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I Know Her: Off-topic, Off-duty Friday Night 90s Flashback Rockin’ Party

I got on a bit of a 90s kick last night, so here’s the Spotify playlist that came from it, a kind of 90s alt-rock-chick greatest hits mixtape. So enjoy, if you’re into this kind of thing!

Ironically, my 90s binge was inspired by a band that’s not on the mixtape, because they’re not on Spotify: Cake Like, a band fronted by Kerri Kenney, perhaps better known for playing the somewhat off-kilter Deputy Trudy Wiegel on Reno 911. Poking around on Youtube, I had found some episodes of Viva Variety, the extremely odd and rather short-lived variety show parody show she did with Thomas Lennon, who also went on to greater fame on Reno 911.

So that led me to some Cake Like videos. The friend I showed them to was not impressed. But hey, I like them, and maybe some of you will too.

(In case you’re wondering, I’m still off-duty, and probably will be over the long weekend as well; I may post some more off-topic stuff before I officially return.)

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amandajane5
amandajane5
4 years ago

Thank you for this! I didn’t realize that Cannonball had an impact on me, but it started playing and I was in my high school best friends bedroom for a sleepover.

weirwoodtreehugger: communist bonobo

Hey, I’ve heard Cake Like too! I think I even have Lorraine’s car in my ipod.

Your list could also use some Thee Headcoatees. Perhaps Ballad of the Insolent Pup. Because of the misandry, of course.

https://youtu.be/sj8WRardA0k

I always like your music taste, David. Mostly because you’re one of the few people I know of who listen to the Television Personalities.

FrickleFrackle
FrickleFrackle
4 years ago

Nice to see PJ Harvey represented. Anyone else here like her stuff? I quite like Is This Desire? and Uh Huh Her. There’s some Bikini Kill in here, that’s never a bad sign. Also, I see some artists whose names I recognize but who I’ve never heard, like Veruca Salt and Belly.

As an aside, maybe this thread should just be the place where we post our tastes in music? I have a big list of artists but don’t feel I have an opportunity to talk about them ever.

Makroth
Makroth
4 years ago

This whole band is awesome, especially if you`re into experimental extreme metal. This is one of their more mellow songs:

https://youtu.be/TVSpsVS7JzM?t=2

Weird. When i erased the first line, the video would not embed.

Makroth
Makroth
4 years ago

Can anybody tell me how to embed videos here?

This whole band is awesome, especially if you`re into experimental extreme metal. This is one of their more mellow songs:

CPphazor
CPphazor
4 years ago

Enjoy your break, Dave 🙂

Imaginary Petal
Imaginary Petal
4 years ago

I don’t think anyone will be interested in this, but here’s a short history of 90s dancehall, with non-homophobic song links.

The early 90s were dominated by artists who had already had their major breakthrough in the 80s, including Admiral Bailey, Super Cat, and the legendary Ninjaman who never reached his potential as a recording artist, but is still a widely celebrated live performer to this day. Below is a video clip from 1990, showing the epic clash between Ninjaman and Shabba Ranks, with a guest appearance by a very young Risto Benji. This is from the show Sting, which is held annually on Boxing Day.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Htzzg0jaMow

A few things happened in the early 90s, which brought in a new era of dancehall music. First of all, Shabba Ranks got a huge international breakthrough and brought global attention to Jamaican music in a way that hadn’t been seen since the days of Bob Marley. His style of delivery naturally influenced many of the younger artists, and permanently changed the direction of Jamaican music in general.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GUT5Uf96Rh8

Meanwhile, many major artists made their recording debut in right around the beginning of the new decade, including Capleton, Mad Cobra, Beenie Man (who had released an album as a child DJ in 1983, but now returned to the scene as an adult), Bounty Killer, and many more. At Sting 1993, Bounty Killer and Beenie Man had a famous clash that was the starting point of a beef which is still active to some extent, 23 years later. Both of these artists continued to produce hit records for the entirety of the 90s, and Beenie Man is still one of the most popular artists in Jamaica at the moment, while Bounty Killer has taken a back seat to younger artists since the early 2000s.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H-lEtWyD0sw

