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“Flat Earth” more popular than MRA, MGTOW and PUA combined, Google Trends suggests

Do we live in a giant terrarium?
Do we live in a giant terrarium?

So yesterday I fell into an internet hole watching “flat earth” videos on YouTube.

In case you haven’t heard, the ancient idea that the world we live on is flat, stationary, and perhaps the center of the universe has been having a bizarre revival lately.

The topic jumped off the internet and into the mainstream media last month when rapper/producer B.O.B. started Tweeting about his newfound faith in flatness, ultimately getting into a sort of rap battle with everyone’s favorite astrophysicist Neal deGrasse Tyson.

It turns out it’s not only B.O.B. who has decided that the globe is a lie. Over the past year, a sort of flat-earth counterculture has blown up online. On Youtube, a small battalion of flat earth “truthers” spread the new gospel to hundreds of thousands of fans in videos that range from the charmingly amateurish to the surprisingly slick.

The new flat earthers don’t just reject the idea of the earth as a spinning ball; they reject the concept of gravity itself (suggesting that things fall to earth simply because they’re denser than air, which, what?), not to mention evolution and pretty much most of modern science.

Many of them see the Bible as a better source of information about the earth than science, and rail against what they see as a vast conspiracy to keep the supposed truth about the flat earth from the public. Naturally, it’s all the fault of the freemasons and the Jews. (It’s telling that B.O.B. is not only a flat earther but also, apparently, a Holocaust denier who referenced the discredited historian David Irving in a dis track aimed at Tyson.)

One of the reasons I’ve been so obsessed with MRAs and other misogynists over the past five years or so is that I think they offer an instructive case study in the cultural and intellectual history of bad ideas, and the subcultures that nurture them. Obviously the flat earthers do as well.

The similarities between the “manosphere” and the flat earthers are considerable, and not just because both groups have found their ideal audiences on Youtube; like their MRA and MGTOW counterparts, popular flat earth Youtubers have tens of thousands of subscribers, and their most popular videos get hundreds of thousands of views.

Members of both subcultures not only have their own interpretations of the world but an array of shared “facts” as well, which they cling to with the misguided arrogance of the fanatical autodidacts they are: MRAs insist that domestic violence “isn’t gendered”; flat earthers insist that there are no direct flights from Australia to South America. (No, really.)

I may return to this topic in more detail later but I thought you’d find the following charts from Google Trends to be of some interest, since they show that the public’s newfound interest in flat earthery has evidently eclipsed its interest in Men’s Rights, MGTOW, and pickup artistry combined.

flat earth1

 

Not only is “flat earth” way more interesting to people than all that manosphere stuff but interest in Men’s Rights, pickup artistry, and MGTOW has been declining. Have they all peaked?

This isn’t a perfect representation of interest in these topics. People searching for “pua” might actually be interested in retired soccer star Víctor Púa; people searching for MRA might be interested in Magnetic Resonance Angiography. Alternately, people interested in any of these topics may have used different terms — though when I searched for ‘men’s rights” there were almost no searches for that term.

Hey, let’s add feminism to the mix.

flat2

D’oh! “Flat Earth” beats feminism, too! But, hey, at least feminism is still doing better than “men’s rights,” and it’s been on an upswing.

Let’s swap out feminism for “gamergate.”

flat3

No surprise it’s been on the decline, but I would have expected a lot more interest at its peak.

Now let’s put all this in perspective.

flatpoop

POOP BEATS EVERYTHING!

But I am a little puzzled by poop’s declining poopularity.

I’m going to keep watching the flat earthers, and will report any interesting findings. If I find an explanation for the poop conundrum I will share that as well.

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Moggie
Moggie
4 years ago

Alan:

Why did the chicken cross the Moebius Loop?

To escape from M. C. Escher. It failed, of course.

