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The Man Boobz Survey Results are in!

haUp66D

So the Man Boobz survey results are in, and Argenti Aertheri, who ran the survey, has taken the time and effort to make an impressive set of interactive charts to display the data in all of its gory details. You can find that chart below — thanks again, Argenti! — but I thought I’d highlight a few of the results first.

Let’s start with the white elephant in the room. I know I’ve made some somewhat rude remarks in the past about the high percentage of white people in the Men’s Rights subreddit.

Well, it turns out that the Man Boobz readership is even whiter than that. Yep. Using the same somewhat limited set of choices used by the dude who did the Men’s Rights subreddit survey, the MB survey found that the readership of this blog is nearly 92% white, and less than 2% each Asian, Hispanic and Black, with the remainder answering “Other.”

There is also a more complicated breakdown of ethnicities, based on a more nuanced set of questions, that I’m not even going to try to summarize; you can look through the charts yourself.

But, basically, yeah, this blog’s readership, like me, is pretty darn white. I  take these results as an indication that I need to do a better job dealing with issues of race and racism. While this blog is primarily about misogyny, there is plenty of racism in the manosphere — from the white-supremacism-lite of Heartiste to the fetishization of Asian women as submissive — and it’s worth pointing this out on a more regular basis, as well as addressing some of the more subtle ways misogyny intersects with other forms of oppression. As well as the ways in which the standard (non) issues of the Men’s Rights movement can actually serve to obscure the very real issues faced by men of color. (See yesterday’s post for a perfect example of that.)

So what are some of the other notable results?

You’re all younger than me. Well, not literally ALL of you. In fact, there are a whole 4% of you older than me.

But the fact is that if you’re reading this, the chances are really, really, really good that you’re in your twenties or early thirties. Still, I feel fairly confident in saying that eventually you will be as old as I am now.

Also, it’s pretty likely that you’re a lady. Most of the readers of the blog — 59% — are cis women, with 30% cis men. The remaining 11 percent are made up of trans* women (2.2%), trans* men (0.9%), intersex (o.2%), “non-binary” (5.2%) and “other” (2.5%).

See the interactive charts below for a much more detailed breakdown of the data on gender and sexuality.

We’re a bunch of pinkos. More Man Boobzers identified themselves with Democratic Socialism than with any other political label. The second and third place winners in this category? “Other US Liberalism” and “Social Democratism.”

The sun never sets on the Man Boobz empire. Predictably, most Man Boobz readers — roughly 58% —  live in the United States. And there are lots of Man Boobzers in other English-speaking countries around the world, particularly the UK, Canada, and Australia.

But Man Boobz attracts readers in a lot of places where English speakers are in a minority. I was a little surprised to find that there are twice as many Boobzers in Germany, for example, than in New Zealand, and that there are nearly as many in Iceland as in Ireland. There are readers in countries ranging from Argentina to El Salvador, from Jordan to Japan.

There are all sorts of other intriguing factoids to be found in the survey results, from a rather complicated slicing-and-dicing of religious beliefs to answers to the critical question: how many of you are actually me?

If you don’t have Flash, go here to see the charts in all their glory.  See here for the footnotes and survey questions and raw data.

If you’re not a regular commenter here, this will help you to make sense of some of the silly in-jokes at the end of the survey.

One last note: The survey doesn’t tell us what percentage of Man Boobz readers consider themselves feminists or, ick, Men’s Rightsers. I’m going to do a quick followup survey on that in an upcoming post.

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Unimaginative
Unimaginative
7 years ago

I think our overwhelming whiteness might be a function of our, um, function. We mock misogyny, and the most laughable misogynists are MRAs, who are overwhelmingly white. And maybe just not that entertaining to many people of colour. When I come across issues of misogyny among people of colour, they’re less silly, and often kind of horrifying. I’d feel very uneasy about mocking them.

Although, maybe if David invited some people of colour to guest-blog, my assumptions about non-white misogynists would be shattered, and I’d learn that misogynists of colour are just as silly as the mostly-white manosphere. Who are very, very silly.

Argenti Aertheri
7 years ago

Cassandra — oh of course, but I mean the national data in comparison to the US. (And I live in CT, just outside New Haven, you can basically watch the state get whiter as you head north until you get close to Hartford)

I should be repotting a very root bound plant, but I need to stop sweating quite so much first.

