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homophobia irony alert racism trump

Dude is mad [homophobic slur] and [ethnic slur] think his Trump shirt promotes hate

He mad
He mad, too

Oh, Trump fans, never change!

Ted • 20 hours ago Bernietard in Lit told me that I was promoting "hate" by wearing a Trump shirt. This dude is your quintessential SWPL faggot. Even before Trump he hated me. All because I called dramakids fags like a year ago. Aside from that and a few glares from spics, I got nods and thumbs ups from peers . My friends didn't make comment on it. They already know me as that trump supporter lol Being a vocal Trump fan hasn't damaged my life...yet. 2 • Reply•Share › Avatar Det. Snide Ted • 20 hours ago Fuck the spics. Keep up the good work.

 

 

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Monzach
Monzach
4 years ago

@Alan Robertshaw

I know you didn’t ask me, but I have to admit that I’m not a rally driver. I guess…I guess that I’m a bad Finn. *sobs* 🙁

Skiriki
Skiriki
4 years ago

Monzach: TORILLA TAVATAAN. 😀 I am in Central Finland, dunno where everyone else is, and soon I gotta stay at home because KITTIES. Namely, see that they settle in and stuff. My place is welcoming, though. And I’ll even promise to bake nummies.

Alan: We know who are our modern day male heroes and men name themselves accordingly, but it is a good thing that nobody knows the secret names of our Fempire’s agents and heroines. ALL HAIL KATI! I mean, *khm* Katie.

Monzach
Monzach
4 years ago

@Skiriki

Well I live in a small settlement on the South Coast. You may have heard of it, Helsinki? 😀

I hope Central Finland is getting a bit more snow, and in more permanent form, than we are this winter. It’s been a constant relay race between snow and rain these past couple of weeks…

Sorry to derail the thread, but come on, this is pretty much the most Finns in one place on the Internet that I’ve seen. 😀

WeirwoodTreeHugger
WeirwoodTreeHugger
4 years ago

I guess I’m Nordic adjacent, being from Minnesota and partially of Norwegian and Swedish descent.

EJ (The Other One)
4 years ago

Nordics (and pseudonordics like Finns) are awesome. It’s no wonder that the cool places on the web would attract them.

I have some friends up in Oulu, if that helps, and a university friend in Tallinn, which isn’t in Finland but I’m told that the locals like to think that it is.

Skiriki
Skiriki
4 years ago

Monzach:
Oh yeah, that place. I hear y’all don’t even have wolves there! How the heck you toughen up the kids and teach the difference between puppies-ok-to-pet and puppies-NOT-ok-to-pet?

And when it comes to snow, this place is currently pretty miserable. It is more like sky dandruff than proper snow and a lot of it went away when we got a week-long rainfall.

WWTH: I’m sure I have enough authority to declare you a honorary-definitely-Nordic. And everyone else who wants to be. You want to be one? Come here, let me declare you one. 😀

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

Any of our Finnish friends familiar with the band Sielun Veljet (or L’amourder as they are in the UK)?

Loved that lot.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

@ skiriki

I was born in the Danelaw and I would have rooted for the other side at the Battle of Stamford Bridge. Can I be one please? 🙂

ETA: I also love the film Trollhunter and know a lot about the Telemark Heavy Water raids.

Monzach
Monzach
4 years ago

@Skiriki

Ah well, that’s why we keep the other parts of Finland around, so that we can send our youngsters out there to learn how to be proper Finns in the forests. 😀

It’s too bad that you’re not getting much snow, either. I have to wonder how we’re going to survive now, since we’re not getting toughened up by a proper winter…

@Alan Robertshaw

I really like Sielun Veljet a lot. I used to live quite near to the singer of that band, Ismo Alanko and I’d see him every now and again. Perks of living in a small-ish city in a small country, I guess. 😀

opposablethumbs
opposablethumbs
4 years ago

::trying slightly too earnestly to be a little bit cool:: I’m a quarter Norwegian – according to the little bit of family history I know, at least (never met that grandmother, unfortunately, or indeed any of the Norwegian distant relatives, but they’re definitely there somewhere – someone apparently decided to do a big genealogy project a few years ago, and tracked us all down).

Skiriki
Skiriki
4 years ago

Alan:

Absolutely! *bops Alan with an icicle-magic wand* You’re now a honorary Nordic! Enjoy!

