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Open thread for discussion of Jian Ghomeshi acquittal

Jian Ghomeshi
Jian Ghomeshi

Today, as CBCNews reports:

Jian Ghomeshi has been acquitted on four counts of sexual assault and one count of choking by an Ontario Court judge who says the “deceptive and manipulative” evidence of the complainants raised a reasonable doubt in the guilt of the former CBC Radio host.

Share your thoughts below. This thread is a NO TROLL/NO MRA etc thread.

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guest
4 years ago

An example of what that post about ‘too’ was talking about immediately popped up:

http://www.alternet.org/election-2016/fox-news-cuts-away-hillary-clintons-speech-about-isil-complain-shes-too-calm

It’s particularly galling to me that the people laying down the law about how victims ‘should’ and ‘must’ behave in order to be given any credibility are the same people that never have been, may never be, and in some cases couldn’t possibly be in the same situation. And there are certainly plenty of stories out there along the lines of ‘I always thought that in this situation I’d do x, and then suddenly I found myself in it and to my surprise I did y instead.’ A personal less-upsetting and less-damaging example–when I’d talked with a few people who lived in haunted houses I said things like ‘how come you didn’t do x?’ or ‘if it were me I’d have done y’…and then when my own house was haunted I behaved entirely differently to what I’d told these people I would have/they should have done.

Makroth
Makroth
4 years ago

I have nothing to add so here’s some cats getting annoyed by puppies.

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occasional reader
occasional reader
4 years ago

Damn.
Do they need to torture the victim in order to guarantee the veracity of the victim testimony ? Are we back in the Dark Ages or Renaissance ?

I do not have read the verdict. Are they saying that the testimony of the victim is all false ? Or that just because they can not prove it is all true, they dismiss it by default to all false ? I was thinking that, in justice, if you can not prove at a moment that the testimony is true or false, you have to report the judgement until more proofs allow to decide.

runsinbackground
runsinbackground
4 years ago

You know, this just reinforces my belief that reporting rape and sexual assault to the police is a waste of time, unless you don’t have any family or friends who are capable of taking matters into their own hands. Vigilante justice is the first and only true justice!

Michael P
Michael P
4 years ago

Vigilante justice isn’t justice, it’s vengeance.

That said, the fact that it’s often more readily available to victims of sex crimes than actual justice is pretty fucking terrible.

Niall
Niall
4 years ago

This is so like the U.K.’s Jimmy Saville scandal… A national Broadcaster (BBC), a superstar “youth” radio/tv presenter who is a known freak… http://www.macleans.ca/news/canada/jian-ghomeshi-how-he-got-away-with-it/

RosieLa
RosieLa
4 years ago

@Dr NicolaLuna, @Mish
Thanks. I’m so glad that it’s a long weekend so that I don’t need to face anybody until Sunday.
I feel like my spirit is dying, again.

Auntie Alias
Auntie Alias
4 years ago

@Kat

Hello and thank you! It’s nice to see you, too.

Yesterday was a mixed bag. I was deadly calm for a few hours after learning of the verdict then later on something pressed my buttons and I was in a state of anxiety for the rest of the day. I wish I had noticed what set me off. I hadn’t experienced that anxiety for a few years; I recognize it as a response to a sexual assault I experienced about 18 years ago. I didn’t know then what I know now about the shitty way women are treated by the justice system but I decided not to go to the police after giving it careful thought and discussing it with others. I haven’t regretted that decision and now the asshole is dead so that’s the end of that story apart from occasional anxiety/trigger/whatever.

Yesterday I was engaging with a lot of commenters at my local (Canadian) newspaper’s website about the trial outcome. The commentariat there is heavily populated with right-wing, bigoted, anti-feminist men yet, surprisingly, a significant proportion of them said they believed Ghomeshi probably did what he was accused of but supported the judge’s verdict. The one who stands out to me the most as a probable MRA was eminently reasonable in his comments, much to my surprise. That made me feel a little bit hopeful.

