Categories
antifeminism attention seeking bears dark enlightenment drama kings evil ugly women grandiosity hate men who should not ever be with imaginary women ever men who should not ever be with women ever misogyny MRA post contains sarcasm reactionary bullshit transphobia vox day

Vox Day: "Feminism is a Satanic, anti-Christian, anti-reason, anti-science ideology that destroys literally everything it touches and everyone who embraces it."

Man protecting himself from the evils of feminism
Man protecting himself from the evils of feminism

Oh dear. Fantasy author and garbage person Vox Day is having one of those (vox) days, and has decided to take it out on, you guessed it, feminism, pounding out an overwrought little rant on his Alpha Game blog.

Never give feminists an inch. Don’t agree with them, don’t tolerate them, show them no mercy whatsoever. Feminism is a Satanic, anti-Christian, anti-reason, anti-science ideology that destroys literally everything it touches and everyone who embraces it.

Wow. He’s so mad he’s practically plagiarizing Pat Robertson’s famous quote about feminism being “a socialist, anti-family political movement that encourages women to leave their husbands, kill their children, practice witchcraft, destroy capitalism and become lesbians.” I’m not sure how Vox managed to forget the lesbian witchcraft angle.

Reject it and its adherents the way you would reject someone offering you plutonium on their bare hands; to accept it is to begin to die a slow and painful death.

Might I offer you some notes, Vox? This bit seems a little understated. I mean, the plutonium thing is pretty good, but a person handing you plutonium isn’t anywhere near as scary as having, say, a bear do it. Or a shark. Or a bear-shark. Or a bear-sharknado.

The problem isn’t merely that feminists are ugly and hateful, or that their ideology is incoherent and deluded, but that by mere toleration of them, through mere intellectual contact with it, you are permitting your life to be infected and degraded.

Clearly Vox, a dude who clings to memories of his D-list celebrity as a former member of an angsty dance band two decades ago, and who devotes much of his life to pounding out hateful and unintentionally self-parodic rants on the internet, offers us the very model of a healthy and happy life well-lived.

Reject all of it. Reject their appeals to equality. Reject their pretense to intellectual standing. And most of all, personally reject all of those who subscribe to it in any way, shape, or form. Any man who calls himself a feminist is ideologically transgender and mentally unstable.

Ideologically transgender? Wow. He’s come up with an even more obnoxious way to call someone a “mangina.”

Vox, you’re so cute when you’re angry!

And by cute I mean a you’re a pathetic, hateful, disgusting excuse for a human being.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

654 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
contrapangloss
6 years ago

I strongly dislike antivaxxers too.

All the agreement. All the agreement. Little kids getting completely preventable diseases is completely awful.

Plus, there’s a certain level of callous disregard for people who really are too immune compromised due to disease or genetics for vaccination with the antivaxxer crowd. Just because your kid is healthy enough to survive pertussis or measles or mumps or diphtheria doesn’t mean that the poor kid they’re going to pass it to is!

I mean, not all vaccines are perfect. I know. I got chickenpox at eight, even though I got the vaccine as a tyke. Sometimes they fail. It happens. Still, the vast majority of time, they work perfectly.

Sorry, preaching to the choir, but measles is on the rise again, darn it! We had that one almost licked, and they’re ruining it! Seriously, the amount of cases near tripled in 2014!

Grargh!

cassandrakitty
cassandrakitty
6 years ago

If people want to be anti-vaxx then they need to pull their kids out of school and go live on a commune somewhere far enough away not to infect the rest of the population. Living in a society has both costs and benefits, and if you’re selfish enough to decide that what you perceive as the costs should be paid by someone, then go should just ahead and opt out completely. It’s not fair to put other people’s kids at risk because you’re a selfish asshole.

Falconer
6 years ago

There’s also an ableism angle to anti-vaxxers. They’d rather their kid suffer all kinds of illnesses than — gasp! shock! — be autistic.

cassandrakitty
cassandrakitty
6 years ago

I’ve always wondered why they think that a dead kid would be preferable to an autistic kid. Do they not understand that some of these viruses kill people?

Policy of Madness
Policy of Madness
6 years ago

I once saw an anti-vaxxer make the argument that childhood diseases are completely healthy and necessary for a child’s long-term health, and children who die from them actually wanted to die.

