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Harriet Tubman $20 bill not going over well with Trump fans, other garbage humans

Get used to this face, Trump fans; you'll be seeing a lot of it
Get used to this face, Trump fans; you’ll be seeing a lot of it

It’s too bad the US Treasury threw a big wet blanket on Trump fans’ celebrations of the Great Orange Hope’s big New York Primary victory yesterday.

Did I say “too bad?” I meant “ah hahaha ha ha ha.”

Anyway, on Twitter the people you would imagine would be most upset by the Harriet Tubman $20 bill are, well, the most upset.

https://twitter.com/DathanScroggs/status/722854409059762182

https://twitter.com/TangosWithBears/status/722823541025075204

 

https://twitter.com/JalynskiL/status/722900932443287556

https://twitter.com/KebabRemovalAct/status/722861754489802752

Apparently libertys sees “freeing slaves” as some sort of crime against humanity. But sees actual crimes against humanity as something worth celebrating.

https://twitter.com/drew_leopard/status/722832010578890752

https://twitter.com/UNOwen7/status/722855942342086657

https://twitter.com/xavierlee_/status/722883578774720514

https://twitter.com/genophilia/status/722886924839464960

https://twitter.com/Ovenkin/status/722843029971664896

https://twitter.com/KaliYugaSurf/status/722893888470421504

https://twitter.com/JohnKuckich/status/722828069325524992

https://twitter.com/occdissent/status/722853565333684225

And then there were those who pulled out the n-word. No, not that n-word. This one:

https://twitter.com/dorklyenlighten/status/722823187273269248

https://twitter.com/UNOwen7/status/722894486204850177

https://twitter.com/PlaceInTheSun2/status/722835227584794624

Don’t worry. There were plenty of people who used the regular n-word as well.

If after all this you want to be reminded just how completely badass Tubman really was, here’s her story, as recounted by a very drunk person.

 

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sevenofmine
sevenofmine
4 years ago

I stopped reading after “Jackson gave indians a new home”.

Stop the planet.
I want off.

Jo
Jo
4 years ago

I know the tweets are vicious and vile, but I like to see them as impotent raging against positive change and (too slow, but still visible) social and political progress. These losers know they’re losing and they want to distract themselves and the world from the fact through offensiveness and button-pushing.

Won’t work, boys. Your fear and misery shines through. You lost. Justice won.

EJ (The Other One)
4 years ago

@sevenofmine:

Stay on the planet, you’re good people. These assholes can leave.

I recommend Gliese 667Cc as a good home for them. We think it’s probably one of the more habitable exoplanets out there, so we don’t need to feel bad about sending them. It’s also a long way away.

Lordcrowstaff
Lordcrowstaff
4 years ago

Basically:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GdNI0_cx22s

Dear racists: enjoy your seconds in the limelight, your era is fading.

Inkswitch
Inkswitch
4 years ago

I love those people who throw “cultural marxism” as a go-to insult without any idea what the term actually means. It’s like the edgier cousin of “political correctness”

Ray of Rays
Ray of Rays
4 years ago

They can rest somewhat easy though, since Jackson will be on the back of the bill. So the pro-genocide, racist shitpiston will still be on the $20.

I take mild comfort at the irony of that asshole being pictorially represented on something that is decidedly not the “hard money” he favored when fighting the bank.

They ought to put a snippet of the McCulloch v. Maryland decision on the back of the bill, too, just to pound the posthumous nails in further.

Steampunked
Steampunked
4 years ago

I’d put my money on the Indians comment being edgelord crowing – the way they do ‘base mom’ and talk about how Trump will give them all anime waifus.

It’s a sort of shitty humour on ‘I am SO edgy ooooh yesss!’

Because nothing says edgy like mocking the powerless by being both rude and absurd. The point isn’t that it’s factually abominable. The joke us that they don’t care and are showing it loudly so everyone can go ‘Ooohhh! BAM!” in their dreams.

I could be wrong but it reeks of 4chan smug shittery.

This shit is why I do some Internets autopsy whenever we’re going in to interview people. I’ve had the absolute delight in caning folks out of a job with us due to them being racist. I can’t describe the joy other than that first moment when they say “Because of that?!”

