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a voice for men antifeminism are these guys 12 years old? boner rage crackpottery creepy entitled babies evil sexy ladies grandiosity gross incompetence incoherent rage mansplaining memes men who should not ever be with women ever misogyny MRA oppressed men playing the victim that's not funny!

Even more gloriously incomprehensible memes from A Voice for Men's most prolific meme-maker

That doesn't even make a tiny bit of sense.
That doesn’t even make a tiny bit of sense.

The unquestioned king of A Voice for Men’s crew of meme-makers is the mysterious fellow known only as John Galt. Galt, whose contributions are often chosen as AVFM’s “meme of the week” and posted to AVFM’s Facebook page, is truly the meme-maker AVFM deserves — a graphic designer whose graphically challenged photoshopped masterpieces are as baffling as they are offensive.

I highlighted several of his, er, designs in my recent post on Inexplicable AVFM Memes. Today, I’d like to delve further into the photoshop disasters that fill his own Facebook page, some of them official AVFM memes and others posted under his own fake name.

But first, a little introduction to Mr. Galt, as found on his blog.

I live and work in the UK, am a physically fit man in his mid thirties currently studying Computer Science and Mathematics. … I, like most men I know have dated on and off for the past 20 years or so and from my experiences I have come to realize as, no doubt many of you have that there is a deep sickness in our society in regards to how men are treated. …

With a 50 billion dollar divorce industry, sex sold as some sort of priceless resource and victim hood sold to a nanny state as the only valid form of currency it is evident that Men must protect their independence and freedom more vigilantly than ever.

The price, for failing to see what is essentially a fairy tale lie is higher than it has ever been. That price is paid to governments and businesses who profit from the misery of destroyed families, men and women with tax rates and laws that only ever increase. It is paid to greedy women and feminists who demand one sided equality while forcing men to shoulder responsibilities with none of the inherent rights associated with

Sorry, I nodded off for a second.

These fascist lies permeate everywhere from the destruction of Masculine Roles to the ignorance of sex differences in medic

Oh fucking hell he goes on like this for several hundred more words. You can go read it if you like.

Anyway, he ends with a question:

What are you going to do about it?.

Longtime readers of this blog will no doubt notice that Mr. Galt ends his sentence with a new variation on the famous MRA two-dot ellipsis, which I think we can call the Galtian MRA Question Period.

Galt has answered his own Question Period with an ever-growing collection of terrible, terrible memes. So let’s take a look!

There’s this inexplicable homage to a 24-year-old song by MC Hammer.

"It" hate your guts?
“It” hate your guts? And why is she on a scooter?

And this conspiratorial take on “the pill.”

Huh. Yet Galt thinks a male pill WILL bring sexual liberation ... to men.
Huh. Yet Galt thinks a male pill WILL bring sexual liberation … to men.

Apparently feminism was writing nursery rhymes in the early 19th century:

What does this soft-porn pic have to do with feminism or nursery rhymes?
What does this soft-porn pic have to do with feminism or nursery rhymes?

Hey ladies! Get on the feminist gravy train!

One ... MILLION dollars!
One … MILLION dollars!

Apparently feminists want everyone to live in tents, which supposedly look like … vaginas?

"Engenuity?" Apparently spellchecking is for manginas.
“Enginuity?” Apparently spellchecking is for manginas.

Apparently the true cause of erectile dysfunction is … nagging?

Er, why did you use a picture of a Viagra float at a Pride Parade?
Er, this meme is aimed at women. So why did you use a picture of a Viagra float at a Pride Parade?

I’m not sure what’s the most offensive thing about this one — the comparision of feminism to a nuclear weapon or Mr. Galt’s egregious typo.

There are only [] words in this poster. And one of them is misspelled.
There are only 13 words in this poster. And one of them is misspelled.
Your interpretation of this next one is as good as mine, though in a comment on Facebook Mr. Galt explains “yes it does refer to the sexuality between men and women. Specifically sexual aggression – which of course is for all judicial purposes is essentially illegal nowadays, at least for men.

Ok, then.
Ok, then.