Victorious Parasol
Victorious Parasol
4 years ago

It gets depressing to see all the victim-blaming on the internet. I’ve seen way too many assertions that the victims “must” have lied and collaborated on their testimony with each other. Plus there’s that age-old assertion that being accused of rape is far more devastating than being a victim of rape. Yeah.

I can’t write any more about this right now. I’m too sad and angry about how the charming powerful people keep getting away with doing whatever they want.

Ohlmann
Ohlmann
4 years ago

@runsinbackground : vigilante victim is arguably even worse than what happened here. Not that what happened was something good or even only a bit bad. But vigilante “justice” just end up with dead innocents and a false sense of achievement from thoses who did it.

sunnysombrera
sunnysombrera
4 years ago

Vigilante “justice” is what leads to murdered abortion doctors. As much as the legal system is in tatters it’s best to stick with that route.

Moocow
4 years ago

@FriendlyFyre

That explains so much. I’ve seen a lot of those arguments (e.g. “She still kept in contact with him, that means she wasn’t raped”), but I never knew how to address them.

Thanks for the enlightening read.

Viscaria
Viscaria
4 years ago

I haven’t really been able to grapple with this verdict or its Canadian and global implications yet. There’s just this pain in my chest.

Survivors: I stand with you. I believe you.

Ohlmann
Ohlmann
4 years ago

That remind me of the questionable content of today.

http://questionablecontent.net/view.php?comic=3185

It’s not on thoses horrible verdict, but it nonetheless drive the point home we can’t sit on your ass saying it will be better in twenty year (or do vigilante justice). We actually ahve to spread the awareness. and fight for this to be recognized.

dreemr
dreemr
4 years ago

As for the verdict: like far too much of the news lately, I reacted with a sigh and something between disgust and resignation. And if I dwell on it too much I will make myself crazy. (Even Prozac may have its limits, after all.)

You have very accurately described my typical reaction as well (although in my case it’s Celexa that has its limits).

Anon
Anon
4 years ago

Full disclosure, I was once put in this position when I was abducted by a sexual predator and had to take matters into my own hands, so I’ve pondered this a lot since then. I have to agree with others here, it is a very problematic proposition.

Let’s think this through. Just for the sake of argument let’s assume that the target party is as guilty as sin. Vigilantism still puts a lot of pressure and risk onto the victim, and basically would force them to become like violent predators themselves.

1. A sexual predator will act again if they have the opportunity, and if they are able to recover from a beating they will simply be better prepared next time. If one is going to take the law into their own hands, there is no halfway about it.

One of the things that I’ve agonized over since this incident was that by not taking this person’s life that probably the only lesson this person learned was to bring a gun next time, making it all but impossible for the next person to defend themselves and escape like I did. It is a very difficult thing to grapple with, to regret not being a murderer. As a self preservation mechanism, part of my PTSD complex has been to erode this inhibition against killing and prime me to be far more aggressive. As a day-to-day thing, this is a nightmare to deal with and I wouldn’t wish it on anyone else.

2. Vigilantism can make the person seeking justice subject to prosecution themselves, especially if the retribution was premeditated after the fact. Enlisting the help of others to target a person is bringing in a lot of loose ends and even friends and family of rape victims tend not to believe them, and will more likely than not result in a charge of conspiracy, so in this route victim would feel compelled to act alone and not tell anyone about their assault in order to hide possible motive.

But in order to make sure you could effectively act in self defense in the moment you would basically have to be armed to the teeth to act at any given time. Then the problem is, how is it not going to appear premeditated if one came prepared?

I highly doubt that MRA’s who say the victim is responsible for their own safety would actually be comfortable if it became the norm for women to go on dates equipped like serial killers and would probably scream for their blood if a rapist (I’m sorry, alleged rapist) was killed.

3. So let’s say you’ve done the deed and have a dead body on your hands. Now what? Do you call the police and put yourself in the hands of the courts, or do you hide it and try to get on with your life? Is this going to result in pressuring women to have contingency plans to get rid of evidence?

While it sounds all great and empowering on the surface, when you think it through it really is no better than victim blaming, puts the wronged person in a huge dilemma and would ask them to take on more trauma. Acts of violence are just as damaging to the aggressor as they are to the victim, perhaps even moreso for the worse. Trust me on that.