The early 90s was also known as the Bogle era of dancehall. Bogle was an enormously popular dancer who would create dance moves to all sorts of popular songs, and whose dances sometimes crossed over into mainstream culture. The artist Buju Banton had his debut around this time, and was closely associated with Bogle in his early days. Bogle was sadly killed in a shooting in 2005, while Buju Banton is currently serving a 10 year prison sentence in the US, for cocaine trafficking.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XAFjEV-6eiY

With the rise of a new generation of dancehall artists, some of the superstars of the 1980s slowly faded, notably Josey Wales, Yellowman, Peter Metro, Ranking Joe, etc. It was also an extremely violent time, with many artists losing their lives to gun violence and other incidents.

The artist Tiger, originally known as Ranking Tiger, had many hits in the 80s and for a while dominated the reggae charts into the 90s with his highly unorthodox style. In 1993, he sadly suffered life threatening injuries from a motorcycle accident, which ruined his ability to sing and perform. It took a decade before his voice was strong enough to record again, and he has done some live performances since the mid-2000s, although there’s not much left of what is one of my personal favorite artists of all time.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lODbQJ5_eU

One of the foundation artists of early dancehall was Tenor Saw, who died under mysterious circumstances in 1988, in Texas. The popular singer Nitty Gritty was shot and killed in Brooklyn in 1991. 1993 saw the death of one of Jamaica’s brightest stars, Pan Head, who was murdered by an unknown gunman. The artist Dirtsman was shot to death only two months later, an incident which led to Dirtsman’s brother, with the stage name Papa San, turning away from dancehall culture and starting a second career as a Christian gospel singer. The legendary 1980s artist Early B was also shot and killed the following year.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQajQrky08o

The bloody and tragic events of the early 90s led to a backlash of more uplifting and silly music in the second half of the decade. The label Main Street, with producer Danny Brownie, dominated the airwaves for a few years, with artists such as General Degree, Madd Anju, Hawkeye, Buccaneer, Goofy, Crissy D, Red Rat, and more.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-5VsgkBeJ10

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kBiCUz2-rCw

According to Red Rat himself, he got his stage name from his friend General Degree, with the motivation “you’re red and you look like a rat”.

An emerging trend from the mid-90s and on was the tendency of artists to group themselves together in crews or collectives, mostly collaborating with other artists within the same group, and using their own in-house producers. Main Street was already mentioned above, and Beenie Man’s Shocking Vibes crew was another popular label from this time. In some cases, artists performed together under a band name instead of as individual artists “featuring” one another. Most notably, this included the Monster Shock Crew, consisting of Roundhead, General B, and the eccentric singer Ghost, as well as the Scare Dem Crew, with members Elephant Man, Harry Toddler, Boom Dandemyte, and singer Nitty Kutchie, with Bounty Killer serving as their mentor and sometimes guest starring.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Mj7TAUKCnE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CR_l2evZgL8

Elephant Man, in particular, went on to have an extremely successful solo career in the 00s, with several international hits.

The final years of the decade was dominated by the widespread return of so called singjaying, a form of vocal style located somewhere between traditional singing and what is in Jamaica known as deejaying or toasting. (A Jamaican DJ would be called an MC in American lingo, while an American DJ would be called a Selecta in Jamaican lingo.) Most popular artists in the 1980s were to some extent singjays, but the success of Shabba Ranks and others shifted the focus to more rough voiced deejays, sometimes bordering on rap. Two of the big breakthrough acts of the late 90s were Mr. Vegas and the 4-man group T.O.K. (Touch Of Klass, or Taking Over Kingston).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kBqyy-bAUm0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBtSkR36nNA

While Mr. Vegas’ early hits now sound very outdated to a modern dancehall audience, he was incredibly influential at the time, and arguably served as a forerunner to dancehall singers and deejays of the modern day, such as Jah Vinci, Popcaan, Blak Ryno, Mavado, Demarco, Taurus Riley, Deep Jahi, etc. Mr. Vegas’ instantly recognizable singing style was adopted in his early career, when he got into a fight and had his jaw broken by a crowbar. While his jaw was wired shut for an extended period of time, he practiced singing without moving his jaw, i.e. with a wide smile and almost clenched teeth. According to his own story, his audience responded very well to his first few shows after the injury, so he just continued singing in that fashion for his entire career.

