Categories
advocacy of violence hundreds of upvotes men who should not ever be with women ever misogyny MRA rape rape culture reddit threats victim blaming

Raw Story on The Top 5 Rape-Apologist Reactions to the Steubenville Verdicts [UPDATED]

rape_culture

RawStory has a piece up highlighting The top 5 rape apologist reactions to the Steubenville rape verdict. It’s well worth reading. As the author of the piece, Emily Mullen, notes:

The Steubenville guilty verdict spawned nearly as much rape apology as the original news of the case did, highlighting the point — made by feminists like Zerlina Maxwell and Jaclyn Friedman — that America has a long way to go before it gets past blaming victims and sympathizing with rapists.

I haven’t yet run across any reactions in the Manosphere to the verdicts, but I’m sure we’ll see some in the next few days. If you run across anything especially awful, in the Manosphere or outside of it, please let me know.

Men’s Rights Redditors, currently silent about the verdicts, were up in arms the other day because Reuters was identifying the accused — now the convicted — rapists, while not identifying the victim. Or, as MRAs prefer to put it, the “alleged victim.” Now, as RawStory points out, she is getting death threats.

EDITED TO ADD: More victim blaming online, as catalogued on the Public Shaming blog: First post, second post with more.

Below,  Several examples borrowed from Public Shaming. TRIGGER WARNING for rape apology.

.

.

.

.

.

.

tumblr_inline_mjttyzPbYu1qawfnhtumblr_inline_mjtu0gSYbN1qawfnhtumblr_inline_mjtcwiT2Pn1qawfnh

 

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

191 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
emilygoddess
emilygoddess
8 years ago

@Sideliner

Sure the boys had defense lawyers, and there was a judge, and tons of media attention….but only a random internet commenter figured out it was the wrong charge!!!

And even if the legal system decided to call it “sexual assault” or “molestation” or “battery”, we’re not just having a legal discussion. We’re talking about the phenomenon of rape and how to end it, and for THAT discussion it’s all rape and it’s all terrible no matter what divisions the legal system feels the need to draw. As far as I can tell, the legal distinctions have more to do with sentencing than with naming the crime – kind of like how manslaughter, murder and lesser-degree murder all carry different sentences, but all still boil down to “you killed someone”.

@Noadi

What bothers me is how many people are focusing on the fact she was drinking underage to excuse the rape. Should she have been drinking underage? No, we have a minimum drinking age for a reason. Last I checked though that is not an invitation to be violated and it’s certainly not consent. Those boys still made the decision to rape her while she was unconscious.

And isn’t it funny how rape is considered an appropriate punishment for women who drink, but not for men? It’s almost like it’s not the drinking itself that’s the problem here.

As for the rapists: as Titianblue said, they’re products of rape culture. They were taught that this was OK. Being caught this young and actually found guilty could be the best thing for them: they have a chance to learn better. And as long as we’re talking about futures ruined, let’s not forget that many rapists rape more than once, and I’m happy to trade these boys’ futures (ooh, two years of juvie and having to start college a little later, how terrible) for the futures of the women they might have gone on to rape.

Sideliner
Sideliner
8 years ago

@Falconer – you will sleep again! At least for us it got better at 6 weeks, then even better at 3 months, then a few weeks ago he decided to sleep all the way through (about 11 hours). It’s both felt like forever and like it’s all flown by. Now he’s getting mobile so we’ve got a whole new set off things to worry about!

@titianblue – I agree, society set them up for this in many ways. My dad’s an administrative judge who handles driver’s license suspensions, and he’s constantly stunned at how many high school athletes think he’ll be able to “cut them a deal” so they can keep playing their sport even after they’ve flagrantly broken every traffic law on the books…and he’s not even in a state that has any “big” high school sports programs.

Teaching kids that respect for others is negotiable doesn’t end well for anyone.

Sideliner
Sideliner
8 years ago

And even if the legal system decided to call it “sexual assault” or “molestation” or “battery”, we’re not just having a legal discussion. We’re talking about the phenomenon of rape and how to end it, and for THAT discussion it’s all rape and it’s all terrible no matter what divisions the legal system feels the need to draw

Absolutely….and my apologies if I implied otherwise. I just get really annoyed when people start trying to take it down the “legal definition” road when they’re not even correct. You’re right though, it would be awful and wrong no matter how it was classified in a book somewhere, because this is a real person who was really violated.

Gillian
Gillian
8 years ago

@Nitram With respect, please give some more consideration to the line of thought you are pursuing there.