Honestly, I don’t think Mr. Galt needs a Men’s Rights movement to solve his problems. I think he might just need to hire a dominatrix. Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

I’ve just scratched the surface of Mr. Galt’s graphic work. I may have to return to him in a future post.

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proxieme
proxieme
7 years ago

LBT – May I pry and ask your generation? (If not, that’s OK.)

I was just wondering because fuck those people who turned on you.
I’m happy that it seems like fewer people who’re just reaching the point of coming out have to endure that (at least on the coasts), but the people who were cruel to you are shit*.

* Apologies if they’re your family and/or you still care about them.

LBT
LBT
7 years ago

RE: grumpyoldnurse

Well, that was just sensible on your part:)

You know, Tiny Us had a lot of dubious taste in reading material. (Piers Anthony.) But even Auel was too much for us. I remember us finding the sex weirdly off-putting, (at that point, we were wondering why sex in stories always seemed so brutal and violent) and Jondalar rather boring.

LBT
LBT
7 years ago

RE: proxieme

LBT – May I pry and ask your generation? (If not, that’s OK.)

It’s cool. I’m twenty-six, so I’m a millennial, I guess.

*snrk* My family, as a number of Mammoths can tell you, are very, very special people. I do not feel bad about other people insulting them at this point. I am not exactly thrilled about how some of my life has gone, but I can take some solace in knowing that I have conducted myself with as much honor and dignity as I could, under the circumstances.

That said, I hope to help create a world where nobody else has to experience what I have.

grumpyoldnurse
grumpyoldnurse
7 years ago

Doesn’t everyone go through at least a short Piers Anthony phase when they’re small?

Yeah, brutal, off-putting sex in Auel’s books. I had normalised it at the time, but looking back, so very many no’s.

LBT
LBT
7 years ago

RE: grumpyoldnurse

Yeah, but I really wish we hadn’t. Dude was our first exposure to child molestation and rape, and he depicted it as something totally normal adult men did or wanted to do. I blame him partially for helping normalize sexual abuse for us as kids.

(Ironically, our parents were fine with us reading Anthony, but not so pleased about us reading Spider Robinson, even though he deals with sex in a much more queer-friendly, poly-friendly, consensual manner.)

grumpyoldnurse
grumpyoldnurse
7 years ago

Yeah, I prefered Spider, too (after I found him).

But, if you grow up in a messed-up space, it’s hard to recognise it and very easy to seek out art and narratives that reinforces that. At least, that’s my excuse! My Piers Anthony phase didn’t last that long (just a couple of books), and I’m very fuzzy on the details, so my inner filter must have been working better than I give it credit for.

LBT
LBT
7 years ago

Yeah, Piers Anthony basically owned our tiny soul from the ages of eight to fourteen. And a lot of people surprisingly filter out the nastiness.

cloudiah
7 years ago

So, totally behind, today was a “what fresh hell is this?” kind of day where I work and I just got home after a nearly 12-hour-day, but I saw this comment:

The moralizing surrounding pregnancy is really harmful. Our culture sets up these impossible rules for what pregnant women are and aren’t allowed to do, and then if anything goes wrong, we blame them for not following all the rules.

A dear friend of mine had terrible issues with depression and self-harm when she was younger, but luckily had access to medical care and finally found a drug regimen that kept her from suicidal ideation. The rest of her teenage years and young adulthood were much better.

Then she got married, and got pregnant. Her ob/gyn told her she had to get off her meds for 9 months, and just you know “tough it out.” When she asked about the risks, he said, “any risk is too great.” She was really torn, and felt guilty and selfish for even thinking about continuing with her prescriptions. Her husband and her friends all said she should fire her ob/gyn and find a new one. So she did, and the new one said, basically, research shows that some of these kinds of meds can cause some problems, usually transitory, for the infant, but they’re rarely seriousy–and in any case, keeping YOU alive should be a priority here. She had a totally uneventful pregnancy (two actually, by now), and both her kids are healthy.

Fuck those moralizers. What if her support system had been less robust? Makes me so mad. Pregnant folks aren’t incubators.

