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#gamergate antifeminism catcalling empathy deficit entitled babies evil sexy ladies evil ugly women imaginary oppression misogyny

Men oppressed by feminists telling them that maybe they shouldn’t constantly ogle women

If feminists get their way, this will be illegal!
If feminists get their way, this will be illegal!

Fellas! I don’t know if you know this, but we’re living in an, um, let me be sure I have this right, a “totalitarian regime dictatorship of forcing social justice and politically correctness.”

That might seem a little bit farfetched, at least to you blue pill people. But I read about this dire new development in the Kotaku In Action subreddit — where Reddit’s GamerGaters mostly hang out — so it must be true.

How the totalitarian regime dictatorship of forcing social justice and politically correctness is all about forcing guilt onto us in every situation

 

The post linked to INCONTROVERTIBLE PROOF of this terrible SJW totalitarian regime dictatorship: a picture of some dude holding up a parody of a “I need feminism because … ” sign designed to show just what mean, mean meanies those feminists really are.

Totalitarianism in action
Totalitarianism in action

I’m pretty sure that every red-blooded heterosexual man knows just what he’s getting at here!

I mean, if some hot babe walks by me, and I, as a thoughtful and considerate man, offer her a nice compliment on her appearance by, say, yelling out “hey, titty girl, show me your titties” while making kissy sounds with my mouth, the feminists are all like, “why the hell did you do that, what’s wrong with you, you living piece of crap.”

You see how they get you with the guilt?

BUT, ok, so some other babe walks by, and maybe she’s not really my type, and I think to myself, well, I’m not going to make the mistake of complimenting her on her titties and get yelled at, especially since her titties are nothing to write home about.

But, you know, I don’t want to be rude and simply ignore her, so I yell out “woah, what’s wrong with your saggy-ass titties, you should get a doctor to look at those cuz I sure don’t want to!”

And so maybe I’ve just saved her life from the breast cancer. But do I get any thanks for it? No.

HEY SJW’S GEORGE ORWELL WOULD BE PROUD OF YOU.

NOTE: This post contains

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GiJoel
GiJoel
5 years ago

Set sarcasm detectors to British.

Scildfreja
Scildfreja
5 years ago

comment image

Tessa
Tessa
5 years ago

I love how they reduce it down to “finding a woman attractive” or “not finding a woman attractive.” Oh no, it’s not how they treat or talk about the women in question. Nah.

weirwoodtreehugger: communist bonobo

Dontcha just love it when misogynists pretend that feminists don’t differentiate between attraction and objection in order to cover up for the fact they themselves can’t understand the difference?

I hope that sentence made some sense.

I’ve just never heard a feminist say that it’s misogynist and objectifying to find a woman attractive. The men who complain about meanie pants feminists not allowing them to heterosexual are usually the types of men who are incapable of talking about women without comparing them or their body parts to food products or non-human animals.

Policy of Madness
Policy of Madness
5 years ago

if i find a woman attractive i am sexually objectifying her

Hey, genius. How the fuck does anyone know that you find a particular woman attractive? Are you, perhaps, volunteering your bonerfeels to people who haven’t asked about them???

but if i don’t find her attractive i am a shallow man that only cares about looks

Again, why are you volunteering your bonerfeels about any given woman? That’s the only way anyone would know that you don’t find someone attractive!

As usual, these super-STEM minds hear the criticism but fail to understand that the solution is to stop sharing their boner with everyone they meet. They just can’t grasp, at all, that their boner is not something everyone needs to know about at all times; if I don’t want to hear about your boner when it’s up and I don’t want to hear about it when it’s down, maybe the commonality is that I don’t want to hear about it.

epitome of incomprehensibility

This made me laugh! But exactly.

I’ve gotten both kinds of rude comments before, about being ugly and about being hot (well, just my rear end being hot – apparently the rest of me exists at more moderate temperatures) and BOTH are equally unwanted and annoying. I don’t mind if people think I’m dazzlingly beautiful or horribly ugly or somewhere in between, but it’s not really something I need to be told by strangers, okay?

/end rant

numerobis
numerobis
5 years ago

epitome: ACTUALLY, let me explain, it’s because those men see hotness and not-hotness and their STEM minds start daydreaming about how this means you are literally fuel for a perpetual motion heat engine, if only they can figure out how to harness you. Totally not objectifying, just thinking of you as an object.