And yes, I know Sielun Veljet, I’m in that age slot where they were a pretty big name in my childhood, and so on. Not a huge fan, though I won’t scream if I somehow end up hearing their music, more like “okay, that was a thing”.

Monzach: Yeah. Maybe we’ll need to build halls with icy, cold conditions where people can wield sticks… wait. We already got those, never mind.

Monzach
Monzach
4 years ago

@Skiriki

It has been a long time since I’ve last visited one of those temples to true Finnishness, since I really can’t stand modern ice hockey. 😛 I know, I know, I’m showing even more treasonous tendencies than you dared expect.

Imaginary Petal (formerly dhag85, trying out pronouns - they/their)
Imaginary Petal (formerly dhag85, trying out pronouns - they/their)
4 years ago

I once thought maybe I would be able to trace my ancestry back to something cool. My grandfather worked his way back to the mid 1700s to some guy who had almost exactly my name and lived pretty much down the street from us. -_-

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

@ monzach

When they exile you, you won’t even be able to go to Canada!

Verily Baroque
Verily Baroque
4 years ago

@Alan, IP, Skiriki et al.

Special thanks for IP for the Swedish language lesson. That was fascinating. I had noticed a news article about the hen debacle but didn’t realize the word was “invented” already in the 60s.

Adding to Skiriki’s excellent explanation on the personal pronouns in Finnish: “se” (=it) is widely used in some dialects to refer to everyone and everything – human beings and inanimate objects alike – to the degree that referring to someone as “hän” (=personal pronoun he/she) will cause people to wonder whether you are subtly insulting the person in question or speaking overly stiltedly for some reason.

In writing, however, referring to someone as “se” in the exact same context would be insulting (unless we are talking about extremely unofficial writing like chat messages or such). You can bet this makes writing dialogue in novels (and translating foreign novels) interesting. To quote a friend studying linguistics: “Spoken and written Finnish are rarely similar but occasionally they do happen to have something in common”.

IP also mentioned impersonal pronouns a few comments back and I started thinking about them. Finnish doesn’t have them at all. We change the ending of the verb and add the object usually in front of the verb.
For example (Swedish offered at the end for IP’s comfort since it also uses a similar system in addition to the impersonal pronouns IP introduced):
Hän soittaa. = He or she calls/will call. (Yes, our present tense also works as our future tense.) = Han eller hon ringer.
Hänelle soitetaan. = He or she is called/will be called. = Han eller hon rings.
By the way, the verb “soittaa” can be translated as “to call” only in the “… by using a phone” sense, not in the “haul your ass here already” sense.

By the way #2, one of the main reasons I comment so rarely is because no one likes random “Well, on the other hand, in LANGUAGE X [insert an off-topic teal deer]” comments…

@Alan, scildfreja, SFHC

Wait, is Bronto back or not back?

I still remember the moment when I was in a museum and a lady working there told me that triceratops may not have existed. To exaggerate: something in me died that day :’C

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

@ skiriki

Thank you! I now promise to drive round all corners on just two wheels.

Just stuck SV on. Ah, nostalgia and ‘peltirumpu’ is such a cool word.

Monzach
Monzach
4 years ago

@Alan Robertshaw

I’ll just have to come over to Britain, and take your jobs and your women, then. 😀 Massive sarcasm tags, naturally.

EJ (The Other One)
EJ (The Other One)
4 years ago

By the way #2, one of the main reasons I comment so rarely is because no one likes random “Well, on the other hand, in LANGUAGE X [insert an off-topic teal deer]” comments…

This is the least true thing I’ve ever heard anyone say, ever, and I voted for Tony Blair. Random linguistics teal dears are amazing and my life needs more of them.

Verily Baroque
Verily Baroque
4 years ago

Yikes, everyone and their aunt commented while I was writing my teal deer

::embarrassed::

Skiriki
Skiriki
4 years ago

EJ (The Other One): Well it sure is more fun than dull trollery 😀

Monzach: No probs, I’m a hockey heretic as well, we’ll burn merrily together.