I get uncomfortable with the description of these perps as “rapists” because it sears in our mind this pervasive myth that rapists are monsters and monsters are rapists. These boys are a product of rape culture…These are not big bad rapists. They are ordinary people, taught from a very early age that women are things, they exist to please men, they have no agency.

The idea that there are “big bad rapists” and “ordinary people” who sometimes rape is itself a part of rape culture. You are trying to express yourself with a measure of grace and compassion, but this line of thought in fact only serves to perpetuate the false idea that there is “forcible rape” or “rape rape” and something else that we still call rape but hedge around suggesting that it deserves some other name.

Yes, these two internalized the message that other people exist to amuse and please them. Acting in keeping with this message, they abused a young woman, displaying a remarkable callousness and lack of basic humanity. Acting as predators, they selected a victim who was both personally vulnerable and in a position where the power imbalance would prevent anyone from standing up to help defend her. They chose to act because they expected no one around them would object (and sadly they were correct, which makes me wonder what their peers have let them get away with before this event).

They committed rape. This makes them rapists. To describe them as anything else suggests that there are somehow “degrees” of rape, that rape is anything but the decision of a predator to prey on someone they have identified as vulnerable. Trying to make a distinction between “big bad rapists” and “ordinary people” perpetuates rape culture by suggesting that only monstrous people commit rape, rather than ordinary people with monstrous ideas. We have to constantly reinforce the idea that it doesn’t matter how “promising” you might be, once you make the decision to prey on someone else you become a rapist. Only that decision is relevant to the discussion.

They committed rape. That makes them rapists.

That being said, the majority of men are not violent

Rape doesn’t have to involve physical violence or extreme physical harm to still be rape. One of the factors being held against Jane Doe here is that there seems to have been very little direct physical violence, and there is now quite a lot of quibbling about how exactly she was assaulted and whether this ‘qualifies’ as rape (see above in this very thread). All of this quibbling misses the point that the decision to prey on a vulnerable person is the act that makes this rape, not the level of direct physical violence used.

The point is well taken in some ways, as studies have shown that rape is committed by a relatively small number of people, though they do tend to commit multiple rapes (no doubt constantly telling themselves that whatever they may be doing, they aren’t “big bad rapists” but just “ordinary people”).

and I am in no way excusing these two boys’ actions.

You need to be careful here, because while I agree that you don’t seem to want to excuse the predatory actions of these two rapists, you are skating very close to a line that we have to be sure to keep bright, despite the constant efforts of rape culture partisans to shade it. Seeking to make a false distinction between “big bad rapists” and “ordinary people” who are ‘duped’ by rape culture is only a slight shift from the false distinction between “big bad rapists” and ‘ordinary boys’ who were ‘duped’ by ‘bad’ girls.

There are a small number of people who rape, and a much larger number of people who are revolted by the very idea. In the middle there are too many people who excuse and apologize for rape. You should take care not to stray too close to that camp.

reginaldgriswold
reginaldgriswold
8 years ago

@Nitram-

I see what you mean, now. I can agree with that.

reginaldgriswold
reginaldgriswold
8 years ago

I want to clarify my above comment, a little. I don’t think the “rapist” label is a problem. But I do think that the way rape is talked about can be made-over in a way that doesn’t divide people into normal people and rapists – such as “Today, two Steubenville football players who raped a young woman were sentenced …” When I talk about rape, I try to incorporate other information about the rapist for the purpose of showing that rapist is one facet of their identity. One facet that was hidden from the view of the rapist’s victims, but was nonetheless there.

John-H
John-H
8 years ago

I ignored anything about this for the last few days and I wish I had ignored this as well. People suck so much.

Bad_dog
Bad_dog
8 years ago

Ok, for example if a guy takes me to his house when he is really drunk and passes out. While he is passed out I go through all his stuff, find his car keys and steal his car. He wakes up to find his car missing and calls the cops. Do you think the cops are going to tell him “well you we’re drunk and dumb so you deserve to have your car stolen”? I don’t think so. They are going to try to find me and his fucking car. * I am NOT equating stealing shit to rape, I’m jut trying to demonstrate the fucked up view some people have towards rape and towards this case.

cloudiah
8 years ago

Falconer, Those babies are still adorable; they and the kitty & puppy videos are a nice reminder that there are good things in the world.

blitzgal
8 years ago

Ok, for example if a guy takes me to his house when he is really drunk and passes out. While he is passed out I go through all his stuff, find his car keys and steal his car. He wakes up to find his car missing and calls the cops. Do you think the cops are going to tell him “well you we’re drunk and dumb so you deserve to have your car stolen”? I don’t think so. They are going to try to find me and his fucking car. * I am NOT equating stealing shit to rape, I’m jut trying to demonstrate the fucked up view some people have towards rape and towards this case.

