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The Official We Hunted the Mammoth Book Recommendation Thread

That's dames for ya
That’s dames for ya

So hey. I’m not officially back on duty yet — I’ll be back sometime in the next couple of days — but I thought I’d seed a little discussion here with what I’m calling The Official We Hunted the Mammoth Book Recommendation Thread.

Which is pretty self-explanatory, so have at it! Any genre, old or new. I will probably gather up the various suggestions for a later post or page.

And, yep, the book in the pic up there is a real book that exists, written by a fella named Peter Cheyney, and which you can buy on Amazon for the low, low price of $2,986.69. No, really.

That’s for a new copy. If you’re some kind of cheapskate, you could pick up a used copy instead, for a relatively thrifty $86.90.

Here are the first couple of paragraphs of the book, courtesy of Amazon, so you can have some idea what you’ll be getting for your money:

Is it hot!

I aint never been in hell, but Im tellin you that I bet it aint any hotter than this Californian desert in July.

I am drivin along past Indio an I figure that soon I am goin to see the Palm Springs lights. An I am goin some the speedometer says eighty. If it wasnt so hot it would be a swell night; but there aint any air, an there was a baby sand storm this afternoon that caught me asleep an I gotta lump of the Mojave desert or whatever they call it stuck right at the back of my throat

I strongly urge you to go to Amazon and click on the “look inside” tab to read more of Mr. Cheyney’s hardboiled prose.

Within the few short pages available in Amazon’s preview, the book’s narrator (tough guy private dick Lemmy Caution) not only manages to eat a lump of sand; he also orders a hamburger (at a hot dog joint) and some ham and eggs (at a second joint). It’s not clear if he eats any of the hamburger before splitting, but you’ll be glad to know that he at least starts eating the ham and eggs.

Oh, he also calls a guy a “sissy” and gets his ass kicked.

I know the book sounds truly amazing, but before you click the “buy” button, let me make a little counteroffer: if you’re really intent on spending $2,986.69 on a book titled “Dames Don’t Care,” pay me that amount, and I will write an entire new book by that name in the style of the original, more or less. For $86.90, I will write a (very) short story in the same style.

Or you could post book recommendations in the comments below. That’s good, too.

Here’s the full cover for Dames.

 

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Iseult The Idle
Iseult The Idle
5 years ago

Someone on a book thread on a different site mentioned that she was about to start reading Shirley Jackson’s We Have Always Lived in the Castle, and I though, “Ooh! I need to re-read some Shirley Jackson.”

Just about to finish The Leftovers, which someone recommended an embarrassingly long time ago – before it was picked up as a TV show.

Also, if you enjoy cheap and mostly (deservedly) forgotten fantasy and sci-fi, check out https://schlock-value.com/.

Full disclosure, the reviewer is a buddy of mine. He picks up cheap books at used book stores and reviews them. It’s fun.

JoeB
JoeB
5 years ago

I’ll drop my favorites, not all that recent.

American Gods, Neil Gaiman (it’s an odd book but really good, won awards in multiple genres when it came out)

Slaughterhouse Five and Breakfast of Champions, Kurt Vonnegut. Love Vonnegut generally and these are my two favorites of his.

and even though he was a racist shitbag H.P. Lovecraft stuff, basically invented a horror sub-genre and imo most of it holds up well still. Personal favorites: The Doom that Came to Sarnath, The Cats of Ulthar, The Music of Erich Zann, The Call of Cthulhu, Pickman’s Model and one of the few horror genre things that put me on edge even in bright sunny daylight The Colour Out of Space.

EJ (The Other One)
5 years ago

I’m currently rereading Seven Pillars of Wisdom by T. E. Lawrence.

Fair warning: it is breathtakingly Orientalist, to the point where the great Edward Said has risen unbidden to the top of my pile of things I need to reread next, but it’s still a great adventure story.

Margaret Pless
Margaret Pless
5 years ago

I’m currently reading “Against Our Will: Men, Women, and Rape” by Susan Brownmiller (1975). It’s generally credited as the book which changed public attitudes about rape. I like it but it’s very difficult stuff at times. For the bit I’ve read through (to Chapter 4 at this point) Brownmiller is basically studying rape throughout recorded history, including as many primary sources as she can, with the result that five or six depressingly similar accounts of say, rape by Klansmen, will appear in one after another. I suppose I find this exhausting to read because it speaks to how common rape really was/is/continues to be.