Paradoxical Intention - Resident Cheeseburger Slut

Glenn, is that you?

Lkeke35
Lkeke35
5 years ago

Yeah, that’s pretty much their non-self-aware logic. Yeah.

@epitomy: Yeah I’ve gotten that too. Some parts of my body are very hot while others apparently seem to be quite temperate. I still don’t understand the purpose of strange men announcing that aloud, though.

Diptych
Diptych
5 years ago

Maxwell’s Demon as applied to body-policing and harassment?

Bina
5 years ago

Yeah, Sign Dude…you need feminism to remind you that women are human beings, and not just sets of looks which are either appealing or not-appealing to you (which is such boring-ass binary-think anyhow).

And now, you may consider yourself duly reminded, by feminism.

Tschüß!

Bryce
Bryce
5 years ago

Maybe learn what words mean before making a meaningless statement? Objectification is the process of talking about or acting towards a person in a way that ignores their humanity. It’s not an inherent part of sexual attraction, even attraction that’s primarily physical.

Women can in theory sexually objectify men, and probably do in private conversation, but it’s much rarer for women to make unsolicited and intrusive comments about men’s anatomy or general attractiveness out in public.

NickNameNick
NickNameNick
5 years ago

Um, yeah, I don’t think women dislike being complimented for their looks – it’s just when you’re hooting, hollering, and yelling “SHOW YOUR TITS!!!” like a cretinous knuckle-dragger who may as well be a caveman.

Also: yes, you can keep yourself from ogling women, or fondling them, or being sexually aggressive. Because plenty of men do it every single day and aren’t bitter assholes about it – ’cause they’re decent human beings…

NickNameNick
NickNameNick
5 years ago

@Bryce:

Maybe learn what words mean before making a meaningless statement?

Maybe you need to learn reading comprehension before completely misunderstanding a statement?

Objectification is the process of talking about or acting towards a person in a way that ignores their humanity. It’s not an inherent part of sexual attraction, even attraction that’s primarily physical.

Yes, and

Women can in theory sexually objectify men, and probably do in private conversation, but it’s much rarer for women to make unsolicited and intrusive comments about men’s anatomy or general attractiveness out in public.

Ah, there we go with missing the point and adding some false equivalence on top of that!

You do realize the post is specifically about objectifying women publically, right, because that is far more prevalent than the opposite? You do realize that no one, including feminists, are trying to control private conversations? That the issue isn’t about men or women talking about what they find attractive to other men or women when having personal conversations?

No, of course you don’t. If you’re not being willfully obtuse – you’re being disingenuous. You and every other troll that continually comes to this site and act like they read anything here, when you really don’t and just want to repeat talking points ad nauseam…

varalys the dark
5 years ago

I’m a lesbian and I have to admit, I often ogle. But I have the good grace to do it surreptiously so the object of my ogling is unaware and not made uncomfortable and of course I’d never shout something like “hey sugar tits! Nice rack!”

mrex
mrex
5 years ago

LOL, David this post is too funny.

Honestly, guys do suffer from some sexual objectification, you see it when these guys complain that women insist that men should be tall, or muscular, or whatever. It is far less clear cut for guys then women, but it’s still waiting just under the surface.

I’m bisexual, and I really like to look, but feel like I’m constantly gawking at women in the media. As much as I really like gawking at men, men just aren’t put in the situation of always being “flirty” for the benefit of the viewers. They’re not put into the position of being offered up on a plate for consumption.

Men always assume that they would enjoy being objectified, but that’s because men usually take the active role when flirting. When it comes down to being pieces of meat; of being too skinny, too short, too fat, too poor, too whatever, men fucking hate it. They hate the passive role so much that they go online to bitch about feminism turning men into “pussies”, and make up some BS about women’s “natural roles” because they feel themselves scratching too close to understanding how women feel when objectified.

Bryce
Bryce
5 years ago

Maybe you need to learn reading comprehension before completely misunderstanding a statement?

That was rhetorical question directed at the individual in the photo , not anyone here in comments.

You do realize the post is specifically about objectifying women publically, right, because that is far more prevalent than the opposite? You do realize that no one, including feminists, are trying to control private conversations?