Verily Baroque: Or as they say about Savonian dialect… “Kirjoitetaan ‘venesatama’, lausutaan ‘puattipoukama’.” (Sorry, translating that is not happening right now, head too exhausted…)

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

@ monzach

Well you’ll have to ask the women yourself of course, but come on over. The more the merrier. (For old times sake, sneak in via Lindisfarne)

Monzach
Monzach
4 years ago

@Skiriki

Your Savonian dialect example reminds me of a pretty much untranslatable joke: What’s Tarzan called in Savo? Pöhheikön piällysmiäs. 😀

Almost all my family comes from the Karelia region of Finland so I have lots of dialect jokes from Eastern Finland and even the area that…used to be Finland. *sobs*

ETA

@Alan Robertshaw

I’ll have to build my own dragon ship, but I’ll try and see if I can sneak up to the Holy Island once I’m driven out of my ancestral homeland.

Skiriki
Skiriki
4 years ago

Monzach:
*ksnrk* My gran was from Northern Savonia, and I’ve spent my summers and winters there, with her brothers, their wives and farms. I can speak that fiendish dialect at will. 😀

I also know how to detect and dodge a falling cow patty when you’re roughly two and half feet tall and helping to clean a cow shed, and there’s always that one cow who times her poops for that.

Kind of semi-useless now, now that I’m 5’6″ and spending my time in cities.

But, time to scamper. Getting late, I’m old and creaky, and headache has faded mostly away. Hyvvee öit vaa kaikille.

Verily Baroque
Verily Baroque
4 years ago

@EJ (The Other One)

You are entirely too kind. I am verbose at the best of the times and can talk about languages for ages, so be careful for what you wish for. 😉

@Skiriki

Or as they say about Savonian dialect… “Kirjoitetaan ‘venesatama’, lausutaan ‘puattipoukama’.”

Truer words were never spoken. Also a mandatory comment about listeners and responsibility and their relation to one another.

(There’s a saying that when someone from Savo starts speaking, the audience is responsible for the consequences. Essentially caveat emptor but for listeners.)

A rough translation of Skiriki’s original comment is “It’s written ‘venesatama’ and pronounced as ‘puattipoukama’.”
Both words mean “a port (for boats)”.

EJ (The Other One)
EJ (The Other One)
4 years ago

Hang on, Finnish has dialects? I didn’t think there were enough of you to have dialects. That would be like, say, us Afrikaners having dialects.

Which we do, so that’s a bad example, I suppose.

Verily Baroque
Verily Baroque
4 years ago

@Skiriki

Öitä.

Huomenna taas.

(Translation for the, what, 1 person on this blog who isn’t Finnish:
“[Good] night. [Let’s do this] again tomorrow.”

Yes, we Finns are such quiet folk we omit half the words. -.-)

Monzach
Monzach
4 years ago

@EJ (The Other One)

Well, it is said of us Finns that we are silent in three languages, and in each and every one of their dialects. (Those languages being Finnish, Swedish and Russian)

@Skiriki

Have a good sleep, and don’t let any wolves steal the cattle! 🙂

EJ (The Other One)
EJ (The Other One)
4 years ago

Hah.

I’ve heard it said that an extroverted Finn is one who looks at *your* shoes when he’s talking to you.

Then again, all the Finns I’ve known have been pretty enthusiastic people who’ve enjoyed ranting about their favourite types of metal music, so I’ve never been quite sure what to believe.

Sleep well, O you northerners who live in an awesome feminist socialist paradise.

Imaginary Petal (formerly dhag85, trying out pronouns - they/their)
Imaginary Petal (formerly dhag85, trying out pronouns - they/their)
4 years ago

@EJ

Let me know if you ever need a linguistics related teal deer about anything else. :p I could go on.

Verily Baroque
Verily Baroque
4 years ago

@IP

@EJ
Let me know if you ever need a linguistics related teal deer about anything else. :p I could go on.

May I yell from the sidelines that any day you happen to feel like doing a teal deer about the different ways to signal future tense in Swedish would be a lovely day?

Imaginary Petal (formerly dhag85, trying out pronouns - they/their)
Imaginary Petal (formerly dhag85, trying out pronouns - they/their)
4 years ago

@Verily Baroque

Sure, I could do that anytime you want. The non-teal deer version is you use various constructions within the present tense.

EDIT: I can do a more thorough explanation either tonight or tomorrow morning, if you want?