That’s the crux of the issue. Making an arguably poor decision to drink to excess does not magically negate any crimes that are committed while you are drunk. That includes crimes that you commit, and crimes that are committed against you.

emilygoddess
emilygoddess
8 years ago

No worries, Sideliner. I was just taking your comment and running with it.

titianblue
titianblue
8 years ago

That’s the crux of the issue. Making an arguably poor decision to drink to excess does not magically negate any crimes that are committed while you are drunk. That includes crimes that you commit, and crimes that are committed against you.

Unless you’re in possession of a vagina while drunk, in which case everything criminal that happens anywhere in the world during your intoxication is your fault.

joanimal
joanimal
8 years ago

@emilygoddess and @sideliner

I agree that discussion ot the legal minutiae is a rape apologists dodge. In the U.S. there are 50 state penal codes and therefore 50 separate definitions, making any internet discussion of the law an easy and very ignorant dodge.

The crux is that rape isn’t sex. The defendents own language on the recording showed that. There was never any discussion of sex, just humilation and degradation of another person as if that was their right. “Where did the rapists get that idea from?” is the question the apologists should be attempting to answer.

joanimal
joanimal
8 years ago

Ah crap! I didn’t close the italics block correctly…

joanimal
joanimal
8 years ago

And I failed to delete the words “on the recording”

Nitram
Nitram
8 years ago

@gillian

“They committed rape. This makes them rapists. To describe them as anything else suggests that there are somehow “degrees” of rape, that rape is anything but the decision of a predator to prey on someone they have identified as vulnerable”

Yes, I see what you’re saying and I do not mean to convey that there are degrees of rape. What I’m thinking is that the term rapist conjures up a mythical figure of the monster in the shadows, and I think that myth needs to shatter for any real change to occur. It just makes me uncomfortable because it feels oversimplified? Again, I’m having trouble explaining myself. I don’t even want to spend anymore time considering these guys. Too much of that going on as it is.

Unfortunately this young girl is getting repeatedly traumatized by all this victim blaming and hurling of degrading insults. The rapists are getting an overwhelming outpouring of sympathy and moral support that should be directed at the victim. How horrible.

Nitram
Nitram
8 years ago

@reginaldgriswold

“I don’t think the “rapist” label is a problem. But I do think that the way rape is talked about can be made-over in a way that doesn’t divide people into normal people and rapists ”

Yes, this.

Gillian
Gillian
8 years ago

@Nitram (and reginaldgriswold as well)

The key in exploding that myth is not to overcomplicate. Guy hanging out in the bushes = rapist, not because of where he was hiding or what he was wearing, but because he forced sexual activity onto someone. Football player in the backseat of his friend’s car = rapist, not because of what he does in his afterschool hours, but because he forced sexual activity onto someone.

The key in exploding that myth is to remind people that it is a myth. Rapists are predators who use the myth to excuse their own behavior, to argue that they couldn’t be a rapist because they are a “nice” person from a “nice” family and they don’t go around skulking in bushes.

@reginaldgriswold

I just don’t see your point. I’m not concerned with any other aspect of a person’s life when it comes to whether or not they committed rape, because in my experience the only intention behind bringing up other facts about them is to mitigate or explain away their choice to rape (but he was a “good” boy, a homecoming king, a quarterback, her husband, her father, her priest, blah, blah, blah). I do know that plenty of rapists who commit rape repeatedly (and admit it, so long as the word ‘rape’ isn’t used, see the above links) don’t consider and aren’t going to proudly ‘identify’ themselves as rapists to make you feel better about it all.

Part of fighting rape culture is refusing to allow the issue to be clouded. The way to avoid a specious distinction between “rapists” and “normal people” is not to make one. Committing rape makes a person a rapist. What justification they apply to it doesn’t matter.

It isn’t oversimplification, it just really is that simple.

Some Gal Not Bored at All

@Gillian

Hear, hear!

Gillian
Gillian
8 years ago

Ugh. And I shouldn’t, in my anger and frustration, make the mistake to forget male rape victims, sorry.

reginaldgriswold
reginaldgriswold
8 years ago

@Gillian-

I think it’s important to bring up because people have this idea that a rapist is a slavering beast. That they have a scarlet R on their forehead; that you can see them a mile away.