Yes I realize that, and I think you’ve misread my post there, Hoss. It wasn’t drawing equivalence but making a distinction between socially acceptable and unacceptable situations within which to comment on another’s appearance.

mrex
mrex
5 years ago

@Nick

“Um, yeah, I don’t think women dislike being complimented for their looks”

Speaking as a woman, and speaking broadly and generally, women do generally hate most compliments based on looks, thanks to their many bad past experiences. Complimenting her clothes, or saying that she “looks good”, is really about as far as I ever go. 🙂

katz
5 years ago

Um, yeah, I don’t think women dislike being complimented for their looks – it’s just when you’re hooting, hollering, and yelling “SHOW YOUR TITS!!!” like a cretinous knuckle-dragger who may as well be a caveman.

I wouldn’t want a rando to compliment me on my looks no matter how classy they were being. If it’s my hairstyle or my clothes or whatever, that’s OK because that relates to my personality and my choices, but “Hey, I just wanted to let you know where you fall on an arbitrary scale of societal judgment based on traits you can’t control” isn’t something I want to hear even if I’m being rated high.

Cerberus
Cerberus
5 years ago

weirwoodtreehugger-

I’m 90% sure it’s an intentional obfuscation. They know what they are doing is dehumanizing to women, because that’s the point, but if they hide it behind just being attracted then people handwave it away. So it’s just a matter of expanding the definition of “just being attracted” until it covers literally any action one might do to a woman.

Sort of like how anti-choice activists label every contraceptive method controlled by women as an “abortion” or “like an abortion” or like how anti-trans activists are careful to hide behind just being super concerned about “privacy” when called out on their anti-trans shit.

kupo
kupo
5 years ago

@Nick
I also do not enjoy compliments on my looks. Just the other day a coworker “complimented” me by saying the view was nice from his seat directly across from me in a conference room. When I ignored it, he added, “that was a compliment.” No, dude, it was inappropriate and turned me from a member of your team with skills and contributions and important things to share in this meeting to being no more important than the plant. Just something pleasant to look at.

dust bunny
dust bunny
5 years ago

@ NickNameNick

Um, yeah, I don’t think women dislike being complimented for their looks – it’s just when you’re hooting, hollering, and yelling “SHOW YOUR TITS!!!” like a cretinous knuckle-dragger who may as well be a caveman.

Actually I’d prefer not to have my looks commented on at all by people who aren’t close and trusted. It’s just a private and personal matter. I get self conscious and really don’t need to be reminded everyone is constantly evaluating my worth as a human by how well I meet their expectations when it comes to my looks.

Also I’m closeted nonbinary, and when people comment on my looks they tend to do so with the assumption that I will be happy to be told how much of a woman I am.

It’s all kinds of hurtful and can ruin my day even when meant well.

A small class of un-sexist appearance-related compliments exists, but people never seem to go for them.

GenJones
GenJones
5 years ago

Seconding, it is obnoxious and intrusive as all hell when some random schmuck wants to volunteer his boner-rating of you or expects you to humor their personal preferences. We don’t need to know whether or not you’re happy in your pants, nor is it any concern of ours to keep you happy. Please keep your apparently constant inner sex monologues to yourselves, weirdos.

Flughed Flones
5 years ago

How bout this?

Until we, as feminists, can rid our own websites of ridiculous misogynistic clickbait ads… We should tone it down a little bit?

I love this blog, but it seems ridiculous when I come on here and see fat-shaming, booby looking, “top 10 times hot chicks have been caught in public” ads.

If we have to indulge the advertisers with that crap in order to get our message out… We’re no better than any of the idiots we make fun of.

Nikki the Bluth Wannabe
Nikki the Bluth Wannabe
5 years ago

@Nick
Whether or not I like being complimented on my looks depends on several factors: what I’m wearing, how my hair turned out, how well I did my makeup, whether or not I’m feeling self-conscious about my size that day (it can be a bit of a confidence boost if I am), but mostly the complimenter’s demeanor (if they make crude sexual comments or otherwise give off creeper vibes, I don’t like the compliment) and what mood I’m in. It’s a complicated formula.
That said, enough women dislike it (such as the fellow Mammotheers who said so above) that “when in doubt, don’t” is usually the safest policy.