Pandapool -- The Species that Endangers YOU (aka Jackie; currently using they/their, he/his, she/her pronouns)
Pandapool -- The Species that Endangers YOU (aka Jackie; currently using they/their, he/his, she/her pronouns)
4 years ago

Like many other languages, we only have gender specific pronouns in the third person singular. In the subject form, these are han (male) and hon (female).

Are you telling me the name Hans is, like, Guy?

(That was a fascinating read, though. I liked it a lot.)

I once thought maybe I would be able to trace my ancestry back to something cool. My grandfather worked his way back to the mid 1700s to some guy who had almost exactly my name and lived pretty much down the street from us. -_-

A likely story, a very likely story indeed.

comment image

Imaginary Petal (formerly dhag85, trying out pronouns - they/their)
Imaginary Petal (formerly dhag85, trying out pronouns - they/their)
4 years ago

@Pandapool

The name Hans is actually just a short form of Johannes, which comes from the Hebrew Jochanan.

But the similarity to the pronoun has been noted by others, as well. 🙂 There’s an old joke that goes something like this:

– What’s your name?
– It’s Hans, like the King!
– But the King isn’t named Hans.
– Yes he is! Hans Majestät (His Majesty), the King!

Makroth
Makroth
4 years ago

I know the troll is gone (and was most likely full of shit) but i really want to know what this fearsome Redacted M is and what they would do if we knew about them.

Verily Baroque
Verily Baroque
4 years ago

@IP

Sure, I could do that anytime you want. The non-teal deer version is you use various constructions within the present tense.

EDIT: I can do a more thorough explanation either tonight or tomorrow morning, if you want?

YES PLEASE

Krhm, I mean, it would be delightful if you happened to have a time for it some time and I’m definitely not going to be checking this site several times per hour until then, of course not.

(But seriously, don’t feel obligated to do this for me. If you happen to feel like writing the explanation, I’ll adore you. If you don’t, I’ll be disappointed but it won’t kill me. I don’t want you to waste your free time on this if you have better things to do – you were already way too kind with the newspaper request.)

Imaginary Petal (formerly dhag85, trying out pronouns - they/their)
Imaginary Petal (formerly dhag85, trying out pronouns - they/their)
4 years ago

@VB

I definitely don’t mind at all. In fact I’ll get started in 20 minutes or so, but I’m not sure I’ll have time to finish before bed time. If it’s not up within an hour, then you can safely go to bed and check in the morning. :p

guy
guy
4 years ago

I’ve yet to reach much gender-related stuff in my actual Japanese classes, but it occasionally comes up in translator’s notes.

First way of handling it is to just not use pronouns. Sentences have implied subjects reasonably often, and it’s also fairly common to just use someone’s name every time if you know it.

Beyond that, Japanese has a full spread of gendered and gender-ambiguous pronouns for people. I’m pretty vague on the contexts in which people use them, but gender-ambiguous ones are fairly common and used often enough that they don’t stand out*. There are actually various gendered first-person pronouns, but the ambiguous “watashi” is fairly common. Second-person pronouns are generally rude and I don’t know much about them. For third-person, I get the general impression that kono/sono/ano (this/that/that(thing/person not near listener)) hito(person) is more formal and the gendered pronouns kare(masculine) and kanjo(feminine) are less, but I couldn’t tell you which would be appropriate in a given situation.

This has been giving the fan translator for Nanoha InnocentS fits, because it’s exploited for a joke that doesn’t translate well. Basically one girl thinks another girl named Subaru in her class is a boy in her class, as do a number of other characters. Then they’re the characters in focus for five straight chapters before one of Subaru’s family members casually mentions that one of her sisters is just angry because her older sister is paying attention to someone else. The readers knew in advance.

Japanese also uses honorifics, though they’re mostly genderless. -san is neutral and moderately formal; it is the one westerners are advised to use when in doubt. -kun is generally masculine and semi-formal; it is sometimes also used neutrally to refer to subordinates (though often -san is used when referring to women), -chan is neutral and informal; it’s more likely to be used to refer to young girls but may be used affectionately with close friends of either gender or appended to words for an older sibling (particularly when speaking to yours). -sama is respectful and in period pieces often translated as lord/lady but does not specifically imply nobility.

*Note: there’s an urban legend that Samus is identified ambiguously in the original Japanese and the translators made it male. This sort of thing does happen because translators tend to convert ambiguous pronouns and repeated names in one paragraph to gendered pronouns if they think they know which is correct because calling a woman you know “that person” sounds strange in English, but the Japanese manual uses a masculine pronoun. I think that’s a consequence of story rewrites and typesetting deadlines rather than meaning anything in particular.

