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Open Thread for Personal Stuff: August 2014 Suspended Kitty Edition

Crap.
Crap.

An open thread for personal stuff, continuing from here.

As usual for these threads: no trolls, no MRAs, no arguments.

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katz
6 years ago

Anyways, I was listening to a couple old woman Rhodesian ridgeback breeders. Both expressed frustration over and described as silly the fact it’s hard to get a lot of vets to euthanise ridgeless puppies and that they have to go to great lengths to find old vets who view animals as a resource to put down healthy puppies due to ridgelessness. When confronted about the fact “These puppies are healthy” one argued “We percieve their lack of ridge as a genetic defect.” So, because a dog doesn’t qualify as pedigree it’s “defective” despite that genetic difference having no impact on it’s health and wellbeing (except for the fact you kill it if that’s the case.) These people Godwin themselves.

What evil assholes.

The worst part is how easy it would be to find adopters for ridgeless puppies.

marinerachel
6 years ago

It’s so funny (not haha funny) because they argued extensively that “we’re making the dogs better by breeding out the bad traits and in the good ones” BUT LOOK AT ALL THE SHITTY HEALTH CONSEQUENCES THAT HAS HAD. It doesn’t matter what they’re trying to do, firstly, because their priorities are wack – there’s nothing inherently wrong with ridgelessness, that’s just superficial snobbery that in no way makes the breed or individual dogs better – and secondly, because they use inbreeding to reinforce the traits they like which also reinforces complications to their health like hip dysphasia and neural tube defects. If you can’t get a dog you like the look of without killing a whole bunch of them and producing others who spend their lives suffering, it’s not worth it. It’s not just.

There are a few breeds of dog I love and I think pedigrees are great in the sense you know how big they’re going to be, approximately what temperament they’ll have, etc. There’s certainty in that. I’m bananas over Frenchies and Shiba Inus and Pugs. It’s not worth the suffering of others though.

katz
6 years ago

When you are literally advocating for killing puppies, you need to take a long hard look at your life choices.

(Even setting aside the breed health thing, they could just neuter them and adopt them out as pets and they’d have no effect on the breeding program. Why would you feel the need to kill them??)

kittehserf - MOD
kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

Oh, man, my little brother has been pining for one of those sweaters for years! They don’t come ready-made in anywhere near his size, and he somehow hasn’t tracked down a knitter willing to devote a year of his/her life to making one for him. (I’m exaggerating slightly, but still. He’s a big fellah, with a very long back.)

Not by much! And if he did find someone to knit one, the price would be astronomical. Y’remember my multi-coloured Mick Aston coat? My knitting guru (who runs her own shop) says I’d need to charge $900 for that, and it’s just basic stocking stitch that doesn’t take long to do at all!

kittehserf - MOD
kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

I finally got the sleeves on my purple-cream-sandy striped jacket finished last night. Now it’s just the back and sewing up to do. Fingers crossed the two balls of wool will be enough! I’m not sure Clegg’s have any more in stock.

maistrechat
6 years ago
Reply to  Unimaginative

Re: men’s clothing sizes/body type issues

There’s been an increasing trend in men’s clothing (at least in the U.S.) towards the same sort of sizing shenanigans that women have been suffering for ages. While men’s clothes might “technically” be based on measurements, it’s become standard practice to add a few secret inches onto the waist. Which is terrible for those of us who actually have narrow waists, since it means that most stores no longer carry pants that fit me. I’m lucky if I can find one or two pairs of pants that fit me in an entire store.

The other issue, at least for shirts, is that while there are “separate” neck and arm measurements, in practice there isn’t a wide diversity of sizes available. I have to choose, when I buy long-sleeved shirts, between getting a shirt with sleeves that are too short or a shirt with a collar that constantly attempts to strangle me. Both shirts will be way too large in the chest.

I think this is pretty much a U.S. issue. When I was in China, I was exactly the average height and weight and so could find clothing that fit me in every store. I’ve had fewer problems finding clothes that fit in Europe as well. Here, the only places that regularly stock clothing that fit me are H&M and Zara.

So I guess what I’m saying is the men’s clothing situation here is pretty much the inverse of what it is for women – it’s heavily skewed towards “bigger” guys whereas women’s clothing tends to favor smaller women.