Jamesworkshop
Jamesworkshop
5 years ago

Guess what geniuses, objectification doesn’t require you to find someone attractive, it merely reflects the reduction of someone’s status to an object.

It can be observed when men aggressively berate a woman for not showing interest in them, if that woman in question is considered by that man to be so un-hot, that they don’t have any right to turn him down.

Men can easily still feel that women have to cater to their demands socially and interpersonally, no matter what any individual woman looks like.

msexceptiontotherule
msexceptiontotherule
5 years ago

Ok everyone, you’re getting it all wrong! Of COURSE women dress and wear makeup for the sole purpose of attracting men! And YES all women love compliments about their looks, ESPECIALLY if it’s “Show us yer tits!” and “WHOOO-EEE would I love to get a piece of that ass!”

Women need to start being honest about the fact that they truly love being treated like a sexual-services-on-demand machine, and that everything they do in life from cradle to grave is for male attention and to be attractive to men.

*This has been a message sponsored by: SARCASM, and brought to you by…Katie.

Moocow
5 years ago

So a dude who categorizes every woman he meets as ‘hot or not’ is wondering why he gets criticized for objectifying women and being shallow?

Someone needs to teach him how cause and effect work.

Axecalibur
Axecalibur
5 years ago

Ooh, look. A KiA post that has nothing to do with Kotaku, games, journalism, games journalism, or the of ethics of the aforementioned. Oh, but I’m sure that’s a rare occurrence

if I don’t find her attractive, I am a shallow man, who only cares about looks

You don’t only care about looks. And yet, people discussing how you, and those like you, discuss looks is so oppressive as to be considered dictatorial. Not really proving your case, buddy

@Nick
This… this went well
http://www.reactiongifs.com/r/grreat.gif

OoglyBoggles
OoglyBoggles
5 years ago

@Moocow
Causality is a marxist feminist conspiracy to force innocent men into being under peril of retroactive false rape allegations.

Kat
Kat
5 years ago

Even though I’m a woman, I don’t ordinarily compliment a woman on her looks unless I know her well. It can be a touchy subject! I might say that a color she’s wearing is pretty or some such. I don’t usually say much beyond that.

The exception to my own rule is when a woman tells me she’s happily pregnant. Then I tell her she looks great. And she always does.

Lukas Xavier
Lukas Xavier
5 years ago

I think it’s less about how exactly you phrase it (“hey sugar-tits” could conceivably be a compliment, in the context of a certain established relationship) and more about whether you care about the effect on the recipient.

Expressing your (even favorable) opinion about someone is not the same a giving them a compliment. A compliment is supposed to be about making the recipient feel good. If your focus isn’t on that, you’re not giving a compliment, you’re just waving your opinion around.

If your feelings are more important to you than the feelings of the person you’re “complimenting”, then you’re simply not giving a compliment. Rather, you’re using them as a prop to make yourself feel good. That’s literal objectification; viewing someone as a means to an end, instead of as a human being with feelings and worth.

As a result, sometimes the best way to compliment someone is to simply recognize that they’re not into it and to silently communicate: “I respect you enough to keep my opinions to myself.”

Mortarius
Mortarius
5 years ago

Not being able to harass strangers is OPPRESSION

Kat
Kat
5 years ago

@Lukas Xavier
You summed it up so well!

Sometimes a “compliment” is actually a power trip.

If your focus isn’t on making the other person feel good, you’re just waving your “opinion” around.

Imaginary Petal
Imaginary Petal
5 years ago

I’ll compliment my wife on her looks. And I’ll say to my sister-in-law that she looks great when she’s spent hours prepping for some special event, because I know she’ll appreciate it. Other than that, NO. Even if you’re interested in someone, it’s not a good idea to start off with random compliments on looks. Hell, even if it’s in a club/pickup environment it’s just unnecessary. If you’re trying to get laid with someone, it’s implied that you at least don’t mind their looks.

I remember being out with a (female) friend once, and she got a compliment from a random guy saying “you have a beautiful face”. The rest of the night, and the next day, she was bothered by this comment because 1) she didn’t want people to focus on her looks, and 2) she thought it implied the rest of her body wasn’t any good. It’s just a fact that you never know how those compliments will land with the recipient, so keep the bonerfeelz to yourself.