Mary Contrary
Mary Contrary
4 years ago

@Vanir85:

Who cares? Six Oscars for Fury Road! The MRAs can cry us a sweet, sweet river! 😀

Imaginary Petal
Imaginary Petal
4 years ago

@EJ, NiOg, chosen_name

I’ve asked the mods and they say to apply through the forums:

http://mc.sitosis.com/forum/

Click “Apply for Membership” and make sure to mention my name.

🙂

Moggie
Moggie
4 years ago

And Spotlight gets Best Picture, with the producer using his speech to issue a challenge to the pope! Who could have seen that happening, just a few years ago?

Buttercup Q. Skullpants
Buttercup Q. Skullpants
4 years ago

Why did Roosh cross the road?

Because the feeeeemales on this side are too degenerate, shorthaired, and picky.

This must be endlessly annoying to conspiracy theorists who happen to be Jewish (I assume such exist).

Heartiste is Jewish.

EJ (The Other One)
4 years ago

@Imaginary Petal:
What’s your name on there, so I can mention you?

occasional reader
occasional reader
4 years ago

Hello.

Yeah, indeed, flat earth is bullshit. Everybody know that earth is banana-shaped !

Have a nice day.

Imaginary Petal
Imaginary Petal
4 years ago

@EJ

Same name as here, but without the blank space.

EJ (The Other One)
EJ (The Other One)
4 years ago

I just applied for membership in your server.

I have also just realised that I forgot to drop your name.

Annoyed at self.

Brony, Social Justice Cenobite

@Catalpa
I think that comic is close to a truth with respect to how I think cognitive enhancements work in autism. There has been an observation that the children of scientists and engineers tend to have a greater incidence of autism. But this has been tricky for me when it comes to bias because my own Tourette’s Syndrome shares many features with autism (like savant syndrome associated sensory hypersensitivity), but are like a “mirror image” of one another in other respects (like the difference between ADD/ADHD or introversion/extroversion). So trying to describe “what autism is” has its limits but I have some ideas I’ve been poking at for years.

The best I can do for an objective hypothesis is that autism comes with advantages in the more objective sensory processes associated with “exteroception”, basically the senses that feed in outside information . An interesting observation related to this is that people with autism are less subject to change blindness (the gorilla on the basketball court experiment).

In my case I think that TS comes with advantages in the more subjective sensory processes associated with “interoception”, basically a “body sense” that also has to do with feelings of “personal/physical status” in a sense that has to do with what we think of as emotional states in a casual use of the term. I think it gives me something of an advantage in objectifying the emotional states of myself and others and in being introceptive (I know why I do what I do).

But that way of looking at it is bullshit at the casual social level because both exteroception and interoception are parts of emotional responses. Research into what emotion is suggests that emotion is like a program being run and feelings of emotion are sensations of the program being run. Emotion has three parts” “primordial emotions” (from a primordial self), “core emotions” (from a core self) and “autobiographical emotions” (from an autobiographical self) (see Antonio Damasio’s “Self Comes to Mind”). I think that TS hypersensitivity is related to primordial emotions, and that autism hypersensitivity is related to core emotions.

This makes the idea of “emotional arguments” or “feelings-based arguments” crap because it’s what the emotions are attached to that is important and gas-lighting is understandable in this context as it’s a means of avoiding what the emotions are attached to by any means necessary.

@ Scented Fucking Hard Chairs, reimalebario
I see the obsession with the Jews as one part cultural meme and one part group/dominance/aggression psychology + projection. At one level the Jews were treated in really shitty ways throughout history and have been a convenient social scapegoat. Keep in mind that you can see the same things I outline below associated with other minority groups, and you can identify similar versions in child bullies in schools. These are general human behaviors that have versions at the individual and group level.
The social meme comes in where every major element in human psychology seems to have individual and group level standard for what “normal” or “example number 1 of X” is. So every country seems to have a family that they socially obsess over as “alpha family”* (royal family in England and other countries, rotating families like the Kardashians in the US…) and I have a feeling that US is probably like a big drama that the rest of the world likes to watch, because you watch the ones on top. The Jews for better or worse are an international scapegoat to blame a nations/peoples troubles on (and in-group social emotions prevent many from looking up the truth).

