculously good looking

…so of course he won’t date hot women. He wants to be The Pretty One — that explains itself. (Weiningerian haverings-on = unnecessary.)

History Nerd
History Nerd
3 years ago

Complaining about “millennials” is victim blaming. It’s supposedly your own fault that you came of age when it’s harder to find a job. Further, younger people have always tended to have less money, so that also must be Their Fault ™.

Rhuu
Rhuu
3 years ago

@Redsilkphoenix: i’m so sorry to hear that! Sometimes people just need to *listen*.

The government is supposed to be trying to find ways to cool this market. We’ll see if they actually can!

Ooglyboggles
3 years ago

@Redsilkphoenix: Jetpack Vixen, Agent of the FemiNest Collective; Keeper of a Hell Toupee, and all-around Intergalactic Meanie
/hugs No parent should shackle their kids with financial burdens like that.

Dalillama: Irate Social Engineer

@Rhuu

The government is supposed to be trying to find ways to cool this market. We’ll see if they actually can!

Can? Certainly. The government (wait, do you mean the city government or the provincial /federal? Affects what specifically they could do) absolutely could do something about housing prices. They almost certainly won’t, though.

Guest
Guest
3 years ago

OK, I still can’t get over how appalling shirtless violin guy is. In the interview someone posted above he says this:

‘my literary agent is currently shopping around a memoir I wrote about my time as a volunteer teacher in Namibia. I lived in a small village with the Herero tribe in the Kalahari Desert, close to the border with Botswana, and it is, if I may say so, quite an unusual and in some ways tragic story.’

Maybe not as bad as his teenage indictment of academia, but probably close. I wonder if his literary agent is familiar with this:

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/jul/05/zambians-hit-back-at-white-saviour-gap-yah-memoir

I served in Malawi with a friend who would have had such a laugh out of this; she died about a year and a half ago so we were unable to share our scorn.

Banananana dakry: Fat, Short-Haired, and Deranged
Banananana dakry: Fat, Short-Haired, and Deranged
3 years ago

@Dormousing_it

Yeah, I remember all the crap they spewed about us back when, and this is exactly why my teeth grind when they bag on the millennials(probably sic) these days. We were shallow, slackers, no attention span, blah blah blah… Guess which generation is being called that now? Second verse, same as the first. With the added fun of even more assholes stomping on your fingers and laughing at you while you’re trying to pull yourself up than twenty years before. I don’t envy them their position, any more than I did that of Generation X.

Frankly, I’m so over it, because it’s the same divide and conquer shit as before. My hopes are with the millennials, because having been on the receiving end of this trickle-down horsecrap they know damn well it doesn’t work, and an irritated, socially conscious voting bloc is not something you want to annoy any more than necessary,

Axecalibur: Middle Name Danger
Axecalibur: Middle Name Danger
3 years ago

Art & Aesthetics

Statements

Why this sound like somebody’s soundcloud mixtape archive?

dr. ej
dr. ej
3 years ago

@Alan

Update! I actually had to defend Rosalind Franklin at dinner today.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ Dr EJ

I’m envisaging some sort of rear spinning scissor kick so you actually took them out with your tattoo for extra irony points.

But if it was something more academic I’m still intrigued. Who was dissing her?

Bina
3 years ago

@Dormousing_it:

I remember the garbage the media spouted about my generation: Generation X. We were slackers, we were latchkey kids. Slackers! I graduated college during the early 90s recession. I made do, for awhile, with two part-time, low-paid, customers service jobs. I was all of 23 years old… I didn’t tank the economy!

Supposedly, MTV had decimated our attention spans. Ridiculously, we were supposed to have this fetish for the 70s TV show, The Brady Bunch. (I’m talking USasians here, of course.). All, completely unrelatable to me.

We didn’t even get a proper name; we got a letter: X. It seems we’re defined by what we’re not: We’re not Baby Boomers, and we’re not Millenials. Oh, well. And, we’re a small generation, in terms of numbers.

Not only that, but we’re now the leaders of the anti-Drumpf resistance movement.