Also, this video might be relevant. It’s long, but I loved it.

Argle Bargle (formerly Carr)
Argle Bargle (formerly Carr)
5 years ago

Ugh, really? They can still find women attractive, but yelling”HEY, NICE TITS, COME SIT ON MY FACE” at full volume in a busy street is not really a civilised way to show how much you like that woman.

I had a friend comment on my breasts one time. Well, it was more like every one time every 2-3 minutes , but who’s counting. After the 15th time he was staring at my chest and going ”Mmmm, titties” I asked him politely to stop, because it was bothering me. And instead of being a decent human being who would stop making me feel uncomfortable, he spent 30 minutes trying to convince me why I shouldn’t be uncomfortable and that I wasn’t really uncomfortable, that I actually liked his comments. When I lost my temper and told him to fuck off, he acted like these chucklefucks and went all ”Woah, you are really aggressive, why? You must be on your period.”

Truly, men are oppressed by us evil women because we asked them to not do something that bothered us. I don’t think even kindergarteners would throw such a fit if you told one of them to stop pinching you, because you didn’t like it.

Playonwords
Playonwords
5 years ago

There are times when common phrases used by MRAs can be used, but:

… there is only one time that “nice rack” should be used and that is if you are an inquisitor complementing another inquisitor;

… similarly a bird feeder that is frequented Parus major is the only reason to shout “Great Tits;”

… informing a baker of an error in the bread making allows you to say “tight buns;”

Diptych
Diptych
5 years ago

In short, if you have to explain to someone that “it’s a compliment!”, and it’s not in the context of translating a document from a language they’re unfamiliar with (“what does ‘is toigh leam do brèid’ mean?”), you might want to stop and think about what you’re doing.

Imaginary Petal
Imaginary Petal
5 years ago

I want to ask for advice on something loosely related to this thread. I know, I ask for advice very often. Sorry. :/

What’s the proper way to deal with comments on your looks when you’re a teacher and the person making the comment is a student? In my case, I present as male and the students are women. (This is not meant to be a brag post, because fuck knows this does not happen to me very often.)

At my volunteer work last week, I was helping a high school student (probably 17-18 years old) with her homework. After we were done she said I have a very beautiful nose, and that she had been looking at it all day. (I feel like I should put in a ton of disclaimers here. Age of consent is 15. I’m not actually a paid teacher who can decide her grades. I don’t actually think she’s flirting with me. She’s way too young for me to have any romantic or sexual interest in her. I’m also happily married and monogamous. Etc.)

I’ve had some other jokey flirty comments made at me as a teacher before. For example, I remember a female student asking if I was married. I said yes, and then she said “dammit” and everybody laughed. Not a serious comment, I’m sure, but what’s the best way to deal with this sort of thing?

These things don’t offend me, since it’s not something that happens all the time, and the situations have never felt remotely threatening or creepy. But on a professional level I worry that it will come across as if I’m inviting such comments if I just say “well, thanks”.

I’d love to hear some advice on this. How should I act if this were to ever happen again?

Kat
Kat
5 years ago

@IP
I’ve found that this works like a charm:

Laugh (so you’re acknowledging the other person).

Say in a kind, light tone, “Moving on . . .” (so you’re moving on).

Then don’t look back.

Kat
Kat
5 years ago

@David Futrelle
I just wanted to point out that the TrendyW website is not bad, from what I’ve seen. (I usually hate, hate, hate the “Around the Web” type of websites.) I’ve read a few of their articles. Their first language is clearly not English but they have a nice tone.

tricylist
tricylist
5 years ago

Not that I’ve ever been in that position, but I think I’d be tempted to use a good natured *roll eyes* type response.

Eg – *roll eyes* – “yes, very nice, but keep the flirting for your friends” or similar.

Mish
Mish
5 years ago

@Lukas Xavier – as Kat said already, that is ELOQUENT. Thanks for expressing the point so beautifully 🙂

weirwoodtreehugger: communist bonobo

A Big Bang Theory rerun was on in the background while we were about to have dinner last. The topic was a magazine article about sexy scientists that Bernadette was going to be in. Amy objected it, pointing out that such a story would not be written about male scientists. Bernadette’s response was something along the lines of “no one wants to see that!” I have to imagine that episode was written by a man because it’s hard to imagine that line of reasoning coming from a woman. Objectification is so pervasive that even straight female characters on sitcoms engage in it. It’s like men know intellectually that many women find men sexually attractive, but they can’t truly conceive of it. That’s how ingrained it is in our culture that women are the sexual class.