I also recently read “Shrill”, a memoir by Lindy West. That was more fun to read – or at least, it had a lot of jokes in it. I especially liked the part where West talked about standing up to Dan Savage (her boss at the time) about the fat-phobic remarks he published ca. 2004.

I also read “The Seven Daughters of Eve”, but I didn’t really enjoy it. It was sort of a pop-sci introduction to biochemistry, so to me the descriptions of say, what DNA is, or who the Iceman is, or what PCR does, felt over-simplified and all over the map. To be fair I haven’t finished that one yet so maybe it improves later on when the author starts discussing his own research in mitochondrial DNA. Still IMO there’s nothing in there you couldn’t learn by browsing Wikipedia.

In fiction, I recently read “A Darker Shade of Magic” by V.E. Schwab. I had a lot of fun reading that and would recommend it to anybody who enjoys the Harry Dresden serial novels.

Margaret Pless
Margaret Pless
5 years ago

Joe B: I feel the same way about Lovecraft. My current favorite short stories by him are “At the Mountains of Madness” and “A Shadow Out of Time”. That said Mountains of Madness still showcases a lot of Lovecraft’s weird racist ideology – the relationship between the Elder Things and shoggoths seems like a not-so-subtle allegory about what Lovecraft thinks of human race relations.

Imaginary Petal
Imaginary Petal
5 years ago

I’ve got nothing. The most recent book I’ve read was the Princeton Review GRE prep book, three years ago. :/

Eyes on the Right
5 years ago

I’m currently reading ‘United States of Jihad’ by Peter Bergen. Other interesting books I’ve recently read:

* ‘King Leopold’s Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror, and Heroism in Colonial Africa’ by Adam Hochschild
* ‘America’s Secret Jihad: The Hidden History of Religious Terrorism in the United States’ by Stuart Wexler
* ‘Angry White Men: American Masculinity at the End of an Era’ by Michael Kimmel
* ‘The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism’ by Edward E. Baptist
* ‘The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan’ by Rick Perlstein
* ‘Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town’ by Jon Krakauer
* ‘Victory: The Triumphant Gay Revolution’ by Linda Hirshman

I’m looking forward to reading ‘Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America’ by Ibram X. Kendi.

pitshade
pitshade
5 years ago

Sadly, I lost track of ‘modern’ fantasy back in the Eighties as a teen. Almost everything was either Tolkien ripoff or parody series that beat the jokes to death. However, I do love Terry Pratchett and Tanith Lee, both now sadly departed. The Science of Discworld series is good for a basic understanding of science beyond at least what US schools teach

Speaking of Tolkien and parodies, Bored if the Rings is awesome.

pitshade
pitshade
5 years ago

Lovecraft’s contemporaries and pen pals Robert E. Howard and Clark Ashton Smith are IMO more enjoyable writers and while not free of problematic elements, still much less objectionable than him.

Another favorite of mine from the time, though not from the pulps is Thorne Smith, who specialized in screwball supernatural comedy. Some of his works were adapted for movies, Topper and I Married a Witch coming to mind.

Hendrake
Hendrake
5 years ago

I recommend N.K. Jemisin’s The Fifth Season which, by the way, is nominated for the Hugos.

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/19161852-the-fifth-season

It’s a fantasy book set in a extremely geologically active world where the magicians (orogenes in the books) are capable of starting and stopping earthquakes and volcanoes, and are feared, despised and treated as second class citizens. It has good representation of LGBTQ and polyamourous people and I loved it to pieces. By the end of the book I cried a lot.

The viewpoint characters are three orogene women and one of viewpoints is conveyed by second person narration.

I should also add a Content Notice for lots of stuff (including child death, implied rape, grief, systematic oppression, etc.).

Morticia
Morticia
5 years ago

I’ve been reading “the well beloved” by Thomas Hardy and finally got sucked ( who the hell gets “ducked” auto correct, hmm? Just who?!) into the GoT vortex of unputdownability.
Which is a real word. So there

Falconer
Falconer
5 years ago

Lois McMaster Bujold recently published the latest installment of the Vorkosigan Saga, Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen, and I enjoyed it immensely.

I haven’t been reading as much in these last three years as I used to, because I have two little darlings to occupy my time, so my list is short. Sorry.