And we get to smile “Based on the way you talk about our clients, you’re just too much of a risk to hire. We have a reputation.”

(For the curious, our selection criteria notes that we are committed to social equity, so IDK why some of these folks still apply. Maybe its to give us justice rushes?)

Chiomara
Chiomara
4 years ago

I didnt know her story nor that there would be a black woman on a dollar Bill nor that there was a 20 dollars bill.
Congratulations, americans! This is truly awesome and a huge step for you and for the entire world ^^
I am really happy a black and female hero of slavery is finally being paid such homage. Here in my country some slaves from the resistance, like Zumbi, are mentioned in the history classes, but only males. You gave me an idea, I will search for females!
You said in the south of the US its taught that the war was about economy and not slavery. Here, gladly slavery is painted with a very negative light, but teachers have an habit of saying its partially fault of the africans (they sold the slaves) and that Princess Isabel “freed” them for her own will. So a lot of white people don’t feel bad about slavery at all, cause black people sold the slaves and white people eventually “freed” them. Its just so disgusting.

This post made me both glad and really sad, because… I honestly can not understand… How could we collectively do such cruel things, and how can some of us still do it. I do not understand what goes on in the brain of someone who sees an individual of the same species being tortured or used as object as something normal. With animals its already monstruous, but PEOPLE?!
And then when I remember I was sometimes casually racist/LGBTphobic/etc when I was a child because I was raised like this… I understand I am not too different from that either. Would I own slaves if I was born back then? I certainly wouldnt watch a whipping, but would I let it happen, like I let so many things happen behind my back because I am not brave or decent enough to do anything? What makes us better or different from those damn neonazis? Better education? Better parents? Could I, could we be all monsters in the right conditions? Or are we monsters already and don’t notice? We try to be good, but is that enough?
All I know is every time neo nazis or slavery are mentioned I am afraid of humans… Especially white humans. Especially myself.

And I also know is that it was not fair, that it takes guts and a wonderful brain to think and act differently, and that I am glad we continue to move on as a species. And that I am sorry. I am really sorry for what I did or could do, and for what I don’t do too.

Eh. I think this last drink gave me a pseudo-philosopher mood. Excuse the rant.

Banananana dakry
Banananana dakry
4 years ago

Today has already been a shitty day, and these pasty ego-constipated empathy-dead little shitbags aren’t helping.

So m’ just going to think of all the writhing they’ll do over the fact a black lady will be on US currency. And for vindictiveness’s sake the kind of straightforward justice the Librarian would levy on these mucus scrapings from a diseased warthog’s anus. Never anger someone with the strength of three humans, even if he does look like an overstuffed red leather cushion. He’s also smarter than them, but that goes without saying.

Also George Takei is millions of times more awesome than they can ever hope to be.

Snowberry
Snowberry
4 years ago

I realized much later that my earlier post on this thread was really patchy and unfocused. What I meant to say was more along the lines of “Thank you very much for reminding me, of one of the handful of historical events that I wish I could scrub from my memory, in the most obnoxiously flippant manner possible.”

And yeah, I’d love to believe that the present wailing and gnashing of teeth over the ongoing cultural shift just the dying throes of the… um… Skeksis Emperor? Something evil anyway, that was the best metaphor I could come up with to finish the sentence. But my experiences with history have left me a wee bit pessimistic on that point. Way too early to declare victory.

Also, some sentiments are just too awful to laugh off or laugh at. Even if the trolly mctrollersons who express them are too stupid to understand why. This one exceeds my personal limits.

Kat
Kat
4 years ago

@Jo

I know the tweets are vicious and vile, but I like to see them as impotent raging against positive change and (too slow, but still visible) social and political progress. These losers know they’re losing and they want to distract themselves and the world from the fact through offensiveness and button-pushing.

Yes, yes, yes! I consider every unfunny tweet from every one of these people who hate everyone (including themselves) to be a sign that social justice is winning. The haters feel threatened. They feel cornered. So they lash out.