Here are the numbers I’ve found: in the U.S., the most common clothing size for women is an 8, and for men it’s a 40 regular. The average size for a woman in the U.S. is 14, and the average size for a man is 44.

What that means is while the average man is 3 inches bigger in the chest and waist than the “average” size, the average woman is about 7 inches bigger in bust, waist, and hip than the average size.

gilshalos
6 years ago

*sigh* Body shape.
At my best (healthy range) weight, my hips were at least two sizes bigger than my waist. Big hips run in my maternal line. Nothing fit both waist and hips except skirts with totally elasticated waists..with them, I just had a waist, then almost totally horizontal lines outwards to my hips.
Where’s the fashion for hooped skirts when you need it ??! 😛
Now I’ve put on weight, one small silver-lining is that the difference between waist and hips has evened out, so it is less blatant, and I don’t have to choose between material stretched over-tightly over my hips, or being able to hold my waistband 3 inches away from me it is so loose.

katz
6 years ago

My novel got picked as an alternate in Pitch Wars.

Today is a good day.

blahlistic (@blahlistic)

@ marinerachel…results come back negative, ask provider?
Was out of the dating pool for a decade, thinking the turnaround time on HIV tests have improved a lot.

kittehserf - MOD
kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

katz, hurrah! ::applause::

kittehserf - MOD
kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

I’ve just put up my 80th post on Vignettes Across the Veil. I’d no idea I’d done so many, which tells you something about how seldom I do ’em! It’s all new pics and captions, I haven’t been in the writing mood for yonks, apart from commenting here.

gilshalos
6 years ago

Yay Katz!

contrapangloss
6 years ago

Yay for Katz! That is exciting news! That is so cool!

In other funness, I got my cheap (but lightyears better than my laptop) microphone in the mail. It was exciting, and I redid the multi-track of MistyMountains/ISeeFire without the constant buzz of the fridge (Yay for directional mikes!!!!).

Only… now it is almost 4 am. I have to be somewhere a 25 minute commute away in about 3 and a 1/2 hours.

Whoops.

Worth it. Totally. At least tomorrow is a math day and not an EMS day. Occasionally, math makes better sense when you’re tired and well caffeinated, right? Maybe? Hopefully? 🙂

cloudiah
6 years ago

Yay, katz! I had a good feeling about it.

Yay, microphones!

Today’s my all-day marathon job interview. I should not be looking at WHTM right now, but I’m nervous. XD

kittehserf - MOD
kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

contrapangloss, yay for microphone fun!

cloudiah, all the hugs and best wishes for the marathon interview!

katz
6 years ago

All day interview? Oh boy. Pack snacks. (What can they possibly learn that they can’t learn from a regular length interview?)

Fibinachi
6 years ago

Good luck!

Kim
Kim
6 years ago

there’s nothing inherently wrong with ridgelessness,

That’s weird… I heard some people were deliberately breeding out the ridge because the genes for it were linked to the genes for back problems. Also, that some people were wanting it renamed to Zimbabwean Lion Dog for that reason (as well as the whole Rhodesia itself having been renamed). I don’t actually remember where I heard that though, or if anything came of it.

Myoo
Myoo
6 years ago

Congratulations, katz.

Flying Mouse
Flying Mouse
6 years ago

Congratulations, katz!

Hope that the interview-a-thon is going smoothly, cloudiah!

cloudiah
6 years ago

I’m almost done. For some reason they packed a 1.5 hour break in at the end of the day before they take me out to dinner. I met with the big boss, hir 2nd in command, HR, the search committee (twice), the management team in my potential department, people in departments I’d be collaborating with, and had to make a public presentation and answer questions, Also had lunch, at which they luckily didn’t ask me any questions. I am done answering questions for the day. At dinner, when the server asks me what I want, I’ll probably throw the menu at hir and yell, “Why don’t you pick?!??!”