No, really. That was her reasoning.

twincats
twincats
6 years ago

Wow! finally caught up.

If people want to be anti-vaxx then they need to pull their kids out of school and go live on a commune somewhere far enough away not to infect the rest of the population. Living in a society has both costs and benefits, and if you’re selfish enough to decide that what you perceive as the costs should be paid by someone, then go should just ahead and opt out completely. It’s not fair to put other people’s kids at risk because you’re a selfish asshole.

My hubby’s ex is one of these selfish assholes. This is one of the (many) reasons why we’re trying to get custody away from her. If/when we do, Kid is going immediately to the Dr. for all of the immunizations Ex refused to get for zir. Kid is healthy as a horse, fortunately, more due to luck than the homeopathic “immunizations” she believes in.

gilshalos
6 years ago

I had chicken pox as a kid.Just because I easily survived it does not make it pleasant! I had German measles too (which actually was kinda pleasant since all I had was a moving rash, no pain) I still had the rubella vaxination!

gilshalos
6 years ago

I totally misspelled vaccination, didn’t I ?

contrapangloss
6 years ago

Yes, yes you did. But we forgive you.

Bina
Bina
6 years ago

I once saw an anti-vaxxer make the argument that childhood diseases are completely healthy and necessary for a child’s long-term health, and children who die from them actually wanted to die.

No, really. That was her reasoning.

Well, if that’s true, then if her kid dies of the measles (as is entirely possible; even healthy young adults sometimes died that way), then she should not even bother to mourn or throw a funeral.

After all, the kid wanted to go. (And with a kook like that for a mother, who could blame them?)

grumpyoldnurse
grumpyoldnurse
6 years ago

anti-vaxxers suck. ::insert serious nurse glare::

That is all.

M. the Social Justice Ranger
M. the Social Justice Ranger
6 years ago

Could I get away with saying that anti-vaxxers are literally murderers, or would that be going too far as per the new rules? ^^;

gilshalos
6 years ago

::bows down before contragloss::

gilshalos
6 years ago

Testing, testing 1, 2, 3…? I can’t seem to post on other us…posts.

Bina
Bina
6 years ago

Could I get away with saying that anti-vaxxers are literally murderers, or would that be going too far as per the new rules? ^^;

Wellllll…murder, by definition, requires malice aforethought. I’d say that since these people aren’t actually thinking, the deaths they cause are involuntary homicides.

grumpyoldnurse
grumpyoldnurse
6 years ago

The old stand-by admitting diagnosis TSTL would also fit. (I read House of God as a cautionary tale)

Buttercup Q. Skullpants

Another thing about antivaxxers, they’ve had the benefit of growing up behind a safe wall of modern medicine. They’ve never seen firsthand the devastating effects of polio, measles, rubella or meningitis. I’d like to introduce them to my 19-year old cousin, who lost both his legs (and nearly his life) to meningitis just over a year ago in the UCSB outbreak.

A few people opt out of vaccines for legitimate religious reasons, because some vaccines are derived from unclean animals, but the majority of them seem to be misinformed conspiracy theorists who distrust the government and/or don’t want to put Junior through the discomfort of a needle stick and/or think it confers a weaker, more “unnatural” immunity.

The worst thing I’ve heard about is “inoculation parties” and disease lollipops. These are lollipops licked by kids with, say, chicken pox , then sold to other parents so their kids can get chicken pox “naturally”. I can’t believe those are legal to sell, or that the germs would survive in the mail. More likely it would come with a raft of other diseases you don’t want your kid to have, like hepatitis A and mono.

(On a side note, speaking of “natural” immunity, shingles is supposedly much worse for people who had the actual chicken pox virus as kids, versus the vaccination.)

grumpyoldnurse
grumpyoldnurse
6 years ago

@ Buttercup – Shingles can be absolutely debilitating, and can last for months. I just don’t understand why anyone would take the risk of contracting a vaccinatable disease. (yes, I did just make up a word)

Also, as the parent of a child on the Autism Spectrum, STFU about how horrible ASD is.

pallygirl
pallygirl
6 years ago

@grumpyoldnurse: TSTL = too stupid to live?