I’m going with Martin Luther King, Jr. (quoting Theodore Parker, who was an abolitionist, a Unitarian minister, and a Transcendentalist thinker) on this issue:

The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.

rugbyyogi
rugbyyogi
4 years ago

Well, I’m quite pleased because Harriet Tubman was a childhood hero of mine and it’s about damn time we have an actual real woman on the currency, but also quite disappointed that Andrew Jackson is getting booted because Ol’ Hickory is my favourite anti-hero president. I’ve been to his conception place in Northern Ireland, both his birthplaces (NC and SC claim him) and of course, his home outside of Nashville. Fightin’ and duelin’ and runnin’ off with another man’s wife and just generally bein’ ornery and plus the Battle of New Orleans song is just grand.

Argle Bargle (formerly Carr)
Argle Bargle (formerly Carr)
4 years ago

Okay, I had heard the name Harriet Tubman, but I never knew exactly what she did (my country’s history curriculum never really focused on anything non-European or WW-y), can anybody recommend a book about her or something?

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

@ Kat

Johnny Cash

Johnny Cash was the first American to learn of the death of Stalin.

(As someone mentioned cultural Marxism I’m going to pretend that was on topic)

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.

Some days though my optimism fails and I fear it may be asymptotic.

snork maiden
4 years ago

Would it be in poor taste to ask if the new $20 will soon only be worth $14?

Seriously though, this awesome America. I learned a little bit about Harriet Tubman in primary school (in the UK), so I knew enough to recognize the name when the news came out. However the only detail that stuck in my mind was how she once evaded capture by the confederates on a train by sitting there calmly with a book in front of her, they knew Tubman was illiterate so went right by her. So, so cool.

mockingbird
mockingbird
4 years ago

@Argle Bargle: Who Was Harriet Tubman 😉
Kidding.
That’s the only one I’ve read, though, because I did so with my kids.

This isn’t a book, but here’s a quick biography:
http://www.biography.com/people/harriet-tubman-9511430

mockingbird
mockingbird
4 years ago

@rugbyyogi – While I’ve got to admit that general orneriness is a trait dear to my heart, the Trail of Tears has soured me on Jackson.

Dr. NicolaLuna, Epic Slut
Dr. NicolaLuna, Epic Slut
4 years ago

I’d never heard of Harriet Tubman til now, I’m in the UK and my school never covered it. Just spent some time reading about her and I’m so glad I did – she’s amazing.

It made me think of that “open letter to Rey” guy and how he thinks that female protagonists in movies make women act tough. There were badass women way before movies were even a thing. That guy wishes he was as brave as Harriet Tubman!

mockingbird
mockingbird
4 years ago

@Chiomara –

You said in the south of the US its taught that the war was about economy and not slavery. Here, gladly slavery is painted with a very negative light, but teachers have an habit of saying its partially fault of the africans (they sold the slaves) and that Princess Isabel “freed” them for her own will. So a lot of white people don’t feel bad about slavery at all, cause black people sold the slaves and white people eventually “freed” them. Its just so disgusting.

As someone who grew up where there was a Lee/Jackson Day rather than an MLK Day, I can tell you that that’s much the same narrative. “The Africans sold each other!” And, yes, it’s also taught that the war was about economy and sovereignty rather than slavery and that slavery was proving to be financially unsustainable.

I think that there was some truth to those motivations (apologies if I’m wading into what’s already a fraught conversation – I’m working my way backwards through the comments while drinking coffee), at least as far as then-contemporary perceptions go – the North wasn’t brimming with abolitionists and there were plenty in the South who would rather have seen slavery quietly “go away”. But the fact remains that, at the time, the South’s agricultural economy was dependent upon slavery, and (contrary to what its apologists might like to claim) it was a form of slavery that relied upon dehumanization and complete subjugation; rape, “forced pairing”, and the destruction of family units; and the inculcation of racist thought, action, and policy into every aspect of life and culture.

If you’re not familiar with him, I also highly recommend looking up Frederick Douglass.

mockingbird
mockingbird
4 years ago

I ran out of time to edit.