LBT
LBT
7 years ago

RE: cloudiah

*shudder* Man, I managed without meds for years, but the thought of having to be off them for nine months is STILL terrifying.

grumpyoldnurse
grumpyoldnurse
7 years ago

Wow, cloudiah, I am so glad your friend found a decent ObGyn! “Tough it out” said the asshat who flunked his/her psych rotation. “Any risk is too great” except, of course, the risk of your friend having a relapse that she might not recover from. I wonder how many families dumbass has harmed with that attitude? Of, course, I have met perfectly rational people who insist that most (if not all) gyne’s are misogynists…

GrumpyOldMan
7 years ago

“And you and your family sound cool.”

I can assure you that my (adoptive) mother and my first wife didn’t think it was one bit cool.

chronic lurker
chronic lurker
7 years ago

@contrapangloss
Well, she’s nice. But I wish the usual professor was teaching. 🙁 She runs through the material so fast that it’s hard to keep up. She also seems kinda shy and uncertain as a teacher, so I suspect some of her speed is due to nerves. She also gives us no idea what to study. For example, last week she said we had to know all the intermediaries of the krebs cycle. Then yesterday she said we only had to know inputs and outputs, it’s importance, and where it takes place. Then today she said that we have to know inputs, outputs, where it takes place, and *some* of the “important intermediaries,” but didn’t clarify what that meant. It’s frustrating the heck out of everyone.

contrapangloss
7 years ago

… Yeah. Poorly timed sabbaticals stink. When in doubt, flashcard and memorize everything?

If I had to guess the important intermediaries, I’d go with the steps that release GTP (which is almost the same as ATP, but not quite: your phys class may pretend they’re the same) and the steps that create NADH or FADH2 (both are different, and probably aren’t pretending to be the same).

… that’s just a wild guess. Most important is probably the GTP step, but they’re all kind of important because you can’t get to that step (or back to the ‘final’ product that gets the larger gain of ATP) without all the others.

Hoping that helps?

chronic lurker
chronic lurker
7 years ago

It definitely gave me a place to start, which is a lot of help. Thanks!

It’s just five weeks of lecture that I have a day to memorize. I guess it’s possible? The “Flashcards and memorize everything method might not be the best method, but It’s probably what I’m going to have to do. Ah well. =/

chronic lurker
chronic lurker
7 years ago

The figures do a better job of explaining processes than the strait text so I’m labeling flashcards with names and labels to match with diagrams.

chronic lurker
chronic lurker
7 years ago

on the upside, I’ve survived humans vs zombies for a really long time because I have too much work to participate much and none of my classes are at main campus. :p (Though I got ambushed on my way back home, but the zombie hesitated for a second before I started running, and I managed to get away.

contrapangloss
7 years ago

Good plan. If her tests are anything like the favored sabbatical prof, knowing what the figures mean by heart might be 1/3 to 1/2 of the test…

chronic lurker
chronic lurker
7 years ago

Yikes! Well good to know, I kinda got the feeling that those processes would be important, I’ll keep doing the diagrams.

Catalpa
Catalpa
7 years ago

All this talk of fantasy books and Rand reminds me of a quote from John Rogers:

There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.

Personally, I’m incredibly glad that my childhood reading material of choice was Tamora Pierce’s work.

contrapangloss
7 years ago

Tamora Pierce is generally awesome. The Numair/Daine thing still squicks me a bit. I love both of them to bits, but student/teacher should never, ever, ever, ever go anywhere else…

Tessa
7 years ago

Personally, I’m incredibly glad that my childhood reading material of choice was Tamora Pierce’s work.

I wish I had read Tamora Pierce’s stuff when I was a kid. I only started reading her stuff within the last five years. The Becca Cooper books are really interesting if only to just see the precursors of the social shift from it being common-ish for women to be soldiers, towards the very chauvinistic future you see in the earlier books.

I also want more Kel.

(I’ve officially knocked the Auel books off my to-read list. Thanks!)

Catalpa
Catalpa
7 years ago

Yeaaaah the Daine/Numair thing is definitely problematic, as are a few other elements of her stories. (Aly/Nawat is also a pairing that rubs me the wrong way, especially after the short story they got.) But overall the themes and messages contained therein are very good things to absorb.