Leda Atomica
Leda Atomica
4 years ago

Sorry to go kind off OT but I witnessed something very common and upsetting last night.

My dog has an upset stomach so he woke me up at 3:35 am. I took him out and the streets were dead silent. After a while I saw a couple (?) and the guy was physically blocking the woman’s way. It looked awkward, but then it turned violent. He started grabbing and pulling her while she was trying to get away from him. He even had her in what looked like a choke hold. She started screaming “I’m going home! I’m going home!”
I had red rage, having been in that situation myself. The guy was small and scrawny so according to my quick calculations I was The Hulk and the dog was a direwolf and this guy was breakfast. I walked up to them and asked the woman if she was ok. She couldn’t have been older than 19. She said “HE is not ok!” and then this guy noticed me (his back had been turned to me). I said to him “Howabout you didn’t manhandle people?” and he just gave me this innocuous “I didn’t do nuffin” look. Then the woman said “That’s exactly what I told him!”

They then stumbled on, both heavily drunk but I followed the situation from a distance. When he thought he was out of my sight he started grabbing her again in a violent way. Luckily I saw her stop at an apartment block and heard her call someone to come open the door. Even luckier, person who came was a big dude so I knew I could go home peacefully.

This sort of thing has happened to me, in front of MANY people and no one stepped up. No one. That’s why my head was filled with so much rage. Do guys not understand we are physically threatened in this world? That this shit is not ok, it’s scary as hell? If a person wants to go home, they are going home. I can’t imagine this arsehole choke-holding his bros if they decide to go home to sleep. Why is it ok to do to a woman?

Gahh. Still, sorry for the offtopic but just needed to vent.

WeirwoodTreeHugger
WeirwoodTreeHugger
4 years ago

Anon,
You make some great points. I’m sorry you had to go through that, but thank you for sharing your story here.

WeirwoodTreeHugger
WeirwoodTreeHugger
4 years ago

On a bit of a lighter note, but still on the vigilante justice subject; I’ve been pondering whether or not the movie Hard Candy is a feminist horror movie.

It is about a 14 year old girl taking vengeance on an internet predator. He thinks he’s lured her over to his home, but it’s really the other way around.

The perv is a handsome and well known photographer. He’s not the stereotype of a rapist/child molester normally found in the media. It’s more reflective of real life. There’s absolutely no victim blaming or slut shaming towards his victims. His desire to prey on girls is never once portrayed as understandable. There’s not a trace of rape culture in the writing, and that is rare.

These are the points for it being a feminist movie. And that’s the way I lean.

But, there’s a but! The vigilantism is portrayed in a 100% positive light. Without giving too much away for those who haven’t seen it yet, our protagonist goes to extremes. There isn’t really any gore, but there is a scene where something gory happens just off screen. Her mission is not just to kill him. It’s to humiliate and torture him, and then kill him. The one flaw in the movie IMO is that it never really grapples with the morality of vigilante justice.

To me, violence isn’t feminist. So that’s a point against it being a feminist.

Ultimately, I come down on the side of calling it feminist because it’s a horror movie. Horror movies tend to have violence and I don’t think a whole genre should be off limits to feminist filmmakers.

Anyone have thoughts? Or am I just teal deering into the wind. I know there are more important things than old movies being discussed here.

Victorious Parasol
Victorious Parasol
4 years ago

@ WwTH

I’ve seen Hard Candy, and I don’t know that I saw Haley’s actions as being portrayed in a 100% positive light. I saw it as a story of two predators: a man who preys on children and a girl (who, as Haley says, may not even be 14) who preys on molesters. The movie does have some great feminists points, such as pointing out that the adult always has the responsibility to maintain boundaries when a child is trying to cross them, or that just because a girl has a “woman’s body” doesn’t mean she’s ready to do all the things a legal adult can do. But I can’t see Haley as a feminist hero. I see her as the kind of character who is a response to rape culture.