I meant to add after “every aspect of life and culture”:

And the conflict centered around the ability to continue on with that.

mockingbird
mockingbird
4 years ago

@Ray of Rays –

I take mild comfort at the irony of that asshole being pictorially represented on something that is decidedly not the “hard money” he favored when fighting the bank.

They ought to put a snippet of the McCulloch v. Maryland decision on the back of the bill, too, just to pound the posthumous nails in further.

HA!

(Reference to others not familiar: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/supremecourt/antebellum/landmark_mcculloch.html )

mockingbird
mockingbird
4 years ago

@pitshade –

Just got a text that said “Re: Harriet Tubman, make sure you stay hydrated today. Gonna be a lot of salty crackers on Twitter.”

I love it 😀

But now I’m torn.

Part of me wants to see someone with PS talent make a Harriet Tubman salty meme , but part of me wonders if that’s properly respectful of her legacy.

But it’s still in my head – Harriet Tubman, her stern face broken with a faint smile while she enjoys an ice pop, her eyes cast towards the viewer to say, “All these flavors – and you choose to be salty.”

I think she’d appreciate mocking these salty assholes.

Buttercup Q. Skullpants
Buttercup Q. Skullpants
4 years ago

I’m waiting for someone to complain that this ruins the plot of the $20 bill. “My money lied to me! Women don’t have the physical strength to gaze out stoically from among serial numbers, pyramids, and weird Masonic shit! That’s just way too unbelievable!”

@mockingbird – I grew up on the opposite side of the Mason-Dixon line, and my high school history teacher used to refer sarcastically to the “War of Northern Aggression”. I think there was maybe one paragraph about Harriet Tubman in our history book, but there should have been a lot more. She served in the army as a nurse, soldier, and spy, and led an expedition of 700 men during the Civil War. So much for the “women never fight in the military” trope.

DS
DS
4 years ago

Gotta love the not-so-subtle dig on trans people: dimes (worth 10-cents) identifying as quarters (worth 25). Ah, Internet hatred, truly your creativity knows no bounds, you zany, madcap critter.

Playonwords
Playonwords
4 years ago

Don’t forget that the UK has the great social reformer Elizabeth Fry on the £5

bluecat
bluecat
4 years ago

Great news about Harriet Tubman – well done you USians! I’d read a little about her because of references among American feminist writers. If it encourages more people to learn about her it can only be a good thing. So, yay!

It’s even more pleasing that so many truly terrible people are in a state of enraged displeasure over it. Which is basically what they deserve – that and stepping on legos in perpetuity.

But, yeah: “stealing property” when that “property” is yourself… do these shiteweasels think the same about people who escape from kidnappers, for instance?

Because apart from the legality of slavery when it was legal, is there a difference?

I believe there was a legal case in England when a slave brought here from the West Indies sued for freedom, and a judge ruled he could no more sue his owner than a table could, unless that’s an urban myth.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

@ playonwords

There seems to be a weird correlation between chocolate manufacturers (Fry, Rowntree, Cadbury) and social reform activism. Anyone know why that is?

Huggbees
Huggbees
4 years ago

The second the news broke I know that we were going to have racist twits throwing a rage fit. I heard that Elenor Roosevelt and Susan B. Anthony was on the lsit for names to be on the new 20. These twits would’ve complained if any of these three women were on the twenty because misandry and crap. As for the news itself good riddance Jackson we don’t need to have a mass murdurer not to mention one of the worst Presidents in history on our currency.

bluecat
bluecat
4 years ago

@ Alan – I think both things were connected with Quakerism. Social justice, and alternatives to booze and to the pubs.

The Cadburys built a model housing estate for the employees at Bourneville with no pubs in it – a lot of manufacturers used to pay workers in pubs which they also owned. Not surprisingly the whole wage packet rarely made it home.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

@ Bluecat

The case is Somerset -v- Stewart (1772) but the quote isn’t what it seems.

The actual judgment in the case was in favour of the slave, but some commentators made arguments on the lines you mention.