BUT KEL IS BEST PROTAGONIST I LOVE HER

contrapangloss
7 years ago

Well, we could turn this into an awesome book rec thread!

Glen Cook is pretty good reading! I really like the Garrett PI series. Warning though, it’s pretty trope filled, and it’s first person. Unreliable narrator, all the way. He (the narrator) can also be pretty misogynistic… but it’s still good. Black Company is also pretty decent.

Mercedes Lackey (when she isn’t writing about those interactions I don’t need to think about) is also a fine author. I like her elemental master’s series: they don’t all have kick-ass female protagonists, but a lot of them do. Also, not everyone can totally be kick-ass after trauma, so having the occassional female protagonist who learns that they can get and do deserve help is sometimes a bit refreshing, especially when you know it isn’t just the author’s default “damsels in distress must be rescued” nonsense.

R.A. Salvatore I have very mixed feelings about. He’s not the best author, but I had a phase, and I still dearly love some of the characters. (Guenhwyvar, you need to come be my magical panther friend for a bit. Please?)

For a while there, he was going off on a pretty interesting tangent with Orcs starting to nation-build and “Hey, guess what! Orcs are people too!” only now he’s recanted and gone back to “You only thought orcs were not innately evil. But they’re really just innately evil. So, yeah, let’s go kill some innately evil orcs now.”

And of course, Pratchett. If you don’t know who the Death of Rats (aka Grim Squeaker) is, read Pratchett. It’s hard to figure out where to jump in, because the universe is huge and developed and eek, but if you can survive the first couple, it gets good.

contrapangloss
7 years ago

Kel is awesome. Seconded so much. I gravitate to Daine just because I really wish I could turn into some critters.

Numair I really like, because reasons. But, he also grates on my nerves a lot. I mean, tree spell. I feel really sorry for that poor person who was formerly a tree. That’s got to be really, really confusing. And not fun. Yes, Tristan getting to be a sour apple tree is totally poetic, but that poor tree-person!

Catalpa
Catalpa
7 years ago

Terry Pratchett yesssss.

My first encounter with his books was Going Postal, and I think it’s a pretty good starting point. Sure, you’ll miss squealing over some cameos and things but overall it’s a nice stand-alone story that you shouldn’t need to read all the previous ones to enjoy.

The Colour of Magic is a little slow-paced to start out with, I find.

The Tiffany Aching series and The Amazing Maurice are both good ones for smaller kids to start with, too!

Catalpa
Catalpa
7 years ago

Numair is pretty damn adorkable but I think I prefer him in Niko incarnation instead (they are essentially the same dude I swear). And Niko doesn’t cross student-teacher boundaries, hurray!

I do feel bad for tree-man, yeah. Poor thing. At least Numair didn’t just abandon him as a human, though.

contrapangloss
7 years ago

Tris. Tris is awesome. I heart Tris very much. The Circle of Magic series is lovely for kids, but when the circle opens not so much. Briar gets angry and uses plants to rip people to shreds and Tris has to deal with some awful stuff.

She’s so amazing, though. Rosethorn, too.

Sandry I never was able to connect with.

Tessa
7 years ago

If you like teen books, I can never ever recommend Shannon Hale’s Bayern books enough. They are wonderful. The first book is a loose retelling of the fairy tell The Goose Girl (also the name of the book), but the whole series is brilliant with great characters.

I’ve never read anything of Pierce other than the Protector of the Small (huge sigh) and the Becka Cooper books. I did read the first of the Song of the Lioness books, but didn’t like it a whole lot, and the Numair/Daine really kinda puts me off reading the Immortals books.

I’ve been thinking about reading the circle books for a while, though.

contrapangloss
7 years ago

The first four are definitely written for younger folks, but the circle opens books are more teen/young adult-ish. Shatterglass is my favorite, but I’m biased.

I’ll have to look into Shannon Hale!

Dawn Cook has a four book series that’s pretty enjoyable. It has dragons. Talo-Toecan (the old master who gets to be the non-stereotypical damsel in distress) is snarky and angry, and the protagonist is a stubborn young lady who happens to be awesome.