I have mentioned almost no female artists in this post, and that’s mostly because there weren’t many around in the 90s. Women in Jamaican popular music had mostly been singers, and the general style of dancehall in the 90s didn’t incorporate much straight up singing. However, the decade did see the rise of Lady Saw, nicknamed the Queen of Dancehall. She is still recording to this day, and a very respected artist with “dancehall elder” status. This is one of the biggest hit songs of her career, on the classic Joyride riddim.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XhO1C191YsM

Another female artist who was prominent in the 90s was Lady Mackerel. She had a few songs in the late 80s, but continued recording throughout the following decade. This was in a time where female deejays were almost always prefixed as “Lady”, “Sister”, “Queen”, etc. The few popular female deejays of the 80s were Sister Nancy (who now works at a bank in New Jersey), Lady Ann, Mother Liza (who was mostly active as a duo together with N****r Kojak – yes, that was his actual stage name, minus the stars), Queen Patra, and Lady G. When Lady Mackerel, real name Charmaine Munroe, came to the scene, she was promoted as a “female version” of popular male deejay Major Mackerel, and her first hit record was a “response” to a Major Mackerel song, from a female perspective.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-CZp2dfEbAU

She later retired her Lady Mackerel persona, stating she never wanted to be a mackerel to begin with. After some time away from the industry, she came back in the 00s and had a successful career as Macka Diamond.

I’ll end with an honorary mention of the deejay Reggie Stepper, who I’ve called “the King of Schwa”, due to his frequent use of the mid central, or neutral, vowel sound. He would incorporate strange shouts of the neutral vowel sound into almost every song, which proved to be a powerful gimmick among the hundreds and hundres of new deejays fighting for the spotlight in the early 90s.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zeiki-obkvM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WS09DvBx5-Y

Chu chuuuu

LindsayIrene
4 years ago

I’ve been on kind of a 90s kick lately, too. Mostly trip hop. Portishead, Massive Attack, Hooverphonic.

peaches
peaches
4 years ago

Oh, this is great. It’s a lot like my husband’s taste in music. I call him a ‘girl-band geek’, since he loves girls in bands. Mostly rock, but the occasional singer-songwriter and pop star too. Things got really fun after I introduced him to metal (he never listened to it as a teen, liking post-punk better). Now I hear Halestorm and other female fronted metal bands a lot. This is fine.

EJ (The Other One)
EJ (The Other One)
4 years ago

@LindsayIrene:
Good call. Trip hop was awesome. Are you into Sneaker Pimps?

Suspiria
Suspiria
4 years ago

Hope you’re enjoying your break David. I’ve recently fallen in love with Bongwater, so I’ll (hopefully) leave this here:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=SnYHjZ2IyFo

pitshade
pitshade
4 years ago

weirwoodtreehugger: communist bonobo

Good call. Trip hop was awesome. Are you into Sneaker Pimps?

Don’t know if she is, but I am! Also, IAMX aka Chris Corner from the Sneaker Pimps.

EJ (The Other One)
EJ (The Other One)
4 years ago

You have good taste, WWTH.

Paradoxical Intention - Resident Cheeseburger Slut

Slightly off-topic, but Jackie made this awesome Handsome Jack playlist if anyone would like a listen to that.

(This playlist is the reason that Geekin’ is my new jam.)

EJ (The Other One)
EJ (The Other One)
4 years ago

Are you two making playlists for one another? Can we enquire, or would that be pryin’?

AvidReader
AvidReader
4 years ago

@FrickleFrackle:

Nice to see PJ Harvey represented. Anyone else here like her stuff?

Down by the Water is on my Halloween playlist.