The projection** comes in where a group that has been aggressively dominant and scans for threats to that dominance imagines others will do what they have done, and “tit for tat morality” suggests to them that the Jews will get treated as they have been treated. So “da joos are everywhere eleventy!1!1” is a reflection of the fact that the dominant social group (whites/Europeans/Arabs in other countries) will imagine that the Jews are up to what they are up to in a competition sense.

The projection has an added benefit in that it tosses a distraction at the general population in that the general population has it’s perception and filters for these behaviors directed away from the dominant social group, and towards a minority group. So the ones doing it are more protected, and the victims of it get attention wrongly (there are definitely versions of this at the childhood bully level) Multiple “benefits” are probably inherent in how evolution maintains things that are bullshit in the long run.

*I don’t think that it’s hard-wired into our psychology (at least not completely), I think that it’s something valuable that society actively tries to preserve.
**I’m not using the term exactly like it is used in psychology, but the operation is functionally similar. I have to admit that my own possession of this social software is what lets me and others see it, and being a white aggressive male gives even more benefits in this area. When you see what you have been a part of it gets pretty stark and you have some choices to make. There are also probably lots of defense mechanisms that lead to others to try to deny the reality.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

@ Brony

There’s an IDF intelligence unit that only recruits people with autism because of their special talents.

https://www.idfblog.com/blog/2014/04/10/autism-idf-meet-soldiers-intelligence-unit-9900/

Saphira
Saphira
4 years ago

Those flights between Australia and South America are real but not actually direct. They stop in Antarctica for the plane changes of people who travel to the inside of the Hollow Earth.

Wait a moment . . . how can the Earth be flat and hollow? There’s a conspiracy here, I just know it!

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

@ saphira

There’s another theory that we actually live on the inside of a sphere and the rest of the universe is tiny and in the middle.

Brony, Social Justice Cenobite

@Alan Robertshaw
I have a copy of that article. I try to collect as many examples as I can of these things and eventually I would like to get into advocacy in these areas. I used to be in Cell and Molecular Biology but the last 6 years have been, complicated. I think that I would have been a better politician or other social organizer and I tried to be a scientist.

ADHD has it’s own benefits but they are more associated with emotionally dynamic situations, “pattern breaking” or “out of the box thinking” and leadership skills (good in a crisis or things involving emotional intensity). Depression has been linked to better judgement of negative qualities that can go out of control in a modern context (society needs to be focusing on bad things that happen more in addition to medicating it, people are depressed for reasons), even schizophrenia patents are immune to some kinds of reasoning bias (it would be good for a population with reasoning bullshit to have people more resistant to it, schizophrenia benefits may be more group-level things).

As for the inheritance aspects, I think that inherited epigenetic predispositions based on ancestor experiences or “mode of life” are a good thing to look at. I can find connections to epigenetics in all of these conditions and there are lots of other things in the DSM-V that I have not looked at.

These are fascinating times. It will be interesting seeing how society deals with having to reinterpret the past based on what we really are.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

@ brony

I don’t know whether it’s true but someone told me that the nuclear industry recruits a lot of people with autism and OCD. I can see the safety implications in that.

dlouwe
dlouwe
4 years ago

Flat Earth (and basically any conspiracy theory) does have quite a bit in common with the manosphere, at least as far as ideation goes. They all rely heavily on producing “just so” explanations to fit their predetermined conclusions, and use some sort of poorly defined controlling group as a scapegoat to make those explanations impossible to actually disprove. The controlling group is always just powerful enough to manipulate any evidence presented by “their side” (e.g. feminism controls academia, thus academic studies are biased) yet never powerful enough to silence those that know the “truth.”