CassandraSays
CassandraSays
7 years ago

Birmingham definitely. My first roommate was from there!

sarahlizhousespouse
7 years ago

@crmsnfrn

<3 Germany.

I sit at home and eat bon bons all day too! 😀

toujoursgai
7 years ago

Thanks, Kittehserf!

*high fives Argenti Aertheri*

Argenti Aertheri
7 years ago

Argenti’s fine, and I got so excited about there being another mentally ill genderqueer around here that I forgot to ask — what sort of pronouns do you prefer? I use ze/zir and folks around here are cool about it (hell, I had one of our regular trolls apologize about this the other day!)

Ally S
7 years ago

Argenti, since we’re talking about you, how do you pronounce your full nym? I’m just wondering because I feel like I fail horribly when I try to pronounce it. =P

Argenti Aertheri
7 years ago

It’s latin, the root’s pronouncation is here and the last syllable is like tea instead of tum. (And Aertheri is mangled Latin to make it easier to say, are-theory, basically. Cuz I can’t pronounce æther)

Ally S
7 years ago

Yay I got half of it right! ^_^ I kept messing up on Aertheri – I used to pronounce it as “Airtheiri” for some very odd reason. (Yes, I know that my pronunciation habits are weird.)

Argenti Aertheri
7 years ago

Your pronouncation habits are weird? Draw and drawer are the same word according to my speaking bits!

Kittehserf
Kittehserf
7 years ago

Oh good, I’m glad it’s a soft g – I think of it as much as the French sound as anything.

Shall we tell dustydeste the terrible secret of the Corner of Shame?

katz
7 years ago

But how do you guys pronounce “bagel?”

Ally S
7 years ago

“Beigel” for me.

Kittehserf
Kittehserf
7 years ago

Baygle. Hard g.

SittieKitty
7 years ago

I’m a neuroatypical GQ! *waves*

toujoursgai
7 years ago

I like ze/zir, too. Thanks for asking!

Also, Community! Yay!

Falconer
7 years ago

BAYgəl

… and the study group can be a bunch of assholes, can’t it?

Dvärghundspossen
7 years ago

Regarding pronunciation – how does one pronounce “zie” and “zir”? Is it like “she” and “her”, except that one replaces the “sh” and “h” respectively with a Z-sound? And, on that topic, is Z pronounced like a slightly buzzing S?

Falconer
7 years ago

I was right, Falconer IS Cary Grant.

Darn tootin’.

… No, wait, he’s my uncle.

Falconer
7 years ago

Regarding pronunciation – how does one pronounce “zie” and “zir”? Is it like “she” and “her”, except that one replaces the “sh” and “h” respectively with a Z-sound? And, on that topic, is Z pronounced like a slightly buzzing S?

I tend to prounounce them that way, yes.

And yes, in English, Z is a voiced S in most cases (can’t think of one where it isn’t right off hand, but only Sith deal in absolutes).

Falconer
7 years ago

Disclosure: I do not use gender-neutral pronouns for myself.

Mark Jones
Mark Jones
7 years ago

Who would have figured that manboobz is just a site full of fragile white people moaning about how oppressed they are?

Unimaginative
Unimaginative
7 years ago

And yes, in English, Z is a voiced S in most cases (can’t think of one where it isn’t right off hand, but only Sith deal in absolutes).

Which is a sure sign that the Sith are not English speakers. There are absolutely NO absolutes in English.

@Mark Jones: isn’t it interesting that a sure sign of incompetence is a complete lack of self-doubt and self-reflection? We’re not moaning, we’re laughing at you. Sometimes we point, too.

mildlymagnificent
7 years ago

I’m pointing right now.

chibigodzilla
7 years ago

Who would have figured that manboobz is just a site full of fragile white people moaning about how oppressed they are?

Well, it is a site that largely focuses on the manosphere; it doesn’t get much more “fragile white people moaning about how oppressed they are” than the manosphere.

Viscaria
Viscaria
7 years ago

Oh Mike. First of all, as Unimaginative has pointed out, we actually make fun of the whiners here. Secondly, while I am oppressed as a queer*, mentally ill woman, I am certainly not oppressed as a white person. That gives me power and privilege over people of colour. Only a total racist bigoted douchebag would deny that, and only a total racist bigoted douchebag wouldn’t try to correct it whenever possible.