And here in Canada, we also formed the bulk of the movements to abolish all anti-abortion laws (we haven’t had one since 1988, when I protested against the last one while still in university!) and to legalize same-sex marriage (which has been legal across the country since 2005). We’re also staunch environmentalists and anti-poverty activists. And we cut our teeth on all this during the Mulroney Recession…

“Slacker” THAT, all you “Me Generation” boomeryuppies.

Banananana dakry: Fat, Short-Haired, and Deranged
Banananana dakry: Fat, Short-Haired, and Deranged
3 years ago

@Bina

Would that we had more of that movement south of the border here. Unfortunately too much of the USA’s population still has a horrible case of rectocranial inversion. We’re trying though!

As for the ‘slacker’ thing, my take is if you know the workplace game is rigged against you, why destroy yourself body and soul for the benefit of someone who doesn’t give a shit about you? And the powers that be wonder why the morale of the most recent two generations is in general so goddamn low…

Kootiepatra
3 years ago

Egads. I wrote some pretentious nonsense when I was 17 and 19, too, but I did not turn around as an adult and decide the world needed to read it.

Playonwords
Playonwords
3 years ago

Shirtless violin man has never heard of Minoan bull dancers

Rhuu
Rhuu
3 years ago

@Dalillama: according to this cbc article, it’s going to be all three levels of government.

I didn’t see a fixed date though. The government (not sure which level) did take action in Vancouver though, which apparently helped.

@dr. ej: thank you for the youtube link! I will watch that when i’m not on mobile.

dr. ej
dr. ej
3 years ago

@Alan

My uncle. He claimed that Watson and Crick published first, even though Franklin had a paper published in the same issue of the journal. They used her data to build their model and didn’t give her credit. I couldn’t let that comment slide. One of the other dinner guests was interested in the controversy because he hadn’t heard about it. He was going to do some research so at least he will learn about her.

Unfortunately there were no scissor kicks. It didn’t seem appropriate at my grandparent’s house.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ Dr EJ

One of the other dinner guests was interested in the controversy because he hadn’t heard about it.

I’m not surprised. I’m quite into sciency things but even I grew up on the story that it was Watson and Crick inspired by a spiral staircase.

But science is full of cosy but untrue narratives. It’s like no disrespect to the famous heroes and heroines of Bletchley Park; but we never hear about the Poles or Tommy Flowers or (my favourite) the unsung MI6 peeps who realised Enigma machines were a commercial product so just bought one from the manufacturers.

But women face a special erasure. How many people remember that “Von Claueswitz’s” On War was actually put together by his Mrs. Or Sister Rosetta Tharpe invented rock and roll. Or Wing Chun (the kung-fu founder) was a nun?

In science it’s like women are allowed Madame Curie and maybe as a bonus Hedy Lamar, but that’s your lot.

Pie
Pie
3 years ago

Bit late to this particular thread, but did you know that the guy who made the angry bull sculpture is quite unhappy about the girl standing up to it?

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/apr/12/charging-bull-new-york-fearless-girl-statue-copyright-claim

I somehow can’t find any sympathy for him.

Moggie
Moggie
3 years ago

I can understand why Di Modica is unhappy, but not sympathise. As an artist, you don’t get to dictate how your art is perceived (this is equally true for the Fearless Girl statue, which is not without its critics). You particularly don’t get to insist that your vision must go unchallenged for decades, especially when your art is in a public place. The bull was installed in 1989. The world, including Wall Street, has changed since then, and perhaps more people are ready for a challenge to his ugly, aggressive, fuck-you celebration of capitalism? Not that that’s how Fearless Girl was intended, but, like I said, what the artist meant is not the last word.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ moggie

Under international copyright law artists do have some, limited, ‘moral rights’. Those include not having your work ‘modified’ without your consent.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visual_Artists_Rights_Act

But he does seem to be being a bit of a dick about it and, as you say, amending or changing artworks to produce a new interpretation is in itself all part of artistic endeavour.

Rhuu
Rhuu
3 years ago

@Alan: i was wondering about moral rights! I hear it’s a commonwealth thing, and not actually something in American law. I was wondering if an artist, someone who apparently installed the statue with no permissions or permits, has any. He’s not american, but the statue is in the states, and was probably produced there so…?