And look, sheep have shenanigans: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/12447635-the-great-sheep-shenanigans

Bina
Bina
6 years ago

Oh great, I had chickenpox at 11. Something else to look forward to when I’m a Little Old Lady… >grumblegrouse<

And yeah. Autism has NO links to vaccines whatsoever. I keep finding stories on yet another genetic link being proved, but not ONE link to a vaccine of any kind. Yet, ironically, somehow those stories just keep passing antivaxxers by…probably because they don't come from quackish sources like "Natural News" (note the quotes, there for a reason…)

grumpyoldnurse
grumpyoldnurse
6 years ago

@ pallygirl – correct!

@ Bina – I had chickenpox at 13, Mr.Grump had it at 30-something. I share your fear. Also, pretty sure that the ‘Autism vaccine’ link was thoroughly debunked, but people won’t let it go. Lots of folks are in the ‘don’t get your facts on my preconceived notions’ camp.

contrapangloss
6 years ago

Bina, the whole “vaccines cause autism” bunk came from one scientific article that was published and then almost immediately rejected, retracted, and considered bunk because the methodology was horrid, the conclusions invalid, the doc behind it even stooped so low as to alter the medical histories of the subjects involved in order to boost his hypothesis (probably because he was being paid by a law firm planning to sue vaccine makers, so no conflict of interest there, at all) and it was all around bogus.

He got his Medical licence pulled after all of this came out.

He’s never been able to duplicate the results, when watched, and nor has anyone else.

The journal that published it issued numerous statements and apologies saying it was bunk.

Yet, people cling to that study with ridiculous fervor, and it’s incredibly galling.

::GRUMBLE::

Oh, yeah, and deadly.

::RAWRS OFF INTO THE MIDDAY SUN::

Robert
Robert
6 years ago

Hey, everyone. Maybe it was the discussion earlier, but I had a good long lucid dream this morning. At one point, I was on a balcony of a hotel overlooking a beautiful lake. I dived off (dove off?) the balcony and down about forty feet into the water. Didn’t feel wet, and I could breathe underwater, but I was still swimming. Flying came later. Oh, flying through the air and landing in a tree – it’s like virtual reality in HD.

weirwoodtreehugger
6 years ago

Inoculation parties made sense before the chicken pox vaccination was invented because the older you are when you get it the higher the risk that the illness will be severe. I got it when I was 4 and it wasn’t that bad and I don’t have scars. However, it’s better to never get it at all now that there is a vaccine. I don’t understand why anyone would carry on with this tradition.

mildlymagnificent
6 years ago

Inoculation parties made sense before the chicken pox vaccination was invented because the older you are when you get it the higher the risk that the illness will be severe.

Absolutely. Somehow or other mrmagnificent managed to miss out on chickenpox as a kid. Caught it from ours when he was in his forties. Miserable, delirious with the fever during the worst 2 nights. I nearly killed both of us by getting him into a tepid bath and then, when he started shivering and babbling incoherently, almost fell on top of him trying to lift his wet, slippery, floppy, uncooperative body out of it. By the time I’d sorted us both out and decided I’d ring an ambulance, he’d drifted off to quite contented sleep and his temperature was back to near normal. So I didn’t do that.

His previously fine, near translucent skin was horribly scarred in places afterwards. It’s an awful disease for adults. And so is the shingles you can get once that form of herpes is established in your system. It might never flare up, it might take 20 or 40 years. But it’s misery beyond compare for those I’ve known to have it.

marinerachel
marinerachel
6 years ago

Inoculation parties really never made good sense. The sensible thing was always to do everything in your power to prevent a kid from getting it because of the suffering chickenpox causes (I’m talking about infants with blisters down their throats and in their vaginas screaming in discomfort for days without sleep) and the less common but very real complications of the disease like AIS and shingles and death. The problem’s always been our lifestyle rarely enables us to prevent transmission of the stupid disease and the possibility it could be more severe in older people. The only reason pox parties ever made any kind of sense is our fear it would kill people if they got it in their teens. The truth is, by encouraging every one of our kids to contract the disease, a bigger number of them did suffer and die than would have if we’d taken it seriously and discouraged transmission. Fewer people having the disease would have saved more lives than ensuring all of them got it young ever did. It’s sometimes more severe when you’re older but you’re also better equip to fight the disease and if we’d focused on keeping the number of people with the disease low, even with it’s potential increased severity with age, fewer people would have died.