First Truth is the first one of those four.

contrapangloss
7 years ago

Dawn Cook has another mini-series with terrible titles and dorky cover art. Those are also enjoyable, but not as good as the Truth series.

kittehserf - MOD
kittehserf - MOD
7 years ago

And of course, Pratchett. If you don’t know who the Death of Rats (aka Grim Squeaker) is, read Pratchett. It’s hard to figure out where to jump in, because the universe is huge and developed and eek, but if you can survive the first couple, it gets good.

I started with Lords and Ladies, the twelfth in the series iirc. A friend lent it to me as a good starting place, because it was reasonably self-contained and PT had a little background note at the start.

I wouldn’t recommend starting earlier than Mort, really. I managed Light Fantastic, but Colour of Magic was just … argh, no, parodying the Fritz Leiber stuff just put me off after reading the series when it was so much more developed.

I’m reading Wish You Were Here by Rita Mae Brown at the moment. It’s startling to read a cosy cat mystery (cosy if you ignore the Midsomer levels of gore and weirdness in the murders) and find stuff about sexism or racism being mentioned. Rather cool. Harry the protagonist is likeable, her nearly-ex is a shithead (I’m hoping he turns out to be the murderer, but probably no such luck) and the Furrinati stars of the piece, Mrs Murphy the tabby and Tee Tucker the corgi, are gorgeous. Well, Mrs M is brimfull of Bad Cattitude, but she’s still gorgeous for a little shit. 😉

Tessa
7 years ago

The depressing thing about the Bayern books was that they changed the cover art after the third book. And rebranded all the older books to match the new one. They went from beautiful stylized artwork to generic teen book. See?
http://imgur.com/LrnDDUc

katz
7 years ago

Tessa: If it’s any consolation, the YA boom has led to a lot of preexisting teen-suitable books getting rebranded to match the conventions of the genre.

It’s one of my worst fears that it will happen to me.

Chronic lurker
Chronic lurker
7 years ago

Gah, hard to type with cold fingers on Mobil. Trying to wait out zombies at apartment; But Yay Queen Tammy! (Diane’s my favorite)

contrapangloss
7 years ago

Well, if you become a zombie, I’m pretty sure some of the math tutors are still human. You could hide behind the raven and have a decent food source for a bit.

The Learning Center is perfectly positioned to be an absolute death trap…

chronic lurker
chronic lurker
7 years ago

Turned out all right. I guess they weren’t willing to wait out there all night. I just got back home now. But thanks for the tip! 😀 If I become a zombie I will be sure to use it. 🙂

chronic lurker
chronic lurker
7 years ago

Mahahaha!

proxieme
proxieme
7 years ago

The Tiffany Aching series and The Amazing Maurice are both good ones for smaller kids to start with, too!

We’ve read the first (Wee Free Men) aloud to our older daughters 🙂
It’s a fun series and Tiffany’s a wonderful character.

Re: Discworld in general: I started with Monstrous Regiment and then backtracked through the City Watch Series.

Grumpy: I meant your adoptive family, too. What’s you think of your bio-Dad when you got to know him?

LBT – So we’re (kind of) the same generation (34 – some talking
heads & statisticians say that that’s the very leading edge of the millennials…I’m stuck somewhere between you all and the Xers, I guess).

I’m sorry about your family and I hope to see your goal come to fruition.
FWIW, we’re pretty sure that our middle daughter digs girls and our biggest concern is trying to protect her from the reactions of others (at least through elementary school).
Everyone thinks it’s adorable when a little boy or girl obviously “flirts” or has a crush on someone of the opposite gender…she mostly gets uncomfortable looks and awkward exits when she does the same with girls and women :-/
I mean, I get people being caught off guard, but you can see the look of hurt and confusion at the reactions.

saphy
saphy
7 years ago

I love me some Pratchett, but I am a bit concerned and conflicted about what was sort of verging on a rape joke in Men at Arms.