Viscaria
Viscaria
5 years ago

The last proper books I’ve read were the Vampire Diaries series, all of which I devoured in 10 days, and which I wouldn’t dare recommend to anyone unless I knew for sure that they loved trash. If you do happen to be a lover of trash, it’s 6 brainless books of YA urban fantasy vampires making out. My mind enjoyed the vacation.

Playonwords
Playonwords
5 years ago

The last non-fiction was really Steven Erikson’s Malazan Book of the Fallen. Warning! A cast of hundreds of named characters.

@ Alan Robertshaw, I think this lady could have removed a trilby as well
http://i.imgur.com/KdyKG8o.jpg

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
5 years ago

@ playonwords

Indeed. That cartoon is based on Edith Garrud. One of my heroines. Well worth reading up on. There wasn’t a lot about her until recently but that does seem to be changing now.

weirwoodtreehugger: communist bonobo
weirwoodtreehugger: communist bonobo
5 years ago

I’ve been a shit head and hardly read anything for the past year. I don’t know why. Typically I’m a big reader. This is the first time in my life I’ve gone long stretches without reading.

I feel like a bad person 🙁

Dalillama
5 years ago

I recently finished Neal Stephenson’s Seveneves. The premise is covered in the first sentence: “The moon blew up without warning and for no apparent reason”. Thereafter, in concerns itself with the consequences, which include a rain of fragments rendering the Earth uninhabitable in the next couple of year. CN for the near-total extinction of the human race; it gets damnably depressing at times.
Also Wool , by Hugh Howey, which opens up in a post-apocalyptic community living in what might be an old missile silo.

For less apocalyptic stuff, I recommend the Rivers of London series (For Yanks, the first book’s issued in the States as ‘Midnight Riot’, in which rookie London cop Peter Grant winds up on the magical enforcement squad, which he never previously knew existed.

More later.

Hippodameia
Hippodameia
5 years ago

Kim Newman’s Anno Dracula books are wonderful if you like meta. (Lots of violence, though.)

Cherie Priest’s Clockwork Century series is good, and I’m just getting into her Lovecraftian Borden Dispatches.

For non-fiction, Queen Emma and the Vikings by Harriet O’Brien was a great read. Suzanne Lebsock’s A Murder in Virginia is fascinating, and the ending was not at all what I thought it would be.

Also, Tang dynasty poetry is beautiful.

EJ (The Other One)
EJ (The Other One)
5 years ago

Good call, Dalillama.

Sinkable John
Sinkable John
5 years ago

@WWTH

That sounds like a bad case of something I have too.

I hear the remedy is an especially good read. So this might be the place.

Stephen Lawt
Stephen Lawt
5 years ago

Personaly when it comes to fiction I read a lot of the works of Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman.
I just finished the fourth book in the Death Gate Cycle and I’m loving the character development shown by the main Character Haplo

Cupcakes 4 Hitler
Cupcakes 4 Hitler
5 years ago

I found a crazy book on mental health which had been donated where I work. It was published in the sixties and had chapters on women being devious hysterical psychopaths and homosexuals being violent sociopathic deviants. I thought maybe I should throw it in the bin, but I decided not to as it shows how extreme the views were of the medical profession during that time. I guess similar books might describe women or black people as mentally ill if they demanded equal rights.

Josh
Josh
5 years ago

IT, by Stephen King. One of my favorite horror stories ever. The book is superior, but the TV movie is also pretty good.

dlouwe
dlouwe
5 years ago

First, easy recommend: Machine of Death. A collection of short stories with a shared concept – there’s a machine that will tell you how you die – but not when – with 100% accuracy, though not always with 100% specificity. There’s no specific continuity other than that (in fact, there’s two conflicting “machine origin” stories included), so each author is free to explore what kind of world they imagine such a machine would produce.

Next, a bit more particular recommend: The Malazan of the Fallen series by Steven Erikson – an incredibly dense, 10 volume fantasy epic that I just recently finished. It’s not the easiest series to read – it basically drips with in media res and Erikson does not hold your hand, but you’re rewarded if you persist and pay attention. I recommend giving it until the end of the 2nd novel before passing judgement; the first is a great book and will give a good idea of what’s to come, but the second is where Erikson really shows the depth of what he’s capable of (and will probably make you cry).