I don’t blame my mom or anyone’s parents because the world we live in did not and does not accommodate what was required to prevent transmission of varicella in children. She couldn’t control other people sending their kids who have that single early blister with goo full of virus dripping out of it to school nor could the teacher stop them from scratching it and then touching everything. Without putting us in a bubble to protect us from the people who weren’t doing their part to prevent transmission it just wasn’t possible. It was a losing battle so our parents accepted we would get it and hoped it wouldn’t be bad.

Now we all can so, obviously, unless your kid is immune-compromised in which case the rest of the herd is responsible for their immunity, vaccinate.

kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

PoM – same here with infrequency of dentist visits. I went for decades without visiting one, and when I did, the dude said my teeth were “disgustingly healthy”! Yeah, not missing out on the brushing, and fluoridated water, are what I reckon do the trick. Probably helps that I’ve never been into really sticky sweets. Hell, I’ve still got one of my baby teeth!

lith –

kittehserf:

It’s the whole, “You’re WRONG!” attitude. You have irrefutable proof that there is no deity? Really? Or is it just a belief? And why do you feel the need to tell everyone else they must also believe it? I fail to see how it’s any different – unprovable existence of something versus unprovable nonexistence of something.

Must. Stop. Incoming. Rant.
Grrrr. Fanatics.

YES, THIS! He can STFU about that, because *I* have evidence *for me* of my beliefs, and unlike him I’m not demanding other people share them, or insisting they’re delusional.

For someone who was involved in that bus banner campaign with the “now go an enjoy life” punchline, he’s not exactly an example of acceptance or happiness.

Plus, given his evidence-free bigotry about, oh, women and Muslims, for instance, he should really just STFU as a general principle.

/rant control fail

Lea – this is about Dawkins being a prime example of an Asshole Atheist (TM), not an atheist.

Speaking of antivaxxers, Sheri Tenpenny is booked to speak in Australia this year, and there’s a petition going around to keep her out of the country. Please sign!

http://www.theparenthood.org.au/campaign/stoptenpenny/

kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

Chickenpox and stupidity: some unspeakable moron once brought their kid to the Museum when said kid had open chickenpox sores.

Yes, they were escorted out.

marinerachel
marinerachel
6 years ago

I feel like when I was a kid we were too polite and complacent to do that. Dirty little disease rat kids were something smart parents just quietly discouraged us from playing too closely with which of course didn’t prevent us from coming in contact with something the virus had recently been stuck to from the child but there was so little our parents could do They’d just sort of given up and accepted we would be experiencing

I’m entirely in favour of, when it becomes possible, determining from whom one person’s infection was contracted and charging that person or their parents as criminals for causing harm and suffering or killing a newborn baby of chemo patient or someone’s ninety-three-year-old granny unless they had a very good reason not to be vaccinated.

kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

Apropos of nothing, but gorgeous pic!

Loïs Mailou Jones painting in her Paris studio in 1937 or 1938, with kitten supervising from her shoulder

http://40.media.tumblr.com/f3f24c9a2f968217e4672cb6f02255bd/tumblr_n8i1rvseZB1qzks1vo1_500.jpg

cassandrakitty
cassandrakitty
6 years ago

Every artist should have a moral support kitten.

Policy of Madness
Policy of Madness
6 years ago

I recently saw reference to a paper that found a link between maternal exposure to pollution in the 3rd trimester and autism. I saw it on kottke.org and the write-up concluded with:

It would be a huge help (and I am not in any way being facetious about this) if Jenny McCarthy and all the other celebrity “vaccines cause autism” folks threw their weight behind cleaning up pollution the way they attacked vaccination. Redeem yourselves.

Yes. Yes, that would indeed be helpful.

kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

Every artist should have a moral support kitten.

Truth.

::looks sidelong at zzzzzzzing cats in chairs::

Skye
Skye
6 years ago

Ugh. Nthing the anger at antivaxxers. Herd immunity is for the folks who are too sick or too young or allergic to an ingredient, not for some healthy person with paranoid delusions.