This isn’t true, and it colors the way people talk about rape. Rapists are out there, in society, being fathers, waiters, and teachers. But how often do you read coverage of rape that says “Oh, well, he or she should have known better to be alone with that monster?” Perhaps you don’t, but I hear this very often on the news or the internet. I think it’s important to continually highlight that these aren’t people who are off somewhere else; they’re here, in your community. Someone can be a librarian and rape someone. Someone can work with your kids and still rape people. It’s not just monsters who are easily identified who are rapists. The only way to fight rape culture is to make it known that literally anyone, whether they’re an athlete or an accountant, can be a rapist.

Gillian
Gillian
8 years ago

@reginaldgriswold I know that message is everywhere and I’m sorry you hear it (by which I mean that I am sorry it exists), but that’s not what I’m saying. I’m explicitly agreeing with you that anyone can be a rapist, and I’m only disagreeing that the tactic is useful.

The “even a librarian can be a rapist” message is only going to aggravate librarians and get pushback from people who might otherwise be on your side even though it is actually and demonstrably true. Identity messages are structurally divisive and historically unproductive, and therefore rhetorically unhelpful, especially so because you have conceded to fight on, with respect, the wrong terms. If you go down that road, you’ll be fighting people’s self perceptions and defenses for long before you get to the individual rapist’s actions because no one wants to feel attacked and they will reflexively respond even if they might actually agree with you about the horrible crime of rape.

It is more productive and effective, in my experience, to sidestep the mythology and go directly to the point. “But he was an athlete and a good boy!” “Maybe so, but he picked up a girl and carried her from place to place, offering his friends the opportunity to assault her. He is a rapist and he needs to deal with the consequences of his actions.”

But I think we are talking at cross purposes even though we share some common ground, so we can leave it at that.

cloudiah
8 years ago

@Gillian, I think you put that very well.

CassandraSays
CassandraSays
8 years ago

@ Nitram

No. A rapist is a person who has raped someone. Referring to someone by a term that describes what they did in a very clear way is not the same thing as buying into the slavering beast myth. In fact, you’ve got things exactly backwards – refusing the label these boys as rapists supports the slavering beast myth, because part of what upholds that myth is the refusal to admit that rape is common and rapists are all around us, just walking around looking like everyone else.

Fade
Fade
8 years ago

Don’t really have much to contribute to the conversation, but seconding CassandraSays about a rapist is someone who has committed rape. And the whole not wanting to call people who commit rapists rape thing is making me very uncomfortable.

CassandraSays
CassandraSays
8 years ago

I can’t help but wondering if what’s bothering people is the permanence of it, and they want a way for the label to be removed if the person doesn’t do it again. But the thing is, if you’ve raped someone, you are a rapist. You don’t become not-a-rapist as a result of rehabilitation.

Basically this all feels like a way to try to avoid acknowledging how common rape is and how hard rapists are to identify until they actually hurt someone and you find out about it. And refusing to say “yep, that guy over there is a rapist” just contributes to the culture in which everything gets swept under the rug and victims who call out their attackers are shamed for making everyone uncomfortable.

ostara321
ostara321
8 years ago

Basically this all feels like a way to try to avoid acknowledging how common rape is and how hard rapists are to identify until they actually hurt someone and you find out about it. And refusing to say “yep, that guy over there is a rapist” just contributes to the culture in which everything gets swept under the rug and victims who call out their attackers are shamed for making everyone uncomfortable.

YEP. Avoiding calling a rapist a rapist contributes to the cultural idea that there are “rapists” and then just guys who rape. That is bullshi. A rapist is a rapist is a rapist.

Marie
Marie
8 years ago

“Taking advantage” of someone, by the way, is my least favourite euphemism for rape. You take advantage of lucky opportunities that arise in your life, like when that sweater you’ve wanted for a month goes on sale. Or you take advantage of your friend’s good mood when deciding when to ask her for that favour you’ve been wanting. You don’t “take advantage” of someone being drunk and passed out, like it’s some sort of happy accident that’s happened to you. You make the conscious decision to assault and rape them.

QFT

In the past quarter century, we exposed biases against other races and called it racism, and we exposed biases against women and called it sexism. Biases against men we call humor.
—Warren Farrell, Women Can’t Hear What Men Don’t Say

ow. My head hurts from all the face palm.