It’s like a trial by ordeal, is my theory. At the end of the day, if you’re still speaking in complete sentences, you get the job.

kittehserf - MOD
kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

Trial by ordeal is right! Talk about “let’s see how they perform under pressure”.

katz
6 years ago

Cloudiah, I assume you are done by now. Can you still talk in sentences?

cloudiah
6 years ago

Yes, I can smeegle in spooty frugulences.

cloudiah
6 years ago

Thanks for smackalasking!

kittehserf - MOD
kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

You’re still making more sense than any troll ever did! 😀

Spooty frugulences sound quite interesting. Like some sort of fruit scent with added weird.

Alex
6 years ago

Oh God, I hope everything went well! I hope you get some good sleep tonight, and that you get the job. 🙂

cloudiah
6 years ago

I’m exhausted, but also too keyed up to sleep. It’s hard being “on” for nearly 12 hours straight.

Especially when you’re basically an introvert.

Also, good job hunting karma to anyone who needs it.

Belladonna993
Belladonna993
6 years ago

That’s the weirdest interview I’ve ever heard of, Cloudiah. What is this field you’re trying to get a job in?

Alex
6 years ago

Oo! I’ll take job-hunting karma; I have a job fair to go to tomorrow. 🙂

kittehserf - MOD
kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

Nearly twelve hours?

What kind of world do these characters live in?

katz
6 years ago

I’m exhausted, but also too keyed up to sleep.

Now that is a feeling I’m familiar with. Here’s to hoping you got the job!

cloudiah
6 years ago

It’s actually totally standard for the type of librarian I am. You only notice it’s kind of weird when you’re trying to explain it to people not in this field. XD

kittehserf - MOD
kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

Cripes! That’s scary.

cloudiah
6 years ago

Hey, katz, SO happy about your book! What happens now?

kittehserf - MOD
kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

My brain broke over the puppy-killing so-called breeders.

On a happier related note: the Australian Bulldog was developed to breed out the extreme features of the British Bulldog that do them so much harm – the terribly narrow hips, the very short nose, skin fold eczma and so on. Breeding programs to help the animals for a change.

Belladonna993
Belladonna993
6 years ago

It’s actually totally standard for the type of librarian I am. You only notice it’s kind of weird when you’re trying to explain it to people not in this field.

Well, the important question after any interview, whether it’s fifteen minutes or 12 hours long, is did you come away from it still wanting the job? If you did, then I wish you the very best of luck obtaining it!

Also, congratulations Katz!

mildlymagnificent
6 years ago

As for killing puppies, their own reasons don’t make any sense. They’re totally incoherent.

If your market for your desired pups is the breeding and showing group, obviously the non-complying pups are unwanted. So you have the opportunity to exploit a totally different market, pets. Instead of having to pay the vet to have them put down, you can Get Income. Bonus! And that income stream also has the potential to introduce a few pet owners into the showing and breeding aspects of your preferred breed, thus expanding your target market in the first place.

What’s not to like?

kittehserf - MOD
kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

Really makes you wonder if they don’t just see dogs as things, doesn’t it?

marinerachel
6 years ago

Take a peek at what English bulldogs looked like 200 years ago. Lots of beautiful paintings of them. They had long legs and snouts and muscular bodies. What we call the English bulldog now looks nothing like it did when English bulldogs were being used for their intended purpose of bullbaiting. There’s lots of mythology modern bulldog owners and breeders will spout off about how their dogs look like they do because it makes them ideal for bullbaiting. They’re either liars or don’t know any better. In reality, when bulldogs were bullbaiting, they looked nothing like they do now. Those wrinkles on their face are not to direct blood away from their eyes. They’re the result of excessive selective breeding to exaggerate purely cosmetic features people have come to love in bulldogs. You know where all the soft tissue of their snout has now gone? The back of their throat. That’s why smoosh faced dogs have dreadful obstructive breathing problems and are so hard to safely intubate for general anaesthesia. It’s still perfectly OK to show and breed a dog who has had to undergo surgical excision of that excess tissue shoved to the back of it’s throat due to it’s inability to breath though as long as it looks the way people have decided it’s supposed to!