(It’s a bit like when equal marriage rulings come down and you get people saying stuff like ‘it’s Adam and Eve, not Adam and Steve’. Not part of the actual case, just the background chatter)

The decision in Somerset was used as an argument for American idependence by the rebel factions.

http://www.commonlii.org/int/cases/EngR/1772/57.pdf

bluecat
bluecat
4 years ago

Ahah! Thanks Alan… somehow I thought you’d know!

Interesting how the whole concept of slavery developed and was justified over the period – I’m reading a lot from the 17th century when it was beginning to be defined, in the Atlantic world at any rate, as a racial category rather than a political one (ie; whoever you happen to have defeated recently) or a religious one. They couldn’t seem to make up their minds whether you could enslave people who weren’t Christians so long as you didn’t convert them – which became inconvenient – or that you ought to enslave people in order to make them into Christians…

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

@ bluecat

There was load of Rowntree housing not far from where I lived in London. There’s a similar ‘model village’ (in the ideal, not tiny, sense) called Saltaire near Bradford. That was built by a Victorian philanthropist with the magnificent name of Titus Salt for his mill workers. It’s very popular with arty types now. That didn’t have a pub either but luckily for my arty mates you don’t have to walk too far to find one now.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

@ bluecat

The case is important in jurisprudence terms because it illustrated the schism between a strict legalistic approach (is this just a contract/property/international law matter?) and a more ideological way of thinking (hence all the references to philosophers like Locke).

Ironically it’s more relevant to US law where the distinction between ‘strict constructionists’ and ‘purposive interpretation’ is a big issue with a Supreme Court that’s a lot more political than ours.

Msexceptiontotherule
Msexceptiontotherule
4 years ago

I’ve been watching a show called (the) Underground, as in the Underground Railroad, many of the scenes are hard to watch because of the brutality on screen real and implied (not shown). The good in humanity comes through in moments depicting interactions between children. This weeks episode had a scene I’m not sure how to feel about – white woman caring for a runaways child and bathing her as she would with her own (but shes barren) does what she must to have the man searching for runaways keep her secret (the child in her home) ends in a bath herself with the child there trying to comfort her…

History is full of unpleasant, repugnant, and horrific. But there’s also honor, compassion, and striving to make things better. Learning about all the rotten stuff and not letting it be swept under the rug of time or disguised is kind of important in preventing a repeat.

princess sunny burn
princess sunny burn
4 years ago

So Harriet Tubman was a “criminal” for breaking unjust laws by helping people escape slavery?

Gosh, these guys must really hate the founding fathers. And I’m sure they’d never join or support the Tea Party, since it’s named after a criminal act of terrorism. Lord knows these upstanding citizens are committed to following the letter of the law at all times, which is why none of them ever support things like ignoring anti-discrimination laws or joining illegal anti-government militias.

epitome of incomprehensibility

That’s awesome! I mean, I know it’s symbolic, and posthumous honours are a bit late, but it’s cool that Tubman will get this very public and widespread recognition.

…And the tweets quoted are racist and horrible, but I did laugh at the one calling Tubman fat. If you want to object to someone’s political activism, you call them a criminal, a terrorist, and….fat?!

Karalora
Karalora
4 years ago

If Tubman is unworthy to be on the currency because what she did was, at that time, illegal…better axe all the Founding Fathers too.

ETA: Ninja’ed by princess sunny burn! It must have been a snark whose time had come.

Boogerghost
Boogerghost
4 years ago

HARRIET TUBMAN FOR THE WINNNNNNNN

I literally squeaked with rage at all the people calling her a “criminal.”

@Paradoxical Intention My thoughts exactly re: April 20th birthdays. Having one myself, I do like to spread the word about Takei. 🙂

HawkerHurricane
HawkerHurricane
4 years ago

If the racists/misogynists insist on putting a white male on the currency, I suggest we use John Brown.

In fact, I’m going to write my congresscritter and recommend putting Harriet Tubman on the front of the $20, and placing John Brown on the back (vice Andy Jackson).

Falconer
Falconer
4 years ago

“my n—– Adolf Hitler” makes me just … sit here and stare into space. That’s so stunningly ignorant that I can’t even muster the energy for a face-palm.