AvidReader
AvidReader
4 years ago

Have you heard Pretend We’re Dead by L7? It seems like it would fit in with the rest of your playlist.

Paradoxical Intention - Resident Cheeseburger Slut

EJ: Nope, Jackie made this one for one of their favorite Borderlands characters, and linked it to me so I could have a listen, so I thought I’d share.

guy
guy
4 years ago

I have returned from Miku Expo 2016 New York! Figure I’ll put it all in the music thread rather than split it over 2 or 3 threads; scroll down if you just want a sample video from a different concert.

I’d expected the crowd to be big but small for the venue, since it’s a relatively small US fandom compared to other concerts that are held in New York. On a closely related note I’d expected to have a chair. But nope, Hammerstein Ballroom and standing room only on the floor, and that’s the 1:30 concert with a repeat at 8.

My first inkling that I might have misjudged the scale was when me and my mom were walking down 9th avenue and I noticed a bunch of people standing on the street and thought “oh, a line for another event, I guess at that steakhouse” then noticed no one was going inside.

Mom: I’m thinking this might be the line
Me: Yeah, maybe
(spot blue-green hair in twintails)
Me: Yes, this is definitely the line, you can tell by the cosplayers

And then probably at least a few hundred more people in clumps containing either cosplayers or vocaloid and anime shirts walked by to get in line behind us and we started to regret not bringing water bottles. Doors opened at 12:30 and we actually got to them around 1:10 to recieve little booklets and official concert glowsticks.

Then… well, I think the concert organizers decided to deliberately troll us in multiple dimensions. First up: the booklet was very much Miku only, provoking grumbling from Rin cosplayers and Kaito fangirls (of which there were plenty). Then Anamanaguchi (US electronic/chiptune band) did an opening act that was structured so it seemed like every song was the last one and this went on for 45 minutes with two breaks to give speeches that sounded like they were leading into “And now, the moment you’ve all been waiting for!” As of about 2/3rds of the way through, I was thinking “this is good music, but seriously I didn’t come all the way to New York for the opening act and it would be really nice to have some rough idea of how long it is” Then a final speech and a ten-minute break.

So, ballroom full of standing, grumbling impatient people an hour after the concert starts and me resentfully wishing I could liveblog my frustration to you guys. Then finally the lights go down and they start using the rear-projection screen, with a geometric pattern moving and shifting and the names of the live instrumentalists appearing. And then…

Silhouette goes up on screen, accompanied by “KAITO”. Massive cheer. Fades and is replace by a new one with “MEIKO”, more cheering. Then “LUKA”, then “LEN”, then “RIN” (loudest cheer) and finally “MIKU”, and the show itself promptly kicks off with “World is mine”. Followed by “The disappearance of Hatsune Miku” to screw with new fans who don’t know Japanese, because it ends with the image fuzzing and then vanishing in the style of a technical malfunction. Then another song, this one I’m not sure on, then Miku gave a little intro speech, then it continued.

The songs were mostly old favorites on the Japanese Vocaloid concert circuit, and indeed mostly Miku with one solo each from the others. Notables:

“World End Dance Hall”, Miku and Luka duet, catchy pop song, Japanese
“Magnet”, Miku and Luka duet, lesbian love song, Japanese but there is an English version somewhere on YouTube since they’ve both got English voicebanks.
“Glass Wall”, Miku solo, inspired by a long-distance relationship, English, opened for Lady Gaga once.
“Tokyo Teddy Bear” Rin solo, high-speed, violent and intense, Japanese
“Remote Control” Rin/Len, chant, Japanese with many English phrases
“Just Be Friends” Luka solo, sorta chant, apparently actually a male narrator with an answer song from a female narrator also using Luka, mostly Japanese but considerable English segments
“Ten Thousand Stars” Miku solo, new, English, kinda loud instruments, from what I caught high-energy but melancholy.
“Sharing The World” theme song for the 2014 LA/NY tour, cheerful and upbeat, Miku solo, mostly English.