It really is a good test to differentiate attraction to versus objectification of women to gender flip. If you see a photo of a woman on all fours in short shorts and a cropped top with her back arched, butt in the air and her mouth opened, that would be pretty humorous if it was a man. Not sexy.

It works for things people say too. If a compliment you want to give is something you wouldn’t say to a man, it’s not a compliment, it’s objectification.

bluecat
bluecat
5 years ago

Mr Bluecat and I compliment each other on looks from time to time. I have a couple of friends whose photos on Facebook I have occasionally written stuff like “looking good!” on, too.

As Mr B and I are both somewhat bi we sometimes comment to each other that such and such an actor is fanciable, usually when watching a DVD together (we agree about Idris Elba and Helen Mirren, we disagree about Robert Webb…)

And… er… that’s it!

Nobody else in the universe knows whether or not we find them attractive.

Because how would they?

Jamesworkshop
Jamesworkshop
5 years ago

@weirwoodtreehugger: communist bonobo

A Big Bang Theory rerun was on in the background while we were about to have dinner last. The topic was a magazine article about sexy scientists that Bernadette was going to be in. Amy objected it, pointing out that such a story would not be written about male scientists.

When I saw that episode it brought to mind seeing “Hottest women in music” awards/features/articles, from outlets that never promote the bands albums or tours, but can suddenly remember them for things other than musical talent or their contributions to their respective genres.

The point in the show about male scientists should really have been about the fact that male scientists are widely represented in those publications anyway, the question then being, would those “sexy” women scientists be profiled at any other point in time, for their actual work.

Why does being sexy determine which women will/won’t get the opportunity to raise their professional profile.

Even if they did a piece on sexy male scientists, it wouldn’t matter anyway because this wouldn’t be creating a two-tiered system, where sexy men are more valued and take the rare opportunities away from other men, not so blessed in the looks department.

Amber
Amber
5 years ago

I was told by a troll that there should be more rape to make feminist statistics real.

“So I have encouraged rape to make statistics true on behalf of the feminist bullshit movement.” I’ve blocked them now, but like, WHAT THE HELL? WHAT THE HELL? WHAT THE HELL?

epitome of incomprehensibility

@numerobis – D’oh, that’s my problem. I wasn’t thinking scientifically . 🙂

@Imaginary Petal – For a comment like the nose comment, I’d probably say something joking that wouldn’t hurt their feelings, like, “Thanks, I worked hard on it!” (of course it would depend on tone and context) and for the comment in class, it probably doesn’t need a response (laugh and move on, as Kat said).

Okay, I admit the nose comment struck me as funny! But I understand the concern, especially around minors. Two of my in-person tutoring students are teenage boys, and I’m careful not to say things that might sound inappropriate. Not that I’d try to flirt with my adult students either, that’s not what they’re there for, but I mean I’m more careful in my language (not calling attention to their appearance or mine, not using “swear” words, etc.).

Blackrising
Blackrising
5 years ago

I love how these guys completely forget that there are people out there who are attracted to women and manage to find some of them attractive (and some of them not so attractive) WITHOUT getting villified by these evil evil feminists!

Because guess what, I can feel an attraction to a woman and not act like a douchebag about it and/or expect them to immediatly drop their panties and offer me sex! (I know, it must be a difficult concept for them.)

If I walk along a street and see an attractive woman, I think to myself ‘golly gee, she sure is pretty’ and keep going. If I walk along a street and see a woman that I personally don’t find attractive, I think to myself ‘golly gee, she sure is not my type’ and keep going.

Not that difficult, is it?

And why the heck is it so difficult to understand that ‘hey sugar tits nice rack you have there’ is not a good compliment? If you absolutely have to focus on her looks because you’re just that dazzled, why not go with a simple ‘hey, I like your eyes/hair/smile’?

Why act like a douche and then pretend you’re the victim if someone tells you off? Ugh.

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