PerfectBlue
PerfectBlue
4 years ago

Chrissle is a national fucking treasure. No one better to deliver that drunk history moment. <3

Hu's On First
Hu's On First
4 years ago

Say, David, have you read about this? I wouldn’t be surprised if Rodrigo Duterte ends up supplanting Donald Trump as the redpillers’ favorite political figure.

Michael P
Michael P
4 years ago

I grew up in Oklahoma. We got both Tubman and the Trail of Tears in elementary school. The narrative was “slavery was bad, Harriet Tubman was a hero” and “the Trail of Tears was very sad, a lot of Indians died and all of them lost their homes.” They did kinda gloss over how, eventually, white people took away Indian Territory too, and it wasn’t until high school that I realized what a scumfuck Jackson was. But still, I don’t know where the yutzes featured in the piece are getting their information about either.

Falconer
Falconer
4 years ago

Let’s see … Jackson founded the Democratic Party, dismantled the Second National Bank and hated paper money, fit the Battle of Nawlins after the war was over, basically conquered Florida for us when the Seminole rose up against Spain, hated Henry Clay, was responsible for the Trail of Tears, and get this … opposed the secession of South Carolina over the Tariff of Abominations and threatened military force against any state that tried to secede. Not to mention he held hundreds of slaves, and killed a man in a duel.

Sure, he risked his life many times over his military career, but Tubman was at risk for her entire life, and liberated people, to boot, while Jackson mostly oppressed people.

@Friendly Neighborhood Dragon Arthur:

Likewise, if I recall correctly, you can find Charles Darwin on printed notes in England. Can we put a scientist on our money and get rid of the “In God We Trust”? “E Pluribus Unum” is just so much stronger of a phrase to go by.

Latin? Too Papist. /sarcasm

Ray of Rays
Ray of Rays
4 years ago

@ Buttercup Q. Skullpants

I think there was maybe one paragraph about Harriet Tubman in our history book, but there should have been a lot more. She served in the army as a nurse, soldier, and spy, and led an expedition of 700 men during the Civil War. So much for the “women never fight in the military” trope.

I know, right? Even in California, we studied her, but pretty much only regarding her involvement in the Underground Railroad. I never knew about her involvement with the US army before now.

lightcastle
lightcastle
4 years ago

Regarding Tubman biographies, I’ve heard the book associated with this site is good, as is the one called Road to Freedom.

rugbyyogi
rugbyyogi
4 years ago

@mockingbird – yes, yes, I know, BUT it was at least as much about certain tribes siding with the Brits (and fair enough because they had a non-expansionist policy – which of course they would have broken later, but in the meantime a sensible alliance) as it was about racism. He hated the English more than he hated the Cherokee.

However, I’ve just read that he’s staying on the back, so the $20 should be karmically neutral. He’d be quite pissed that he’s on the back of some paper money with a black woman on the front. That makes it pretty sweet, too.

FrickleFrackle
FrickleFrackle
4 years ago

I heard about Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglas as a kid and I live in Texas, then again I’ve always been somewhat interested in history and the stories it tells.

Nameless
Nameless
4 years ago

Woot, I am always happy to see a drunk history video, and I am so happy Tubman is going on the twenty~

I grew up with so many books on her, starting with those stupid valuetales books (I say stupid because the value of helping really undersells Tubman and Columbus doesn’t deserve to be considered to have any value, yet a very fictionalized version of him gets the value of curiosity in that series). I always drew rings on her fingers in the pictures ’cause little four-year old me thought she deserved something nice. Now that I’m thinking of it, I wonder if my mom still has all my books from when I was a kid, they were great. I was so grateful to my mom for making sure I grew up knowing about and looking up to women like Sojourner Truth and Frida Kahlo, and I attribute my obsession with history to all the biographies and books on suffragettes and influential women to her.

I can’t hear the hateful chorus over how happy I am that one of my biggest heroes is getting to be represented on a bill. It’s more than just symbolic, in my mind, if it introduces such an important and inspiring figure to new generations of children. It’s all another stride forward and another stride away from the hateful world these bigoted people promote. As far as I’m concerned, they’re screaming their hateful speech into a void that has no interest in them.