Leda Atomica
Leda Atomica
4 years ago

@WWTH

I’ve not been calling Hard Candy a feminist movie because of the reasons you brought up. It’s a great film but it’s more like a “revenge horror” and it lacks feminist narrative. Black Rock is a symbolic feminist movie, with women trying to survive men. I mean, these are army guys with guns looking to kill women who are naked, trying to protect themselves with sticks.

Hard Candy is kind of like violent vindication over sexual abuse, but it is a bit of a “guilty pleasure” watch more than it is a genuinely feminist movie.

Victorious Parasol
Victorious Parasol
4 years ago

@ Leda

Totally OT here, but is that a Black Books icon I see next to your name?

Leda Atomica
Leda Atomica
4 years ago

@VP

It totally is Mr. Black.

Victorious Parasol
Victorious Parasol
4 years ago

@ Leda

Who is on the phone and has no time for customers who buy books to match the couch.

hope_riser
hope_riser
4 years ago

I have a lot of experience in this case as a former victim and now, advocate for abused women and their children. When I left my husband after 3 days of forcible confinement and a nearly miraculous escape with my life in tact, I begged police to drop the charges against him. I pleaded with the detective in charge of my case to understand that it was all my fault and he didn’t deserve to go to prison.

For as long as I live I will never forget the detective telling me “You have no idea how brainwashed you are right now. When you wake up out of this in six months or so, you’re going to be so angry with yourself.” He couldn’t know how right he was and its been ten years now and I’m still mad. I don’t know who that woman was – begging for her career criminal ex husband who had beaten her, threatened her, stolen every penny, and every shred of self-confidence and dignity she had. I can’t believe that was me. Even now, I barely recognize that strong, feminist me became a victim of domestic violence pleading for a man who had done this countless times before and would go on to escape more charges against another woman who also begged police not to charge him. To this day, he has been arrested 8 times – 6 on violent charges against women partners but convicted 0 times. He is likely beating a woman as I type this….I frequently text with two other women he assaulted and if he is ever in another court, I would be worried to have those texts used to support a defence that we colluded to have him charged by yet another woman. We have, in jest and morbid fantasy, plotted many schemes that could be badly interpreted and why we often insert “joke” to avoid any question that we have done more than joke in text for therapeutic reasons.

I totally understand how and why the women behaved as they did. I can’t believe we are still assessing the validity of the crime based on events that happen in its wake – events that were it not for the crime, would have ever occurred in the first place.

Having said that, I also have some small measure of hope. The conversations that are happening on social media are sometimes horrificly negative toward women but, there are so many more people talking about how the judge was an idiot or how just because he isn’t legally guilty doesn’t mean he isn’t guilty of what he stood accused of…We are further discussing consent and victim blaming and raising the social consciousness of the masses in some small ways that indicate real progress to me. This blog and these comments truly give me hope that the tide is turning…..painfully slowly…..but just a few short years ago, this case never would have seen the light of day. People tried to protect Jian since day one and though he will not suffer legally or go off to jail, he is in no way exonerated.

weirwoodtreehugger
4 years ago

I really liked Black Rock. It was a pleasant surprise! I’ve seen a shit ton of survival horror and I thought it was going to be just another generic entry into that subgenre, but it actually has some substance.

Leda Atomica
Leda Atomica
4 years ago

@ WWTH

It’s also such misandry and doing womaning wrong, because it had a feeeemale director. Katie Aselton, who also kicks ass as one of the lead characters, really made the movie look as cold and threatening as the world can be for women. I had no expectations going in, but was very pleasantly surprised, not only as a feminist but as a horror fan. It’s a good watch even if you don’t appreciate the social commentary. But I personally appreciated the substance.

@VP

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Victorious Parasol
Victorious Parasol
4 years ago

@ Leda

A sentiment I’ve felt on occasion.