Another worthwhile case to take a look at is the German Shepard. See a show German Shepard bred for appearance (it’s not true that they’re trying to produce a dog that fulfills it’s intended role better than any other in it’s breed, they’re just trying to produce a dog within the breed that has a particular appearance currently sought after) and compare it to a picture of a German Shepard a hundred years ago when they were first produced. Skeletally they’re very different. Veterinary orthopaedic surgeons will tell you the show German shepards are unfit for herding. Then look at a modern German Shepard bred for police work. Looks a lot like the German shepards from 100 years ago…..

Basically, this idea show dogs are the epitome of their breed is nonsense. Show dogs fulfill appearance requirements that don’t even lineup with what the dog looked Iike when it was bred for it’s intended job. A lot of dog breeders don’t know that though and believe that’s what working bulldogs or shepards looked like.

Ridgeless Rhodesian ridgebacks ARE healthier than Rhodesian ridgebacks. At least 5% of dogs with the ridge have a dermoid sinus, a neural tube defect. That sinus may still be connected to the dog’s spinal cord. It will become infected and abscess at some point in the dog’s life if it’s not surgically removed. At best, it’s painful and recurrent. At worst, it leads to meningitis and death. 0% of ridgeless dogs have this defect. A show-ready dog has the ridge though and if that doesn’t justify continuing to produce this defect the excuse “Well, the ones with ridges are said to have been better at baying lions”. THAT DOESN’T EVEN MAKE SENSE.

Love my mutts. I. Love. My. Mutts.

kittehserf - MOD
kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

marinerachel, you’re so right! I just looked at the Wiki article on bulldogs and saw this one from 1790. Looks more like a terrier type, doesn’t it? At least thats what comes to mind to me.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bulldog#mediaviewer/File:Philip_Reinagle_-_Bulldog.jpg

It squicks me out when I see Shepherds with those extremely sloping backs.

The whole show breeding thing has so many awful results. Look at the short-nosed dogs and cats, the Pekes and Persians who look like they’ve had their faces pushed in. Ugh, ugh, ugh.

Most of the dogs I used to meet in the park on the way to work were mixed breeds. The owners generally knew what they were, too (yes I’d go up and talk to strangers about their puppehs). Lovely dogs, all of ’em.

marinerachel
6 years ago

Australian bulldogs are so freaking cute and, yeah, they’ve moved away from the features that cause health complications.

A friend who is a respiratory therapist has an American bulldog. He’s got some breathing issues which makes everyone laugh because she’s an RT and her dog should be on CPAP. Anyways, he’s healthy by most accounts but still will develop hip dysplasia with age and become increasingly disabled. Unfortunately, he LOVES sports. It’s a tough call because he wants to play hard. That’s what brings him pleasure. It’s what he lives for. He wants to go cycling and skiing with his lady and he runs HARD. We all know he’s one step closer to disability and eventually euthanasia every time he goes for a hard run but he just loves it. It’s how he wants to live. When I’m with him I try to spend as much time in the water as possible because swimming is great for his hips and he’s just as enthusiastic about leaping off the boat. I see him having an awesome time and know I’m not harming him. I can’t blame his family for letting him do what he pleases though. It’s his life. He won’t live as long but, gosh, he’s enjoying himself while he’s here.

kittehserf - MOD
kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

Well, that’s weird … the picture didn’t load. Try again:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2f/Philip_Reinagle_-_Bulldog.jpg

marinerachel
6 years ago

And that’s what working English bulldogs looked like.

With the cow testicals to nom on and everything.

cassandrakitty
cassandrakitty
6 years ago

What’s the health status with those dogs that look like someone shrank a Malamute? They’re awfully cute but I can’t help worrying about what harm in might have done to them, making them that small.

kittehserf - MOD
kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

marinerachel, that’s so sad about your friend’s dog’s future. Almost makes you wish his family lived on a boat, doesn’t it?

kittehserf - MOD
kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

With the cow testicals to nom on and everything.

I thought that was a leg bone!

MISANDRY!

cassandra, are those the Alaskan Klee Kai? I’m just googling miniature malamute here.

cassandrakitty
cassandrakitty
6 years ago

Maybe? That sounds right. There’s someone local who has one that I see around sometimes.

kittehserf - MOD
kittehserf - MOD
6 years ago

There’s a Pet MD page on them here:

http://www.petmd.com/dog/breeds/c_dg_alaskan_klee_kai

So. Much. Cute.