Some notes on the content:
-Fairly unique take on the fantasy setting; it avoids most LotR-esque world building tropes (there’s some rough elf analogs, but they’re unique enough in their own right). Erikson is an anthropologist and archaeologist, and you can tell he takes great care in crafting the people, cultures, and histories that make up the ‘verse. There’s plenty of apostrophes in names, but they actually tend to serve a cultural/language purpose, rather than just to make things sound fantasy-y.
-It can get really really brutal and/or disturbing at times. One of the overarching themes of the series is the consequences/horrors of war, and some of the shit he explores gets dark. One consolation is that Erikson at least tries to use these scenes for more than just to be gritty or edgy, but that doesn’t necessarily make the scenes themselves less disturbing (nor does it mean he’s always successful).
-I wouldn’t call the books specifically progressive, but there are certainly some progressive elements. There’s a good gender distribution, and women are written as people. Same-sex relationships are presented without comment, and gender roles are largely presented as constructs of the fictional cultures (e.g. a fully egalitarian mercenary group recruiting women from a city where women aren’t allowed to serve in the guard). He unfortunately doesn’t entirely avoid the “rape as catalyst for character development” trope, and while he handles it with more nuance and complexity than most, I still found it disappointing and in most cases unnecessary.

Dalillama
5 years ago

Seconding Cherie Priest.
Max Gladstone’s Craft Cycle are very different fantasy, set in a world where the gods have (mostly) been overthrown, and now things are run by necromantic corporations and immortal lich-kings, who charge in fractions of your soul for access to infrastructure and resources. Very non-Tolkein.

Tanya Huff’s Blood books are good low-key urban fantasy (PI Vicki Nelson gets involved in weird cases in and around Toronto.). It was made into a TV series, which I refuse to watch, because the gay and bi erasure chap me to an incredible degree. Her other urban fantasy series (The Enchantment Emporium) follows a woman from a magical family who inherits a junk shop, and hijinks ensue. Confederation of Valor is a fun space opera in which Gunnery Sergeant Torin Kerr kicks ass and takes names across half the galaxy. Huff also wrote a couple of other series, but I’ve not read them.

Wen Spencer is a good writer, her ongoing Elfhome series involves a genius inventor who owns a junkyard in Pittsburgh, which has been transported to the world of elves, as the series name implies.
The Ukiah Oregon books are about a young man, named Ukiah Oregon by his adoptive mothers after the place they found him, who finds that his biological history is stranger than he could have imagined.
Also she’s got a couple standalone novels that are pretty good as well. (CN for occasional mentions/implications of sexual violence; this applies to all of them)

More later

Dalillama
5 years ago

@Cupcakes 4 Hitler

I guess similar books might describe women or black people as mentally ill if they demanded equal rights.

Yup.

katz
5 years ago

I’m currently reading Titans, Victoria Scott’s robot racehorse book, which has easily the best cover of 2016.

http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1441311671l/25582556.jpg

GenJones
GenJones
5 years ago

Doc Savage “The Man of Bronze” is an example of the male power fantasy taken to it’s most comical extreme.

I also recently finished reading “The God of Small Things”, which was a harrowing experience. It tied together sexual violence, guilt, the caste system and sexism in India with folklore. The author’s style was also highly unconventional, but effective.

Tabby Lavalamp
Tabby Lavalamp
5 years ago

Well, if we want hard-boiled detectives, I love Sara Paretsky’s V.I. Warshawski books.

Anne Lewis, Jib Creatr
Anne Lewis, Jib Creatr
5 years ago

Re-de-lurking under a new name, here. (Formerly the very short-lived Luna, though I doubt anyone remembers.)

As far as fiction books I enjoy, I’m a sucker for ADVENTURE! (TM), so I’d say my favorite novel is Raise the Titanic! by Clive Cussler. It combines ADVENTURE! with one of my special interests, the RMS Titanic. I do have a caveat about it and other Cussler novels, though: Dirk Pitt (the protagonist) is a “””””benevolent””””” chauvinist pig, and every book has a sex scene in it, no matter how unnecessary. However, they can be skipped, since they’re short and irrelevant to the overall plot. Despite the issues Cussler seems to have with writing ~WOMZ~ in his books, his vivid descriptions of events make up for it in my mind. Basically this book is my problematic fave.

Now, I’m happy to say my current non-fiction read is much more progressive: A People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn. Each chapter focuses on a disadvantaged group in a period of USian history, such as the Native American tribes living on the east coast and the Caribbean Islands when Europeans arrived. I’ve just finished a chapter on women in early US society (like between Revolutionary War and Civil War). To the surprise of absolutely no one here, I assume, many of the tactics used by men to silence women then are the same as ones used today by both admitted misogynists and unaware ones.