*This one is kind of complicated but w/e

Viscaria
Viscaria
7 years ago

Oops. Mark. My bad.

pecunium
7 years ago

Z, at the opening of a word, is pretty much a voiced S. Inside a word it varies, in part because we have a lot of borrowed words.

Often the variants are marked with ancillary consonants (e.g, as in Zhivago).

hellkell
hellkell
7 years ago

Who would have figured that manboobz is just a site full of fragile white people moaning about how oppressed they are?

Welcome to the MRM.

Argenti Aertheri
7 years ago

Hm, perhaps the easiest way I can put it is that when NWO called me a “zie creature” it isn’t the same sound as a “sea creature”. Oh! Zebra, without the bra (yes I just said that)

LBT
LBT
7 years ago

Oh god, my time studying linguistics has ruined me. I just use IPA for everything. But using that, Dvarghundspossen, it’s pronounced [zi] and [zəɹ]. The letter [z] is a voiced sibilant–so yes, s with voice behind it. [i] is a long eeeeeee sound, like the stereotypical shriek when you see a mouse. [ə] is a slack vowel with the tongue positioned in the mid-center of the mouth, and in the US, it’s everyone’s favorite vowel and we use it for fucking everything, pretty much. As for [ɹ]… well, it’s technically an ‘alveolar approximant,’ which means your tongue is roughly up by that ridge directly behind your teeth. It’s one of the tougher sounds in English to pronounce, because we suck and can’t just do a trilling [r] like everyone else on the planet.

…and I just single-handedly made it seem even more confusing than before, didn’t I? GODDAMMIT EDUCATION.

LBT
LBT
7 years ago

Also, thanks Argenti! Even though I was kinda crap at understanding a lot of those statistics, I appreciate the hard work that went into it.

SittieKitty
7 years ago

It’s the z sound from zebra, and then ee, like LBT said, (instead of bee, it’s zee) and I’ve always said the second one like (z)ear. Zie Zir.

katz
7 years ago

I just use IPA for everything.

You must be constantly hammered.

chibigodzilla
7 years ago

Don’t some British folk pronounce zebra with a short e rather than USian long e? Like, the ‘zeb’ rhymes with the ‘feb’ in February.

I always figured zie rhymed with bee and zir rhymed with sir.

Argenti Aertheri
7 years ago

Of course American English says zebra wrong, I should’ve guessed >.<

So yes, ze / bee and zir / sir (this is why I drop the i in zie btw, it isn't there pronunciation wise)

I still like ze is a braless zebra, just for the non-sequitur of it.

LBT
LBT
7 years ago

RE: katz

*rimshot*

RE: Argenti

Of course American English says zebra wrong, I should’ve guessed >.<

Actually, it’s kind of interesting. American Standard English is more known for yoinking pronunciation a little more fluidly than UK Standard, in some ways anyway. It’s why you get weird things like ‘quixotic’ sounding COMPLETELY different than Don Quixote–apparently ASE at least ATTEMPTS to mimic Spanish pronunciation for the name, but yoinks the UK pronunciation for the adjective.

Argenti Aertheri
7 years ago

Lol, ok. Schedule and privacy et all are still weird though.

Dvärghundspossen
7 years ago

Thanks for all the pronunciation advice. 🙂 Like so many Swedes, I have a tendency to just go “S” when it’s supposed to be “Z”, because we don’t have the “Z” sound in Swedish.

On the other hand, native English speakers always use the “H” sound when it’s supposed to be the sound that we Swedes spell sj, sk or sch and the Spanish spell g (like in Gibraltar), because English don’t have that sound. 🙂

Hm… I actually think there are only two sounds that English has and Swedish lack; Z and the W sound in “will” and “winter”. Although the latter isn’t difficult to say, so I have no problem with that.
I count to three sounds that Swedish has and English lack: The above mentioned sj/sk/sch, the vowel sound we use to pronounce the letter U (it’s a bit similar to O, so native English speakers who learn Swedish always does an O instead) and the vowel sound we use for Y (which is a bit similar to a long E, so native English speakers tend to use that instead).
And we also pronounce R differently, because it’s softer in English.