I’d been expecting one new English song from Rin/Len and Luka to demo their V4 English voicebanks, but apparently not.

Anyhow:

https://youtu.be/O17f3lB7BFY

It was pretty much like that except in a smaller room and the audience was less organized.

guy
guy
4 years ago

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O17f3lB7BFY

I’m having trouble figuring out how to embed this properly.

guy
guy
4 years ago
kupo
kupo
4 years ago

@guy
I think someone said you need to remove the ‘s’ from https to get it to embed.

guy
guy
4 years ago

Apparently there is more to it; no dice.

LindsayIrene
4 years ago

@ EJ (The Other One)

I haven’t been listening to Sneaker Pimps, but I think I’ll probably start 😀

So has anyone mentioned Babes in Toyland yet?

mobiusclimber
mobiusclimber
4 years ago

Since we’re talking about favorite “girl bands” and Japanese music, here’s a song by one of my favorite groups, TsuShiMaMiRe:

Pietro_McM
Pietro_McM
4 years ago

Favourite ‘girl‘ bands is it?

One from Japan:

https://youtu.be/3zWwd8n2JVI

Playbaby

Not exactly a ‘girl‘ band, but they are from London, The Dustaphonics:

https://youtu.be/7wCuZTAJsfE

Music makes me happy. :>D

Imaginary Petal
Imaginary Petal
4 years ago

My 90s post finally came out of moderation. :p

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

Oh gawd, this reminds me of when a local nightclub did ‘themed’ nights. I could understand “60s”, “70s” and possibly even “80s” night, but I did end up harrumphing “How can the “90s” be nostalgic? That like only just happened”

My friends gave me the same pitiful look they do when I talk about “great new bands” Nirvana and The Prodigy.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

@ IP

I don’t think anyone will be interested in this

I found that really interesting. Shabba!

Eva Vavoom
4 years ago

Thank you all for a really inspiring thread full of musical discoveries.

For the entire 90s I had my radio in Quebec City hacked to get Montreal stations and it was permanently tuned to CHOM FM when they played classic rock. I also had a shortband radio that I used to listen to Radio France Internationale in all the far flung French outposts. I have no idea what’s up with music today. I have sequestered myself into a quiet fortress.

kupo
kupo
4 years ago

@Alan

“How can the “90s” be nostalgic? That like only just happened”

My husband gets a kind of nostalgia for certain music from the 2000’s that baffles me.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

@ kupo

I set a quiz for our local pub and I did come in for some comments about my “current events” round.

Now if you’ll excuse me; I need to go yell at some clouds. 🙂

Robert
Robert
4 years ago

Some of the comments piqued my curiosity, so I went to the Wikipedia entry for ‘heavy metal ‘. Well, that was a good antidote for intellectual pride. Reminded me of when my older son tried to explain the difference between dubstep and drum-and-bass.

I have eclectic tastes in music, but there are entire swaths that I just don’t understand. I did spend a good deal of time and effort educating myself about jazz several years ago, and can now listen with enjoyment. Still don’t understand what syncopation is, but at least I can tell a trumpet from a saxophone from a trombone just by listening carefully.

mobiusclimber
mobiusclimber
4 years ago

Japanese national-treasure, Sheena Ringo:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ECxBHhMc7oI

Did someone say Babes in Toyland?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09aJfTUR94k

Any Spore fans? Great forgotten noise-rock band:

Kat
Kat
4 years ago

@Alan Robertshaw

Now if you’ll excuse me; I need to go yell at some clouds.

I’ll stay behind to write a polite letter to the editor. Once I drop it in the mailbox, I’ll call my friend from the nearby phone booth. We might go bowling.

See you later, alligator!

David
David
4 years ago

David, I’m definitely behind the vast majority of the performers on your playlist. May I add Helium? If you have The Breeders, Throwing Muses, Belly, et al., you must like Helium, no? Mary Timony is still rocking, too, bless her.