TL;DR: Hi, I’m a lurking nerd, and I like books and stuff.

P.S.: Internet cookies to anyone who knows what movie the character in the first part of my name is from.

ETA: How do I change my icon?

Nequam
Nequam
5 years ago

I’ve been reading a lot of nonfiction (books on graphic and industrial design in particular) and poetry lately. Baudelaire’s been of particular interest as I’m pondering some ideas for binding a version of Les Fleurs du Mal.

beth
beth
5 years ago

I’ve been enjoying the
Mammoth Book of SF Stories by Women.

Mike
Mike
5 years ago

I’ve been reading a lot of poetry these days. Some stuff I’ve found worthwhile recently:

Paul Celan – Last Poems

Denise Levertov – Life in the Forest

Sharon Olds – The Father

Anne Sexton – The Awful Rowing Toward God

St.-John Perse – Anabasis

Claudia Rankine – Citizen: An American Lyric

Also, something perhaps more-relevant to WHTM: I’m in the middle of the audio version of ‘The State of Play’ – a book of criticism, of and related to video games, that seems to have kinda-sorta emerged in response to GamerGate (it features some of GG’s least-favorite people: Zoe Quinn, Anita Sarkeesian, Katherine Cross, Leigh Alexander). There are segments that talk about GG directly, but overall it’s more about exploring the idea that the gaming medium can – and should – be subject to thoughtful, intellectual critique (GG helped show just how much entrenched resistance to this sort of criticism there is in the gaming world). It’s a pretty interesting book so far (naturally a bit of a mixed bag, since it’s an anthology), but many of the criticisms raised feel a bit, well, elementary; that’s not because the writers are doing something wrong, but because we likely have a long way to go before critics are able to discuss video games with the kind of complexity that can easily be found in writings on literature, film, visual art, etc.

Oh and also, there are several different readers for the audio book, and that’s kind of a mixed bag, too (for example, the people who read the chapter by Sarkeesian and Cross basically suck, which is a shame because the chapter itself is pretty compelling).

Viscaria
Viscaria
5 years ago

@WWTH, Sinkable John

That’s actually why I chose to read something so lightweight. I used to be a voracious reader, and it was such a source of joy, but these days I just find it takes too much energy. I figure I’ll get back into it with baby steps, starting with some fluffy brain cotton candy. But I don’t think it’s a reflection of who we are as people; I think it’s more where we are as people, and where we can afford to put our time and effort.

I’ve also been reading a lot of graphic novels, since they suit my short attention span. I highly, highly recommend Saga by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples. It’s the story of parents who hail from opposite sides of a galaxy-wide conflict. The characters are unique and rounded and wonderful. The art is absolutely extraordinary. Always beautiful, sometimes grotesque. (It’s also often NSFW, so be aware if you’re reading on the train or whatever.) I think they put out a monthly issue, but I’ve been reading the collected paperbacks as they come out.

Edit @Beth: Well it must be good, because mammoths!

Rabukurafuto
Rabukurafuto
5 years ago

I’m currently reading Janet Joyce Holden’s Carousel, David A. McIntee’s The New Adventures: White Darkness, and the anthology book L. Ron Hubbard Presents Writers of the Future Volume XVI. Plus the usual fiction magazines I read like The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Nightmare, Lightspeed (just released the People of Colo(u)r Destroy Science Fiction! special), Under the Bed, New Realm, and Nebula Rift. It’s all quite good so far.

Iseult The Idle
June 2, 2016 at 11:07 am
Also, if you enjoy cheap and mostly (deservedly) forgotten fantasy and sci-fi, check out https://schlock-value.com/.

That is glorious, and reminds me that I need to someday acquire the US edition of Make Your Own Adventure With Doctor Who: Crisis in Space, because look at this cover!

comment image

There are some lurid and trashy Doctor Who novel covers (especially in the early ’90s) but this has to take the biscuit.

dlouwe
dlouwe
5 years ago

I hear the remedy is an especially good read. So this might be the place.

This is actually something that the Malazan series I recommended above helped me with. I’m pretty good at enjoying most things even if I’m not “into” it – and after a long spell of only reading books that were passably enjoyable I mostly stopped reading for at least a couple years. But after a full year of immersing myself in something that actually gripped me, my hunger for books is back with a vengeance, and I have a better idea of what to look for to satisfy me.