It makes me think of the ribbons on the geese of eatons centre, and how the artist successfully used his moral rights to get them removed.

I’ve also heard of Canadian film editors preventing a film from being recut without their permission. If only the editor on the original star wars had moral rights!

Every contract i’ve ever signed has made me sign away mine. I always check.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ rhuu

Every contract i’ve ever signed has made me sign away mine. I always check.

Ooh, where are you based? In the EU moral rights are the one thing that can’t be sold or assigned. They’re inherent to the artist (of course, it can get complicated).

As for Mr Bull-Statue, hasn’t he brought a claim? Be interesting to see how it’s argued if it gets to court.

Moggie
Moggie
3 years ago

I can see how castrating the bull, or placing it inside a giant sesame seed bun, could be said to be an unfair modification. But placing another statue some metres away? If he’s able to block that, that’s a bad law, in my opinion. It would be interesting to know how distant the other statue must be before a court will reject his argument.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ moggie

or placing it inside a giant sesame seed bun

You are not helping my struggle with vegetarianism.

But to your main point, it would be hard to argue I think that fearless girl wasn’t intended to modify the meaning of the Bull by being an integral part of the full display. The message only makes sense if the statues relate to each other in physical space, regardless of distance.

Although counter to that is merely placing something next to a work a modification that falls within the definition of the Act? Let’s say Da Vinci still had copyright in the Mona Lisa. Could he object to an exhibition that featured the original but also a gallery full of derivative works?

Hmm, it’s an interesting topic. Heh, whilst I still think he’s being a bit full of himself I’m now curious about what would happen if he does go ahead with a lawsuit.

Croquembouche of patriarchy
Croquembouche of patriarchy
3 years ago

It may already have appeared on WHTM, but this article sums up 3/4 of how I feel about the Fearless Girl’s insertion into, and subversion of, Di Modica’s creation:
https://gregfallis.com/2017/04/14/seriously-the-guy-has-a-point/

Another 1/8 of how I feel about it is that I’m ticked off this advertorial designed to hit us in our feels is a child, not a woman; a potential, not an actuality. Wall St is full of adult women who could use a little recognition themselves. I hope they feel positive about this addition.

The final 1/8: Di Modica’s work was unsolicited, and remains his to control. The place it is in, is not. If he doesn’t like the way his bull has been reframed by the addition of the girl, he can vote with his four hooves and remove the bull altogether, place him beside the girl in alliance, add a grown woman riding on his back facing down a bear, whatever flight of creation he likes – and hope that once again his vision will be embraced by other people.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

@ croquembouche

What a brilliant article. It really does encapsulate all the issues and the fundamental dilemma.

It’s funny that fearless girl is quite literally corporate virtue signalling (in the marketing sense). Does that undermine the message though? Of course here the message is very much in the eye of the beholder. The literal message, as shown by the caption, appears to be ‘buy shares in our company’.

Fascinating stuff.

a child, not a woman; a potential, not an actuality.

I’m going to pretend to be an art critic and therefore say that’s an excellent choice for a NASDAQ company that primarily deals in Futures rather than current stocks.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
3 years ago

I’ve never really understood the Bull/Bear thing. Do you think there was a meeting one day:

“So we’re agreed, aggressive risk taking will be personified by a bull. But what’s the best representation for cautious timidity?”

“Eight foot tall razor clawed death machines “

Paradoxical Intention: Leader of the Deathclaw Damsels

@Alan: I think it’s another deal where men can’t have anything representing them unless it’s quote-unquote badass. Even when it’s being “cautious” or “timid”, which are icky feeeemale emotions.

Moggie
Moggie
3 years ago

Yes, good article!

And yet, there she is, the Fearless Girl. I love the little statue of the girl in the Peter Pan pose. And I resent that she’s a marketing tool. I love that she actually IS inspiring to young women and girls. And I resent that she’s a fraud. I love that she exists. And I resent the reasons she was created.

I’ll also add: I resent that she represent’s women’s power by infantilising women. She’s inspiring to little girls, maybe, but the grown women working in finance might not be so pleased to be represented by a child.

Lover of Rusted Trees
Lover of Rusted Trees
3 years ago

I just keep thinking that he’s the Golden One’s brother…