I think one way that they somewhat diverge, and unintuitively what may be the reason for the manosphere’s lack of staying power, is that the manosphere is actually closer to reality. MRAs and the like rely heavily on misusing information; out-of-context quotes, badly interpreted statistics, appropriated terminology, etc. Whereas something like Flat Earth is largely made out of whole cloth; they literally need to dispute basic science and easily observable phenomena. MRAs use poor arguments and will literally never concede a single point, but Flat Earth basically precludes argument entirely. And I feel like this half-a-pinkie-toe in reality gives just enough ground for people with at least an ounce of critical thinking skills to either avoid or eventually eject themselves from the manosphere.

Sprorpro
Sprorpro
4 years ago

Looks like poop *dons shades* is dropping.

Brony, Social Justice Cenobite

@Alan Robertshaw
I can believe it. The research that I use to guide what I read about shows that some advantages only appear in combination with other diagnoses. Enhanced “antisaccade abilities” seem to require TS+ADHD+OCD, while TS alone seems to give advantages to time processing.

None of which relates to adults with these conditions and the advantages associated with struggling with them over one’s whole life. I get the impression that we have to struggle to gain skills and that what look like childhood weaknesses may predict adult strengths.

Additionally each of these conditions also seem to come with various “flavors” of OCD more often than others. TS has aggression/violence/sex/social rule OCDs, ADHD often has a perfectionism OCD…I’m not sure about autism. That is one I have meant to go back to.

Robert
Robert
4 years ago

Thanks to all who corrected my flat earth/geocentricity muddle.

I first read David Icke’s lizard lamentations some years ago. He seems to seriously believe his Theory of Everything, which is actually more disturbing than if he was grifting his followers. If people can have faith in fourth dimensional reptilian people from Alpha Draconis, flat earth is a walk in the park.

Moggie – I think Jewish conspiracy theorists, like most of them*, compartmentalize. You believe firmly in the ideas that fit in your reality tunnel – Federal Reserve is a plot, Iron Mountain was a real leak, FEMA is building camps – and when someone tells you about Denver International Airport or George Washington being secretly replaced by Adam Weishaupt you scoff. “Oh, that’s just ridiculous! There IS a conspiracy, but WE’RE not behind it!”

*Meaning the theorists.

Jenora Feuer
Jenora Feuer
4 years ago

I’ve always wondered: if you’re some kind of super-powerful Illuminati, or Jew, or Jewish Illuminati, and you control the media, the police, the government, all that stuff (and these are some really powerful people!) how comes your incredible network can a) be discovered by some dude in his underwear from his home with his 56k modem and b) all your horses and all your men cannot shut down his spinning-illuminati-disc, lensflare, black-background infowars site?

The best comment I’ve ever heard about this sort of thing (I think it was from the Skeptic’s Dictionary but can’t find it right now) and one that fits perfectly with the rest of the discussion on this site:

Do you know why we know about the original Bavarian Illuminati, and why they got shut down within about fifteen years of their founding?

Because rank-and-file members were using their membership in a Secret Society planning on bringing down the Church and its supported leaders… as pick-up lines to show how important they were.

(For that matter, one of the reasons Weisshaupt formed the Illuminati was because he was too cheap to pay the fees for the Freemasons.)

dlouwe
dlouwe
4 years ago

Because rank-and-file members were using their membership in a Secret Society planning on bringing down the Church and its supported leaders… as pick-up lines to show how important they were.

Pretty clear proof that the current – successful – Illuminati has no men in it. GYNOCRACY.

EJ (The Other One)
EJ (The Other One)
4 years ago

@Jenora Feuer:
That’s amazing. Thank you for that, it made my day.

Newt
Newt
4 years ago

Pop music and long-discredited conspiracy theories… is Chaucer Conspiracy Clown still around to explain this one?