I don’t have the book here with me, but I can check when I get home. It was Vimes thinking about how various Watch members were partnered up and it says something like “Even corporal Nobbs had someone, although it was probably against their will”.

Am I overreacting?

It hasn’t stopped me reading and loving Pratchett. Am I a bad feminist?

gilshalos
7 years ago

I never saw that as ‘having sex with someone’ against their will. Just that he was atatched to someone.
ie Hanging round Verity Pushpram as she throws fish at him.
I could be wrong though.

kittehserf - MOD
kittehserf - MOD
7 years ago

It pretty well is a rape joke, saphy – I just looked it up. Best light is that Vimes is thinking about relationships or company as much as sex, but yeah, could’ve wished Pratchett hadn’t gone there.

Still love his work.

saphy
saphy
7 years ago

I was worried about that, Kitteh. I remember reading that line on the train and I stopped short like “woah what”.

I don’t think he could actually be an asshole, I think his cleverness just overstepped the bounds of decency: he thought of a clever way to reinterpret ‘everbody has somebody’ in a way that undermined the warmth of the original sentiment, which he usually does to excellent effect. I think he came up with clever wordplay and didn’t think hard enough about the seriousness of the joke-matter.

kittehserf - MOD
kittehserf - MOD
7 years ago

Pratchett’s pretty good on social issues (though I read recently that he can be a total shit to bookstore staff when he’s doing signings – what a letdown that was!). I think you’re right, he likely didn’t think of the other implications with that. It does read mainly as the whole nobody wanting to be near Nobby if they can help it, and the idea of him having a relationship (this is long before Tawneee or Verity) seems to be the main part of it, and yeah, in the sense of company, it is funny. But the description of women throwing themselves at Carrot certainly takes it into the sexual realm and is a reminder that it’s not just being stuck with Nobby at the pub that’s being talked about.

saphy
saphy
7 years ago

I’ve met Pratchett (briefly) in Sydney, and he did seem such a nice and sweet man.Then again it was only the once, and I have been wrong about people before.

Now Neil Gaiman, he really IS nice to everybody. I don’t think he would know how to be an asshole.

kittehserf - MOD
kittehserf - MOD
7 years ago

I met Pratchett at three signings over the years. First two he was lovely and chatty and funny, third … no, rather brusque. He could have been tired, I think he only got off the plane that day. But it made me sit up when I read the other day a comment by a shop assistant saying how horrible he was to everyone working there, while being charming – the Pratchett people probably think of – to the customers.

kittehserf - MOD
kittehserf - MOD
7 years ago

I read that just the other day! The comments were were the shop assistant describes PT being rotten.

I’d never thought of him as a jolly sort, let alone elfin, as some people seem to do. I wouldn’t have guessed he’s got the sort of chronic simmering anger Vimes does, but it’s obvious he does think about injustice and cruelty and stupidity, because it’s all there in the books.

saphy
saphy
7 years ago

Maybe it’s like with Charles Dickens? I mean, that man wrote some of the most wonderful and empathetic stories about human life and suffering and cruelty and hope, but he appears to have been something of a jerk in real life. Maybe the ones that write with the most heart also have the most fury, and it’s hard to keep that kind of anger from hurting people around you.

kittehserf - MOD
kittehserf - MOD
7 years ago

That’s a good point, saphy. Only thing I like about Dickens the man was that he liked kitties. I like this anecdote about a mother-and-child pair who knew how to get what they wanted:

http://dickensblog.typepad.com/dickensblog/2010/06/dickens-and-cats.html

maistrechat
7 years ago

I’m a lukewarm Pratchett fan – I’ve enjoyed some of his stuff but some of it has been a real effort to get through. Maybe I’ve read too much pre-Mort stuff.

I gave up on Goodkind after the book where he Defeats Communism by building a pretty sculpture after having his hard-earned wealth repeatdly stolen by the evil Welfare State in order to support Worthless Leeches.

I recently finished the Name of the wind and the main character’s love interest is portrayed pretty interestingly. It’s pretty clear that she’s off having adventures while the main character is looking for her/playing music in bars/moping but we only get to see the aftermath. I have a feeling it’s a setup for another series from her point of view.