Patricia Kayden
Patricia Kayden
4 years ago

@Imaginary Petal,

Really enjoyed your write-up on dancehall music. Not really a big fan although I recognize a few of the artists and songs. For me, Bob Marley was Reggae and I still listen to other old school artists. The newer artists and music are a bit too risque for my liking.

Thanks for the great history. I’ll watch the linked videos when I have time.

DrHoveiny
DrHoveiny
4 years ago

Johnny Bluejeans! Ahhh loved Viva Variety and Cake Like.

Mels
Mels
4 years ago

@mobiusclimber

Shiina Ringo (/Shena Ringo/Sheena Ringo) in a WHTM thread? Two of my favorite things together! God bless.

Japan has so many alternative music queens.

Tsuki Amano

Chara

Yumi Nakashima

LinuxLea
LinuxLea
4 years ago

The fascination with this piece of vocalizer software creeps me the fuck out.
It’ a piece of software!
It’s Britney Spears for the socially awkward.
And the neckbeards, don’t forget the neckbeards.
It’s not a creative endeavour, it’s a product.
It’s worse than any cynical consumer culture nightmare William Gibson dreamt up.

This is exactly why I don’t call myself a nerd anymore, because you automatically get associated with this creepy fandom that gushes over a fictional teenaged girl and buys worthless plastic crap for millions of dollars.
Another reason is that the creepy fandom automatically assumes you are one of them and start pestering you with their borderline pedophile fascination for animated children.

These people are the reason “normal” people give me strange looks when they find out I like asian films. You always have to clarify that you like Kurosawa, Kitano, Woo and stuff like that.

Every time I see someone running around in these kind of cosply-y outfits without a reason, I really want to beat some sense into them.

I hope these people grow up one day, only to wake up every morning to experience shame for what they helped create.

Rant over.

For context:
I worked in what you could call a “nerd store” for several years, and these people were the bane of my existence. Obnoxious without exception, gifted with the attentionspan of a goldfish, completely stunned when they found out you didn’t share their love for stupid shit (And yes, “One Piece”, “Dragon Ball Z” etc can be adequately described as such), rude, demanding and generally a pain to deal with.

kupo
kupo
4 years ago

@ LinuxLea
Holy fuck, how about you not generalize people for their fucking interests? I don’t feel like I can come up with a coherent response right now for all of this, but I’ll address one thing: if I make a piece of music with my korg keyboard, is it not a creative endeavor? If so, how are the synthethic sounds on my keyboard any different from the synthetic sounds on the vocaloid software? If not, how is a synthetic instrument different from a physical instrument?

LinuxLea
LinuxLea
4 years ago

I have suffered at the hands of these people, they have earned my ire.

Imaginary Petal
Imaginary Petal
4 years ago

@LinuxLea

Um. What the fuck was that?

EDIT: You’ve “suffered at the hands” of people liking things you don’t like? Wow, I can’t imagine how terrible that must’ve been for you.

Viscaria
Viscaria
4 years ago

I legitimately don’t even understand what that was all about or even what prompted it.

Imaginary Petal
Imaginary Petal
4 years ago

@Viscaria

Yeah me neither. Thoroughly confusing angry rant out of nowhere.

Viscaria
Viscaria
4 years ago

Also Britney Spears is not, to the best of my knowledge, a piece of software.

EJ (The Other One)
EJ (The Other One)
4 years ago

I worked in what you could call a “nerd store” for several years, and these people were the bane of my existence.

I feel you. It is the nature of any customer service job that afterwards, you will utterly and entirely hate the particular demographic that you served. It’s just a thing. Ask me to tell you airline stories sometime.

That doesn’t make it okay to generalise like that; but your frustration and anger are genuine and I understand where they come from.

Scented Fucking Hard Chairs
Scented Fucking Hard Chairs
4 years ago

It’ a piece of software!

So’s Linux.

LinuxLea
LinuxLea
4 years ago

@EJ: Yeah, they made up about 15% of customers, but they took up about 80% percent of the time. And they puked on me, touched other customers inapropriately, and tried to get me fired when I couldn’t provide any hentai.

@SFHC: And I don’t mistake it for a performance artist.