Monkoto
Monkoto
4 years ago

@Alan;

Anecdotally, my reply to that is no. Certainly no more so than other fields I’ve been a part of ( currently working semiconductors ). The nuclear field does not have a large portion of that in it. I spent 12 years in the nuclear industry, serving in R&D, Operations, and finally Instruction. Part of it civilian, part military.

The nuclear field, operations especially, tends to be populated by ‘alpha’ type personalities. In the military it is predominantly populated by smart people but they’re undertrained ( in every sense of that word ), uninterested, and overutilised. A lot of military nukes aren’t there because of interest in the nuclear field, many are pulled into it as a result of test scoring and quotas. It lends itself to a great number of suicides as people break under the unrealistic strains of pressures they create for themselves. Even more die doing stupid shit during their off time. The nuclear community is “old”, has difficulty maintaining new talent, and is one of the “old guard” concerns in science fields.

The only part I would imagine that has more of that spectrum is R&D, which I haven’t been a part of since 2004ish. But when I did R&D – and I’m biased because I was happier and more naive back then – but when I did R&D, the people I worked with were more open and passive in tone and willingness to work with new ideas but still aggressively territorial with their projects. People in R&D were far more… colourful? I’m not really sure how to explain it, so lemme tell you about a guy named Squirrel. I don’t even remember his real name, we all called him Squirrel. Brilliant quantum theorist doctoral student, way above my intellect level for sure. But; he would drop on all fours and chase squirrels if he saw one. It was a latent action, and at first funny but rather quickly horribly embarrassing. How do you even explain that? It’s still hard to believe and I actually experienced it.

The nuclear community is a rather strange place. It is one of the few places where anyone can speak up with less fear of reprisal ( it is not odd to get a challenge to a notion or brief from someone of low rank or stature – which I personally don’t have an issue with, I think this should happen more broadly in terms of how society works but I think the way we do it sometimes isn’t helpful ), but in the operations side this tends to devolve to figurative power matches and who is more right. R&D tends to be more speculative in nature but no less confrontational.

People tend to think of science as a more ‘rational’ field, but humans will human. We are very protective of our ideals and ideas, and as I like to personally say “While humans claim to reach for the unknown, we breed our contempt in the familiarity of our traditions.” The nuclear community is a great example of this in action. And I can say that reflectively; even now, no longer in the community for several years I still flinch / become aggressive at the mention of ‘cold fusion’ even though I know I can’t really do reactor kinetics problems anymore and realistic advances and developments have been made. I’m personally in the “for nuclear waste, for SMR design, for proliferation of GenV breeder modules” camp with a strong nuclear future but I also think that humans aren’t mature enough to actually handle it. Our accidents prove that we refuse to learn from our mistakes and continue to operate research enterprises as capitalist businesses with clear and dangerous results.

IMHO we have a lot of growing up to do, but of course my experiences and opinions are my own and I’m going off on a tangent.

Brony, Social Justice Cenobite

@Monkoto
Thanks for mentioning that. It’s good to get an opinion from someone who has worked there.

@Alan Robertshaw
You might find this interesting. Specialisterne is a job placement service specializing in people with autism.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

@ monkoto & brony

Thank you, that was quite fascinating.

I do some work with a charity that specialises with people on the more severe end of the ASD Spectrum and it’s interesting how some of the service users seem to have particular talents in all sorts of areas.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

@ monkoto & brony

WordPress seems to hate me at the moment so I’ll just have another go at saying thank you!

SCH
SCH
4 years ago

Sure, why not… this in a day and age where we have stepped into space and taking frigging photos of our planet. I suppose “the devil” warps those images in order to make us believe the world is round? Or perhaps it is evil NASA scientists working for the devil and those photos are only CGI? (And damned good CGI back before CGI got good.)

I don’t want to be human anymore. This is embarrassing as an intelligent species; that which clearly resists its own intelligence.