Fishy Goat
Fishy Goat
4 years ago

Another thoughtful bit of discussion:

The Ghomeshi Verdict: Re-imagining How Future Sexual Assault Cases Are Heard
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/naomi-sayers/the-ghomeshi-verdict-reim_b_9544430.html?utm_hp_ref=crime&ir=Crime

FriendlyFyre
FriendlyFyre
4 years ago

@NicolaLuna

I’m glad you got something out of my post, and I’m sorry for what that person did to you. The idea that survivors immediately shrink in fear or stop associating their rapist is such a pernicious myth and all you need to do is look at how rape and survivors are portrayed in media (visceral, traumatizing, rapists as inhuman and survivors as clear victims) to understand WHY people (especially men) completely can’t comprehend it.

But just like domestic abuse, the ability to get away from an abuser is constrained by fear, and our own ability to rationalize someone’s behavior.

Partially i think it’s because when we say “rape” or rapist” we are conditioned to act with revulsion because it’s a concrete statement, but the act is sometimes so subtle and often seems to come out of nowhere from a person we like and trust that survivors don’t feel right calling it what it really is (Not to mention how much we are conditioned to forgive people who hurt us). And that means people simply refuse to believe that a person who was hurt in that way wouldn’t immediately feel it and run away from the person who did it…

@Moocow

Same to you, I feel like this is landmark case for understanding victim-blaming’s effect on rape verdicts. For instance, look at all the people defending the verdict who insist that the women MUST have been trying to smear Ghomeshi’s reputation, when in reality the judge CLEARLY stated that their ruling didn’t mean he didn’t hurt them, just that (in his opinion, and fuck him) there was “reasonable doubt”

“Reasonable doubt” for rape cases is such a loaded term because most of the public STILL doesn’t understand how ingrained the “perfect victim” mindset is…

Bina
4 years ago

@rick:

I stopped following this case cause I knew he’d be exonerated. I recently saw an article about the victims “colluding” with each other. Not sure if that’s what worked to get this verdict, but its indicative of how rape is framed depending on its social context. In the West, unless its the maniac-in-an-alleyway trope, rape does not exist. We are too “civilized” for that, and of course, civilized here is translated as white, European, straight and male. So women who accuse men of rape in this context are “falsely accusing” because rape does not exist in the civilized western world. Whereas, elsewhere, it is part of “their culture”. The Cologne attacks are a perfect example of this dichotomy. Those rapes were “real” because they were committed by non-white, “foreign” men, outsiders on the edge of civilization. Cause its always them, and never us… cue the rightist blathering… and on and on and on…

My thoughts exactly. And that’s why I quit following the trial too, for the most part. I’m not usually an “Oh god, I can’t look” person, but…when they started whacking the complainants, I literally could not bring myself to sit through it. It was getting too much like seeing a bear-baiting session in progress.

It was also too much of a reminder that when a man is supposedly tried for assaulting a woman, it’s really the woman who is on trial. HE wasn’t even called on to testify in his own so-called defence. It was just his lawyer, ripping one woman after another apart and bamboozling the judge (who has a history of letting men off even when there’s DNA evidence to convict!) Where is the justice in that? Won’t somebody think about the fucking MENZ?

Father Goose
Father Goose
4 years ago

Not sure if its been posted yet but Lucy has done an interview about the trial.

http://www.chatelaine.com/news/exclusive-lucy-decoutere-on-the-ghomeshi-disaster/

katz
4 years ago

Who is on the phone and has no time for customers who buy books to match the couch.

But how does he feel about thick leather-bound editions of Yeats?

(I do not have the fortitude to talk about the case or even look up all the gory details, sorry.)

Moocow
4 years ago

@FriendlyFyre

It reminds me a lot of the logical fallacies I’ve seen involving conspiracy theorists. Just because a small piece of logic is technically true (jet fuel can’t melt steel beams!) doesn’t mean it has any bearing on the matter at hands (The melting point of steel beams is irrelevant. Anyone with a basic understanding of mechanical/civil engineering can explain how buckling happens and how the heat of burning jet fuel is enough to cause the the steel beams to buckle, which is exactly what happened)

Naturally, this gets exacerbated when discussing sexual assault since it’s a lot harder to disprove faulty logic involving human behavior.