The kitty pic is awesome

cassandrakitty
cassandrakitty
6 years ago

We have people here who’re catless and wish they had a kitty to play with, right? Well, here’s a way to use remote controlled toys to entertain shelter cats via the internet.

http://www.ipetcompanion.com/oregon-humane-society

A much better use of the net than pestering women about their hair, imo.

kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

My internet has the slows atm, but I saw enough to see what a gorgeous idea that is!

cassandrakitty
cassandrakitty
6 years ago

Kitty was ignoring me though, will try again later.

kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

True-life interaction with kitties! 😀

cassandrakitty
cassandrakitty
6 years ago

Next time Nathan shows up we should remember to give him this, so he can get that genuine living with a cat experience.

pallygirl
pallygirl
6 years ago

I could just pack up a box of cat fur and vomit, and send it to him. 🙂

kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

I could send him Fribbie’s “I shall wipe my butt on this” box.

skiriki
6 years ago

@Robert:

Hey, everyone. Maybe it was the discussion earlier, but I had a good long lucid dream this morning. At one point, I was on a balcony of a hotel overlooking a beautiful lake. I dived off (dove off?) the balcony and down about forty feet into the water. Didn’t feel wet, and I could breathe underwater, but I was still swimming. Flying came later. Oh, flying through the air and landing in a tree – it’s like virtual reality in HD.

That sounds very much like swimming in my dream lake; you can swim like you’re flying through water, or do dolphin-like leaps. Much fun!

lith
lith
6 years ago

gilshalos:

I’ve seen a report saying police say their were no threats to Oldham’s staff and fgamily. Thank goodness.

Yay. Hooray for sloppy reporting, eh? Wait, that just caused unnecessary sadness, they can’t get credit for the relief that they were wrong.

lith
lith
6 years ago

Lea:

I’m sorry if it sounded like I was dissing your (or anyone else’s) beliefs – ironically I was actually dissing his forcing his beliefs on others. Bad enough on its own but he’s then hypocritical and says it’s wrong for religious types to force their beliefs on others when really it’s just the same.

You see, my personal belief is that it’s impossible to prove either theist or atheist camps to be correct. For all I know the universe was created in its entirety yesterday and my memories are all fake, I have absolutely no way to prove otherwise. I suspect that the universe probably was created by the big bang, I’m just very open-minded and aware that this universe almost certainly isn’t the entirety of everything, and doesn’t seem to be self-explaining.
It’s even possible that time really is an illusion and there is just this one moment – a snapshot – and my impression of time passing is like… maybe adding 3D to a 2D film, just an impression of depth, of time going by.

lith
lith
6 years ago

kittehserf:

Loïs Mailou Jones painting in her Paris studio in 1937 or 1938, with kitten supervising from her shoulder

I really like that photo, it’s got a lovely quality to the light. I’m almost tempted to put it up in the house somewhere but I don’t know where it would fit. Hm.

kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

lith – maybe crop the lower part? Or do a small photo print of it?

lith
lith
6 years ago

Ah yes, I’ve squared it off and it would probably be good just printed small, thanks for the suggestion.

GrumpyOldMan
6 years ago

In my view, you cannot prove whether or not there exists an entity that corresponds in some fashion to conventional ideas of god — and if it does exist, it may well be of a nature that we cannot comprehend due to the limitations of the human brain. In that context, existing human religions can (IMO) best be seen as human attempts to explain existence in spite of the fact that the most essential piece of information is not available. Dawkins’s argument seems to be that because all existing religious beliefs are probably untrue and many are rather clumsy and obviously inadequate attempts to deal with the problem, therefore it is foolish to believe in the possibility of a supreme being or force. The desire to believe in a supreme being and life after death are obviously major forces in religion, but the fact that people want something to be true is not proof that it is false — though it is certainly grounds for suspicion.
Dawkins’s argument seems to follow the logic of saying that because Vulcans, Klingons and Ferengi most likely don’t exist, therefore we can assert that no intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe. Science is concerned with questions that can be answered by observation and experimentation, leaving questions that cannot be so answered to speculation. It is not science to argue that lack of proof that something exists constitutes irrefutable proof that it does not exist. Dawkins is a polemicist in scientists’s clothing.

Tracy
Tracy
6 years ago

@lith – thing is, atheism is just a rejection of a claim. There literally isn’t anything to be proven or demonstrated, it’s simply lack of belief in god claims. Though some people are really freakin’ zealous & obnoxious about it!