Valentine
Valentine
4 years ago

As someone who is on a ship right now crossing the Pacific I can say with confidence the world is not flat. So far I have been on ships from SA to Europe Europe to aisa and aisa back to SA. All looks pretty round to me. Also mercator charts wouldn’t work if the earth was flat and they do so there’s that as well. Take it from me you won’t ever meey a sailor nowadays who thinks the earth is flat. That bullshit is clearly for the land dwellers and those less travelled. And for what it’s woth (I saw this on tumblr but still) mercator charts are not racist. It’s just the most practical projector for getting a round earth onto a flat piece of paper so you can plot positions on it. Gnomic charts also worl but for some reason it’s easier to plot a lat and long when the graticules are straight and not curved. Strange that *sarcasm* -_-

chesselwitt
chesselwitt
4 years ago

@ Valentine
Is the Mercator map the one that the Society of Cartographers for Social Equality was arguing against on that episode of The West Wing? (For as much as I love that episode, you’d think I could remember the map names.)

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

@ valentine & chesselwitt

We had a discussion about maps, including Mercator v Peters, a while ago. Not sure how you search for things on this site though.

katz
4 years ago

Oh man, are we going to turn this into a map projection geekery thread? I’m a total Good homolosine person, myself. I also think Van der Grinten is stylish but not very practical in most cases.

EJ (The Other One)
EJ (The Other One)
4 years ago

Peters4lyfe, yo.

katz
4 years ago

Peters people, I WILL FIGHT YOU. Maintaining shapes is of paramount importance.

Newt
Newt
4 years ago

(I saw this on tumblr but still) mercator
charts are not racist. It’s just the most practical projector

Mercator is the easiest to explain/implement/demonstrate, but far from practical for a lot of purposes (eg. land use, planning long-distance travel). It minimises areas near the equator and overemphasises temperate regions (and often omits the poles altogether).

I favour the orange-peel projection. No, not like that, you’re peeling it all wrong.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

I think the objection to Mercator is it highlights (and makes bigger) the northern hemisphere at the expense of the southern. You can of course now get southern orientated Mercator maps as any Australian will tell you (although they could probably make do with a sheet of sandpaper).

Geek mode: technically only the original medieval maps with East at the top can be ‘orientated’

bearpelt
bearpelt
4 years ago

Thank you so much, Futrelle, for actually acknowledging that B.O.B. is also an anti-Semitic asshole. Most news just focused on the flat earth thing and apparently didn’t find denying the Holocaust worth mentioning.

Valentine
Valentine
4 years ago

Mercator projection does not make the southern hemisphere smaller. It makes the latitudes close to the equator smaller and the ones further away larger. It is not possible to plot poles on it. But it is used throughout the maritime industry because it is the most practical way to get a round globe on a flat surface. For long distance we use something called Gnomic charts which if you draw a streigt line you get a great circle. Then you can make way points and put this onto your mercator charts. Where it will be a curve. For navigation an orange peel method does not really work. I’m not sure about land or air but for seafarers mercator is the best way.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

@ valentine

Ah, thanks for that. So the whole Greenland being bigger than Africa thing is because Africa is equatorial? Does this mean that South America is also disproportionally enlarged on Mercator maps?

You might also be able to help me with another thing I’ve always been curious about. You know on old timey maps like you see in pirate movies, there’s lots and lots of lines everywhere that seem to intersect at random places? What’s all that about?

katz
4 years ago

Mercator and its variants are the only projection that makes sense in a lot of contexts (local maps, Google maps, etc). But for display purposes, it’s unattractive and misleading.

And intentional or not, it does make the first world a ton bigger than the third world.

contrapangloss
contrapangloss
4 years ago

Stupid first world being more polar. That’s so much of the problem right there.

I mean, Alaska really is about twice the size of Texas, but we aren’t the size of the entire continental US!

But the high latitudes get expanded.

In the southern hemisphere, it’s less apparent because the thing that gets skewed the most is ocean basins.