Patricia Kayden
Patricia Kayden
4 years ago

Strange that “Ted” is using the gorgeous Marlon Brando as his avatar when Brando was an avowed supporter of civil rights.

http://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Marlon_Brando

“Ted” should go for someone who befits his bigotry like William Buckley.

Skiriki
Skiriki
4 years ago

Oh joy, insomnia sure is going to fix the currently lurking migraine! Today is not a great day.

Imaginary Petal (formerly dhag85, trying out pronouns - they/their)
Imaginary Petal (formerly dhag85, trying out pronouns - they/their)
4 years ago

@Verily Baroque

Sorry! I couldn’t finish in time but I’ll finish up in the morning. I’m almost done. 🙂 Good night.

Paradoxical Intention
4 years ago

WeirwoodTreeHugger | February 12, 2016 at 7:32 am
Cerberus,
I think it’s the same thing with rape. There’s always, always at least one person who says that if a rape victim doesn’t go to the police, they’re either making it up for attention or are to be blamed for future victims of their rapist, because reporting a rape definitely always results in the rapist being jailed. They use this anytime a rape survivor speaks of their rape publicly. They said it about Bill Cosby’s victims even though several of them actually did go to the police and nothing was done.

TMI/TW FOR RAPE MENTION AND SEXUAL HARASSMENT

Or, in my case, I went to the police, got my abuser/rapist arrested, and then he continued to be a disgusting piece of shit, hitting on a woman via mail or something, and having her harass my mom and say things like “Oh when [Rapist] gets out of prison, we’re going to get married and have kids and he loves me more than he ever loved you! Ha!”

My mom’s response was “I told you what he did to my kids. You’ve been made aware of what he’s like. You can have him for all I care. Don’t contact me again. *Blocked*”

Then, after that, he stayed in contact with my younger step-sister (his bio kid), and I was okay with that, because she deserved to have that, and he started asking her…weird questions through their correspondence. “What do you wear for your boyfriend when you have sex?” “Is his mom hot?” “Do you give your boyfriend blowjobs?”

And these letters all managed to get through the prison staff.

This man was sexually harassing his own daughter and they let it happen!

Well, Sister at the time was staying with her boyfriend’s family because my mom couldn’t afford to take care of both of them because she’s making peanuts. So, boyfriend’s mom, who loves her like her own daughter, read the letters beforehand and reported him to the prison.

Thankfully, they took care of it and moved him to another facility. Of course, that didn’t stop him from threatening Boyfriend’s Mom over it.

So yeah, sometimes the system fails to protect people even after “justice has been served”.

Hambeast, Social Justice Beastie
Hambeast, Social Justice Beastie
4 years ago

I’m Danish on my dad’s side and German on my mother’s. Most all of my ancestors came over to the U.S. from pretty much the same general region, though (Schleswig-Holstein/Southern Jutland).

My grandfather on my dad’s side was fluent in Danish and German due to being conscripted into the German army (his family farm was in the area of Jutland near the German border). My grandma was sensitive about this for some reason and the quickest route to a row was for grandpa to start speaking German at home!

Also, I like hockey.

ETA: I also like the language derails, very interesting!

A. Noyd
A. Noyd
4 years ago

guy says:

I have literally only seen it being an issue reading an English-Japanese dictionary, because Japanese does not have grammatical plurals but does have some specific words that are always plural and also has gender-ambiguous pronouns.

Actually, where human beings are concerned, Japanese has several plurals: ら (ra), たち (tachi), ども (domo), がた (gata). They’re just not generally obligatory like they are in English, but they’re hardly rare either and show up more in certain contexts like addressing a group of people.

There’s also at least one example in Japanese of a pluralized word that came to be used in the singular as well: tomodachi (友達), meaning “friend(s).” (If you can read Japanese, here’s an article about it written for older kids.)