Bina
4 years ago

Partially i think it’s because when we say “rape” or rapist” we are conditioned to act with revulsion because it’s a concrete statement, but the act is sometimes so subtle and often seems to come out of nowhere from a person we like and trust that survivors don’t feel right calling it what it really is (Not to mention how much we are conditioned to forgive people who hurt us). And that means people simply refuse to believe that a person who was hurt in that way wouldn’t immediately feel it and run away from the person who did it…

And sometimes, it’s so subtle that there’s not even any kind of “hurt” involved. Whenever I was assaulted, it was always by guys I liked as a friend. And it never left so much as a mark on me, physically anyway.

Once, it was a guy who used to give me rides home from the local writers’ group meeting — an older guy, married. After he’d sprung his unwanted sexual intentions on me, I avoided him and caught rides home with someone more trustworthy. What clinches it as assault in my mind, and not a mere “misunderstanding” between a naïve young thing (I was 20 and virginal) and the poor old well-intentioned coot she’d inadvertently “led on”, was the fact that he waited until I was buckled into a moving car before he made his move. I couldn’t escape. He had me right where he wanted me. I was SO disgusted, and not just with him. I blamed myself for never having seen it coming.

And once, there was a friend I went out with one night, and made out with on the floor beforehand. Good-looking guy. Kind of fancied him, until. I never saw him again after that; it was him doing the avoiding, not me, which cements in my mind the understanding that he knew what he was doing, and he knew it was wrong. That was the part that I now recognize as his guilt admitting itself. That he knew he’d raped me. That maybe he’d done it to others before me, too, because he seemed just a bit too smooth, too practiced, to have just been totally spontaneous about wanting a BJ and not bothering to ask first.

It took me years to even just call these experiences “assault” or “sexual assault”, because there’d been no overt violence involved, and I wasn’t hurt or traumatized in any way. I didn’t get PTSD or blackouts, didn’t engage in any unusual behavior at all. I was still entirely myself, before, during and after. I was more stunned than anything else, that they would just do that. The only thing that was hurt was my trust in them, and my understanding that yes, I too am now a date-rape (and sexual-assault) statistic — one of the vast unknown number of ones that never press charges, because everybody blames us, and nobody wants to count us; we’re a waste of police time and resources, as we’re often given to know. We don’t fit the “true victim profile”, because we’re not cowering in corners wetting ourselves. I don’t even like to see myself as one, because “victim” is practically a cussword in these oh-so-libertarian times. And because like so many others, I bought into the idea that there are “right” and “wrong” ways of being a victim. And because the word carries such connotations of abuse and bruises, and I have none to speak of, because the assault was less an abuse of my body than it was of my trust. But there it is.

And even after more than 20 years, I’m still having trouble saying it of myself. Because to say it is to admit that this rape-culture thing really IS a thing, and it’s more endemic than even I, a long-time feminist, could ever have thought. And that fucking scares me, even more than the guys who assaulted me did.

epitome of incomprehensibility

His emails and phone messages/texts to the complainants? Inadmissible – although THEIRS are dredged up to be analyzed and cited as “proof” that consensual contact continued after the assault, therefore the assault was clearly consensual. (Notable leap of logic, that, equating an individual’s desire that a relationship continue in some form with her desire for every occurrence within the relationship to have occurred, and even to recur in the future.)

(Quote from @dlouwe) – Exactly. And that I find really frustrating: the way the defense framed it as just some angry exes ganging up on poor JG – how he couldn’t have been guilty of hitting or choking the women since they (or at least one of them) continued a relationship with him and it wasn’t likely that someone abused could act that way, etc. etc. (I don’t like that the Montreal paper The Gazette continues to reprint articles from Christie Blatchford – perhaps I shouldn’t target one journalist like that, but she seems to be all about this sort of victim blaming. She had an article today that the editor headed “Verdict Only One Possible” and I didn’t want to even look at it before going to work because I knew it’d make me angry.) It’s like ignoring all that’s been studied about abusive relationships ever before. The “perfect victim” myth is a silencing tactic, like other people here said.