Valentine
Valentine
4 years ago

@alan
Ne problema 😉 as for the pirate thing I have no idea. It could be graticules they are the lat and long grids. Or it could be that they are plotting ranges and bearings from objects. There’s a thing called loran-c that has maps covered in parabola lines but I don’t think old timey pirates had electronic navigation methods 😉
As far as mercator goes it just so happens most land is in the north hemisphere. The southern high lats are also just as extended but no one complains about that. Weird eh 😉
But on a serious note the charts we use are published by admiralty (as in uk admiralty hydrographic office) so if you’re going to get annoyed about something get annoyed about the British manpopuly on cartography!
Only small scale charts really show the distortion so if you want a chart of the world it is much better getting a globe. For nav we use large scale where it is very difficult to see the distortion unless you are using a planning chart (which is for, you guessed, planning not nav). Mercator also has a double more important use which is that it tabulate the globe meaning that distances between two lats and longs can be calculated using something called meridianal parts of the terrestrial spheroid. I won’t bore you with more but basically it is a way of doing spherical trigonometry for the world. Cos obviously THE WORLD IS ROUND.
And there we have it. Or something anyway.

Frank Mitchell
4 years ago

(Occasional lurker, first time poster … I think.)

Re: geocentrism: Tycho Brahe, whose data led Kepler to create the most accurate heliocentric model up to that point, had a “compromise theory” in which the Sun orbited the Earth but all planets orbited the Sun, with the “spheres” for Mars and beyond surrounding the Earth. Like the “hollow earth” theory in which the rest of the universe is a really tiny bit at the center that just *acts* like it’s really far away, Brahe’s compromise wasn’t popular with purists.

Analogies with other attempts to meet fanatics halfway are left as an exercise for the reader.

Tyler Johnson
Tyler Johnson
3 years ago

Well, this is an interesting bit of information on a ridiculous and delusional group of people, but it absolutely pales in comparison to the type of people this site caters to! Holy crap! After reading just the comments policy I think I’ll take flat-earthers instead, please and thank you.

Rhuu
Rhuu
3 years ago

@Tyler johnson: the idea of being decent to people, and respecting the wishes of minority groups is too much for you?

Well, i’m glad you left a comment telling us that. Perhaps thinking on why you dislike the idea of being civil to people so much would be a good excersise.

9_____9

Thank you for reading the comments policy before posting, i suppose.

weirwoodtreehugger: chief manatee

After enduring yet another season of right wingers having shit fits over the horror of hearing “happy holidays” and reading the news yesterday about Bo Bice claiming to be the victim of racism because a Popeye’s employee called him “white boy” I’m getting a little sick of the over sensitive SJW claims. At least we’re concerned with real oppressions instead of imaginary ones.

Scented Fucking Hard Chairs
Scented Fucking Hard Chairs
3 years ago

I’m getting mental images of Mark Tyler walking through the wrong door into a busy store just to loudly announce “I NEED TO TAKE A SHIT.”

Malitia
Malitia
3 years ago

And 2017 opens with a troll breaking one of the most sacred troll laws (“never read the comments policy”)… is this a good sign or a bad sign?

Scildfreja Unnýðnes
Scildfreja Unnýðnes
3 years ago

Lol! Hi Mark. What did you object to? Did you object to the fact that MGTOWs and MRAs are allowed to post here? Or that David curates this space by requiring a first-time moderation? Or maybe one of the specific guidelines?

– no bigotry?
– no threats or violent comments?
– no gratuitously nasty personal attacks?
– no doxxing?
– no rape apologia or victim blaming?
– don’t misgender people?
– don’t attack people for their sexual preferences, and don’t overshare?
– don’t attack people for their religious beliefs?
– don’t be a ‘splainer
– don’t make everything all about you?
– no sockpuppets?
– don’t pile on?

Which of these is so over-the-top offensive to you that you can’t even?

(It’s the rule against sockpuppets, isn’t it?)

Seeya next time, Mark.

kupo
kupo
3 years ago