Wicked Witch of Whatever
Wicked Witch of Whatever
5 years ago

@Dalillama-

Second the Enchantment Emporium series! I love how she writes the Gales. You always know they are a magical family but most of their difference sneaks up on you over the course of the books – just a few subtle shades away from human. Also, how she writes warm, loving and affectionate female characters who sleep with a lot of people, without any hint of them being a male fantasy of NSA sex, or assuming they must have a James Bond level callousness in regard to their partners.

katz
5 years ago

I’ve also been reading a lot of graphic novels, since they suit my short attention span. I highly, highly recommend Saga by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples. It’s the story of parents who hail from opposite sides of a galaxy-wide conflict. The characters are unique and rounded and wonderful. The art is absolutely extraordinary. Always beautiful, sometimes grotesque. (It’s also often NSFW, so be aware if you’re reading on the train or whatever.) I think they put out a monthly issue, but I’ve been reading the collected paperbacks as they come out.

Saga is incredible. Vaughan and Staples are both powerhouses.

Dalillama
5 years ago

Well, if we want hard-boiled detectives, I love Sara Paretsky’s V.I. Warshawski books.

Those are very good. For a more lighthearted (mostly; one book is pretty grim) mystery series, I recommend Sharyn McCrumb’s Elizabeth MacPherson series. Bimbos of the Death Sun is a stand-alone mystery set at a sci-fi con, and is a guaranteed laugh for anyone who’s spent any time at one (there’s a sequel, but it’s pretty crap and I don’t recommend it). Her Ballad novels are, in my opinion, actually much better, but they’re also often really depressing. They follow Spencer Arrowood, sheriff of a slowly dying Appalachian town, and each book also tells the story of a (genuine) historical case that parallels his. The Songcatcher tells the (true) story of Malcolm Mccourry, who was kidnapped from Islay as a child, and lived a lifetime as a sailor, another as a lawyer, and a third as a pioneer, as well as some of his (fictitious) descendants. (Incidentally, McCrumb is herself a genuine descendant of his).
Gigi Pandian’s Jaya Jones books involve a globetrotting history professor seeking out antiquities and solving mysteries related to them.
@Viscaria
Laura Resnick’s Esther Diamond series (paranormal mysteries involving a struggling actress and her alchemist pal) are pretty fast reads and generally light hearted, if massively heteronormative. CN for an offscreen rape in the first book, but other than that, they’re very lighthearted :p.

Gigi Pandian’s Accidental Alchemist books are also in that category, featuring a Zoe Faust, who accidentally made herself immortal in the 1600s, and a French chef and escapologist who happens to be an animated gargoyle from Notre Dame.

cheesynougats
cheesynougats
5 years ago

Just finished Stanislaw Lem’s Memoirs Found in a Bathtub. Some of the best dystopian satire I have ever read. If you have ever played the old comedy dice-and-paper RPG Paranoia, this book is that setting.

kupo
kupo
5 years ago

There are lots of books I love, but I think I’ll take this opportunity to promote a self-published author I’ve been enjoying. Her name is Autumn Kalquist and she writes space dramas with female lead characters. They’re easy reads. She also writes some music inspired by her stories and she sends it out to her fans for free, and she holds lots of contests for things like kindles and signed copies of her books.

http://www.autumnkalquist.com

brian
brian
5 years ago

here’s the books I submitted as suggestions to an online book club I joined recently:
Feed, by M.T. Anderson
The Diamond Age, by Neal Stephenson
Geek Live, by Katherine Dunn
House of Leaves, by Math Z. Danielewski
Embassytown, by China Miéville

all favorites of mine.
I also second the recommendation of The Fifth Season. it’s great. I’ve also currently been consuming a lot of Brandon Sanderson on audio book… he’s worth checking out if you like fantasy and want something a little out of the ordinary.

Saphira
Saphira
5 years ago

I’m re-reading the Discworld series by Terry Pratchett because we just moved and I can’t find three-fourths of my library.

Paradoxical Intention - Resident Cheeseburger Slut

I do read a lot of manga/comics when I’m feeling like I want to read, but I also want something light.