It’s sort of funny when you think about it that people in different parts of the world haven’t merely come up with different ways to arrange the sounds, but to some extent different sounds too.

Dvärghundspossen
7 years ago

Haha, all you guys who have complimented me on my English skills really ought to hear me speak. Me and Husband watched some clip from “the room”, and I made some comment about how funny Tommy Wiseau sounds, and Husband just looked at me… And I was like “please don’t say I have an English accent as weird as Wiseau:s”, and Husband was like “weeell….”

Argenti Aertheri
7 years ago

Dvärghundspossen — it pretty much can’t be worse than Alabama. Which makes no sense to me as I can understand the adjacent states, but Alabama? Yeah, please face me so I can read your lips.

And Pittsburghese grammar took me a while to get down (to be verbs are optional, among other oddities) — the 29g tank needs cleaned. Which’d really be “the 29 needs cleaned” among Pittsburgh aquarists. ‘Nat or red up are even worse (“and that” and “ready up” respectively). It’s where I picked up things like “I’d’ve”

Point? Even within the US American English is weird.

LBT
LBT
7 years ago

RE: Dvardhundspossen

Yeah, phonetics and phonology are actually really cool! Different languages DO have different sounds, and different rules about when you use them. That’s why people have accents; they’re pretty much shoehorning a language into their existing phonetic framework, and sometimes it sounds weird.

Argenti Aertheri
7 years ago

Dvärghundspossen — this is just Pittsburghese phrases. Try the places for real fun (ah ‘sliberty, how I miss thee)

Argenti Aertheri
7 years ago

“Pittsburgh Toilet Only a Picksburgher would have a toilet without a door in the middle of the cellar.. (Submitted by Jay Volk, Point Breeze)”

This is entirely true and you should’ve seen my reaction the first time I actually saw one! The gaslighting narcissist ex used it for one of those auto-flushing litter boxes though. (They’re hang overs from the steel mill days when the men’s come home covered in grime and have to clean up downstairs)

And yes, this is where my ‘ello comes from.

Dvärghundspossen
7 years ago

My own accent came about because I lived for three years in a student dorm with mostly exchange students from all over the world. We spoke English all the time, since that was the only language everyone there knew (the exchangers would rotate every semester, so they rarely learned good Swedish before being replaced by a new face). What happened in that multi-accent environment was that the accents of everyone started to blend into one big accent which can only be described as “general foreign”. So I don’t really speak English with a Swedish accent, but a general foreign accent – which is why everyone who hears me speak has such trouble trying to pin down where I come from.

Husband though, totally sounds like an Englishman (yes, even actual Englishmen will think he’s a countryman) . He hasn’t lived there or anything, but he studied English at the university for one semester, and has an incredible ear for it.

So yeah, when abroad, we’re a married couple who sounds as if we’re comprised of one Englishman and one general foreigner.

Dvärghundspossen
7 years ago

Dvärghundspossen — this is just Pittsburghese phrases. Try the places for real fun (ah ‘sliberty, how I miss thee)

*lol* I’ve noticed though, that when people hear a tourist is around, they tend to adjust their speech to something closer to the national standard.

Falconer
7 years ago

It’s why you get weird things like ‘quixotic’ sounding COMPLETELY different than Don Quixote–apparently ASE at least ATTEMPTS to mimic Spanish pronunciation for the name, but yoinks the UK pronunciation for the adjective.

… You mean it ISN’T pronounced key-HOE-tic, and it actually IS pronounced quick-SOT-ic?

I may need to apologize to my gaming group.

Also I understand that the English call him Don Joo-an.

Dvärghundspossen
7 years ago

Also I understand that the English call him Don Joo-an

Juan has that sound in the beginning that I was talking about, that exists in Swedish as well as Spanish, but not in English. So English-speakers will either say “Huan” or “Juan”.

Dvärghundspossen
7 years ago

Juan has that sound in the beginning that I was talking about, that exists in Swedish as well as Spanish, but not in English. So English-speakers will either say “Huan” or “Juan”.

I meant, they will either say “Huan” or “Juan” with an English J.

Falconer
7 years ago

I tend to say Huan, myself, as the least likely to sound like I think the Spanish don’t know how to pronounce their own language.