Nikki the Bluth Wannabe
Nikki the Bluth Wannabe
4 years ago

Matchstick, Refinery29 also has a decent overview of the events of the case.
http://www.refinery29.com/2016/02/102715/jian-ghomeshi-sex-assault-trial

Nikki the Bluth Wannabe
Nikki the Bluth Wannabe
4 years ago

This used to be a double post, but now it’s just a false alarm. Thought the Hyperlink Mammoth had beaten me, but I’ve recovered the original post.
OT: anyone got plans for the Easter weekend? My dad’s family all canceled on the usual meal-can anyone else who’s Stateside recommend a place for us to get a quick, light lunch before Easter dinner with my mom’s family?

Nikki the Bluth Wannabe
Nikki the Bluth Wannabe
4 years ago

Cases like this are why I have a note saved in the Notepad function of my phone reminding myself that if I get raped, which means any form of unwanted genital contact, I should call the police and preserve the evidence until I can get a rape kit and a police interview, which would (hopefully) lay ground for me to make a criminal accusation against the rapist.
I don’t intend to suggest that any other reaction is wrong-everyone handles traumatic events differently and I can understand why other people act differently in the wake of the same situation. It’s just the only reaction I can imagine where I leave the situation with the sense that I did everything I could to fight back, self-advocate, and make the rapist pay for what they (but statistically more likely, he) did. Personally, I’d rather fight with every possible means available to me, even if nobody else believes me and seemingly the whole world’s against me, than hold back due to the severe societal pressure and end up wishing I’d done more.
It’s late and my emotions are running high-if you think I’ve said any of this in a problematic way, please tell me and I’ll address your concerns tomorrow or later in the week, when I’m thinking more clearly.

Vajassa Faldocci - Feminist Attorney
Vajassa Faldocci - Feminist Attorney
4 years ago

The patriarchal court system likes to acquit rapists when there is no evidence, in order to built it I urge sisters to add more accusations following the legal advice of attorneys specialised in allegations against men

Makroth
Makroth
4 years ago

I’ll bite. Credentials, please, Vajassa.

Scented Fucking Hard Chairs
Scented Fucking Hard Chairs
4 years ago

That is the worst gotcha I’ve ever seen. And I was here for Pelagic.

opposablethumbs
opposablethumbs
4 years ago

VF-FA you sound awfully like a fairytale creature that lives under a bridge to me.

There was of course plenty of evidence – and the court recognised that the acts of violence had taken place just as described.

Scented Fucking Hard Chairs
Scented Fucking Hard Chairs
4 years ago

Google says “Vajassa Faldocci” is a feMRA who plays a straw feminist character for her buddies on AVFM. Just in case the everything didn’t give it away.

Unfortunately for her, this is a troll-free thread.

WeirwoodTreeHugger
WeirwoodTreeHugger
4 years ago

Yeah, that was waaaaaay too obvious.

Policy of Madness
Policy of Madness
4 years ago

Just for my curiosity, are there any bona fide feminist groups who legit refer to each other/other women as “sisters” in a non-ironic way?

Mish
Mish
4 years ago

Just saw Vajassa’s comment this morning when I got up – ermergerd, that’s just awful. I’m torn between hilarity, and offense that she thinks people here are actually that silly.
Effort: D-
Content: D-

@Policy of Madness – none that I can think of! I’d get some very strange looks indeed if I referred to women in my groups as ‘sister’ 😀

Anon Ymous
Anon Ymous
4 years ago

My wife and I were asked about ten years ago (when we were both very young and not yet married) if we were “sisters”. The person asking looked left-wing/hippie/(possibly lesbian) enough to me that I responded “No, we’re partners”‘ to which she replied with a laugh “That’s what I meant, dearies! Sapphic sisters!”

That’s the only time “sister” has ever been used to me as meaning “member of a group” unironically.

I think.

:p

History Nerd
History Nerd
4 years ago

I think a lot of sex criminals are aware of how the legal system works and how memory can be complicated and take advantage of that. It seems like Ghomeshi groomed people by developing a fake “nice guy” persona and promising people career advancement. Though I guess he couldn’t resist the urge to be an abusive asshole to his staff on Q.