Though, I do have quite a few novels sitting around that I’ve been meaning to get to:

The Looking Glass Wars by Frank Bedor
The Dante Club by Matthew Pearl
The Last Unicorn by Peter S. Beagle*
Confession of a Buddhist Atheist by Stephen Batchelor
Philosophy in the Boudoir by Marquis de Sade

Aaaand there’s like a whole library’s worth of books I still want to get, like the last book, The Library of Souls, in the Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children series by Ransom Riggs, preferably before I see the movie, which is coming out in September.**

*My mom loved this movie when I was a kid, I must have seen it a billion times. So, I was super excited when I found the book on a thrift store trip I took with her for my birthday.

**The movie is directed by Tim Burton, and it’s not supposed to come out until late September, which is odd, because I haven’t seen any advertisements for it. : P

So I watched a trailer, and I’m already going “That’s not right, that’s not right, that’s definitely not right, what the fuck“, so I’m not sure I’ll watch it until I’ve re-read the first book, if I decide to watch it at all. : /

Here’s the trailer:

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
5 years ago

I’d recommend the Cherub series. Although they’re aimed at a YA audience they’re brilliant.

Basic premise: The intelligence services recruit kids from care homes to assist in undercover operations. A drug dealer might not let a new neighbour into their home, but if their kids bring the new neighbours’ kid round to play video games, then they might not get suspicious; and a 12 year old can plant bugs as easily as an adult.

It’s a total deconstruction of all the Alex Rider type stuff. Put real kids in situations where they have ready access to drugs and guess what might happen.

Fantastic array of diverse characters too.

Auz
Auz
5 years ago

And, yep, the book in the pic up there is a real book that exists, written by a fella named Peter Cheyney, and which you can buy on Amazon for the low, low price of $2,986.69. No, really.

Sounds like one of those books caught in a bot price war. http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2384102,00.asp

I’m reading Mary Beard’s SPQR, which I’m enjoying – http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/18/books/review-in-spqr-a-history-of-ancient-rome-mary-beard-tackles-myths-and-more.html?_r=0

Binjabreel
Binjabreel
5 years ago

Seconding recommendations for Feed, American Gods, and The Diamond Age. They’re excellent.

Also, Anansi Boys, the sequel (ish) to American Gods. It’s not as epic, but it’s arguably a better and tighter story. It follows some of Mr. Nancy’s kids around.

Also, I highly recommend “The Shadow of the Wind”, by Carlos Ruiz Zafon. Magical realism during the Spanish civil war about a mysterious author whose books keep getting destroyed. The translation is excellent and the anti-fascism is as relevant as ever. Ironically (and vaguely hilariously) I had two copies of it I bought for my wife to read get ruined or shredded before she could.

Dalillama
5 years ago

Speaking of mysteries, I recommend the Sage Adair Historical Mysteries by S.L. Stoner. The title character is a two-fisted undercover labour operative operating out of turn of the 20th Portland (Oregon). Aided by his mother and some staunch comrades, Sage investigates the skullduggery of the bosses and fights for justice (CN for child prostitution coming up several times).
For those who like their detectives very hard-boiled, Blair Underwood, Steven Barnes, and Tananarive Due will take you on a tour of the seamiest side of Hollywood with actor and part-time bodyguard Tennyson Hardwick. (First book is Casanegra. CN for all the things.)

Seconding recommendations for Feed, American Gods, and The Diamond Age. They’re excellent.

Also, Anansi Boys, the sequel (ish) to American Gods. It’s not as epic, but it’s arguably a better and tighter story. It follows some of Mr. Nancy’s kids around.

Thirding this.

Also, I recommend reading the novel of Treasure of the Sierra Madre; there’s a lot that doesn’t make it into the movie.

peaches
peaches
5 years ago

The Coyote Kings of the Space-Age Bachelor Pad, by Minister Faust. For those looking for fantasy and sci-fi that’s not lily-white. It’s a wild ride, with humor, horror and more.

Let the Right One In, by John Ajvide Lindqvist. I read this and enjoyed it a great deal, and then I handed it to my husband. A few days later he gave it back, it was too depressing for him. I don’t really have much of an upper limit for gore, depression, ect, when it comes to books. Movies, yeah, but not books. I read this after seeing the (Swedish) movie, and I think that’s the best way to go. Everything the movie implies, the book spells out.

The Wooden Sea, by Jonathon Carroll. I love his books. He can take the most overused tropes, but the way he gets to them is amazing.

Doomed and Damned by Chuck Palahniuk. A 13 year old girl dies, goes to hell, and tries to take it over.

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