As for dictionaries, there is such a huge range of quality. The better ones seem to have no problem covering the nuances of “they” (including notes like “you don’t often need to directly translate the generic ‘they'”), though they’re for Japanese speakers, not learners. If you’ve seen it being an issue, maybe that’s a sign you’re working with an inferior dictionary. (Of which there are a distressing number, all of which my friends studying Japanese seem to find and cling to and then wonder why they find Japanese so confusing. *sigh*)

A. Noyd
A. Noyd
4 years ago

Alan Robertshaw says:

I’m thinking now of created names for sci if and fantasy works. A lot of those seem to just ‘sound’ male of female, even though they’re completely made up and have all sorts of random letters and punctuation marks.

It drives me up the wall how so few authors question this. Long ago I decided that I’d design names for female gaming characters that did not end in a, i, y or n. (The n is just because it’s overrepresented in general, not because it’s gendered.) It’s hard to get away from even on purpose, and I sometimes still have to write out the alphabet to stop my brain from ignoring certain candidate letters.

Then there are authors who go the other way and stuff as many a’s in their female characters’ names as possible till you get shit like Aurailaya or Alasaaria or whatever.

A. Noyd
A. Noyd
4 years ago

Verily Baroque says:

one of the main reasons I comment so rarely is because no one likes random “Well, on the other hand, in LANGUAGE X [insert an off-topic teal deer]” comments…

I like linguistics so much I just started reading a seven volume comprehensive descriptive grammar of modern Japanese in Japanese (my second language). For fun. I don’t think I’m especially unique around here, either.

bluecat
bluecat
4 years ago

What an absolutely fascinating thread. My, how it’s grown since I was here last.

The language, punctuation and general discourse of fifth troll was quite distinctive. Not a sequitur in sight.

Thanks especially for the language insights: I liked that very much.

The only bit of Finnish I know is kuusi palaa, which I managed to get a found poem from the various translations of. I get the impression a lot of tacit contextual understanding must be needed – but that’s a position based on pure ignorance.

Anyone else read Woman on the Edge of Time by Marge Piercy? The utopians in that have a gender neutral pronoun “per” (short for person) which I found very plausible.

dlouwe
dlouwe
4 years ago

It drives me up the wall how so few authors question this. Long ago I decided that I’d design names for female gaming characters that did not end in a, i, y or n. (The n is just because it’s overrepresented in general, not because it’s gendered.) It’s hard to get away from even on purpose, and I sometimes still have to write out the alphabet to stop my brain from ignoring certain candidate letters.

The current series I’m reading isn’t too bad about this (especially given the Metric Fuckton of Characters it has), and while at one end there is “Apsal’ara”, “Masan”, and “Kilava”, at the other end there’s “Kilmandaros”, “D’rek”, and “Shurq”. There are also some fairly feminine sounding male names, such as “Dessembrae” and “Ibra”.

A. Noyd
A. Noyd
4 years ago

@dlouwe
Most of those make me want to stab my eyes out. (Maybe with the that gratuitous apostrophe that also plagues fantasy names.) I mean, Dreck, Shirk and December? Does Erikson ever say his made up names out loud?

Brony, Social Justice Cenobite

I may not finish the analysis of FS’s amazingly manipulative trolling tonight. I’m going to finish it because this is proving to be very interesting. They have been very very naughty.

As an example In the thread with the memes by Trump fans I can see that the criticism pointed at Paradoxical Intention was of a kind where they simply wanted to be critical for the sake of being critical. The information in the criticism was somewhat topical in the first and garbage in the second, but there was nothing wrong at all with what PI posted. This is reminiscent of how some people try to keep others compliant and less confident by always finding something to critisize.

The situation with “douchenozzle” is more manipulative than I first thought. It’s an example of someone using something important to another person to try to control them. All that garbage they layered onto the insult over here are things that feminists would be concerned about and would be hypocritical and disingenuous if they were really using. The hope is that they can “gum up the works” socially speaking, though another way of thinking about it is “using your social momentum against you”.

It’s a genuine social conflict technique in the abstract that I’ve used in ways that are not so vile. For example when I was arguing with people on Facebook who were trying to claim that people pointing out racism and sexism were “shutting down conversation” when it was pretty clear that they were simply incapable of looking at the information that went along with the characterization that they wanted to pretend was just an insult. I pointed out that they were effectively asking for a safe zone.

Bina
4 years ago

Anyone else read Woman on the Edge of Time by Marge Piercy? The utopians in that have a gender neutral pronoun “per” (short for person) which I found very plausible.

I have it. I should dig it out again sometime, it’s been years since I read it…