And this girl’s getting death threats. The media may have shielded her name but everyone in her community knows who she is.

o fuck I don’t wanna live on this planet any more 🙁 🙁 🙁 🙁 gaaaaa grrrr rant.

@tina

So the next time a teen boy slut gets drunk at a party: drug him, ….

Idk. I feel like lots of rape culture where I am (America) is still pretty biased against boys. A girl who is raped should have known better than to be drinking while female, or of course the boys can’t help it (*barfs*) but I do feel like (in America) there’s lots of men can’t be raped thoughts because men aren’t supposed to be vulnerable, and men are supposed to always want sex. Idk, /rambling.

It seems to me that if the situation would be flipped around that nobody but a few would care

I agree, it probably wouldn’t have gotten as much press :/ (assuming that’s what you were trying to say)

@falconer

D’awww. Your babies are so cute <3

@marinerachel

I actually do feel sad for the rapists in this case

You’re probably a better person than me then. :/ All I can think is that no matter how bad they feel, well good. But I’m a vindictive bitch.

@nitram

I get uncomfortable with the description of these perps as “rapists” because it sears in our mind this pervasive myth that rapists are monsters and monsters are rapists. These boys are a product of rape culture.

um, yes, rapists are a product of rape culture . They’re still rapists though. And shitty ass people. Culture may make it more common, but it does not make it excusable.

and I am in no way excusing these two boys’ actions.

I guess the first part just seemed like that to me :/ Though I’m glad you clarified (in the actual comment too) I just had to comment on it. Sorry if it bugs you.

In short, “rapist” sort of neatly categorizes the problem. “He’s a rapist”, that’s what he does. Why are otherwise good people doing heinous acts? Why are we not horrified? I hope I’m explaining this clearly.

Otherwise good? Dang, I feel like I’m too vindictive to say much here, since I seem to be much more pissed than lots of people at them (though not all people here!) Also, I can’t tell if you’re not exlaining it clearly, or my brain’s just wonky today 😛 could be that last one, since I feel like I’m not getting you at all.

What I’m thinking is that the term rapist conjures up a mythical figure of the monster in the shadows, and I think that myth needs to shatter for any real change to occur.

Yeah, but part of rape culture is the ‘xie can’t be a rapist, xie is a good person, not a monster.’ I don’t think avoiding calling rapists rapists will help at all, only add to that myth. If I’m making any sense today.

CassandraSays
CassandraSays
8 years ago

These are not big bad rapists.

Take a look at the picture again. Those are rapists. That is what a rapist looks like. They look just like everyone else. Sometimes (disturbingly often, in the case of participants in certain sports) they look like “promising young men”*.

*Think carefully about why you used that phrase and what it means as a culture that many people still see those boys that way even after they conclusively proved that they’re capable of harming someone else just for shits and giggles.

hellkell
hellkell
8 years ago

No. A rapist is a person who has raped someone. Referring to someone by a term that describes what they did in a very clear way is not the same thing as buying into the slavering beast myth. In fact, you’ve got things exactly backwards – refusing the label these boys as rapists supports the slavering beast myth, because part of what upholds that myth is the refusal to admit that rape is common and rapists are all around us, just walking around looking like everyone else.

QFT

cloudiah
8 years ago

MKP over at The Spreadhead has uncovered the really troubling aspect of this case:

Having said that, it’s amazing that no one – especially women – care to address one of the most vital points of the story: the fact that loud, drunk, aggressive, criminal or borderline-criminal football players like this get all the sex they can handle, while polite, respectful young men routinely go home alone. How many girls do you think these big, tough jocks have fucked in the last 3 years? And how many girls do you think their nerdy classmates – the ones who would NEVER do something like this – have been with in the same period? Or, hell, their entire lives?

Fucking asshats.

The Kittehs' Unpaid Help

Do we have trouble calling a murderer a murderer? Do we have trouble calling a burglar a burglar? Why should we not call rapists what they are? Why is the term so terrible that we should flinch from calling a rapist a rapist? Fuck that. Fuck protecting them because they’re not big monster rapists. That’s exactly what they are. Never mind the leaping-out-of-bushes scenario: the minute you rape someone you are monstrous, whatever the circumstances, whatever the level of overt or visible violence (rape is a crime of violence however it’s perpretrated) – to rape someone is a monstrous thing. Too many humans are good at monstrous.

As for sympathy for these rapists … never. Not from me. Nothing forced them into the crappy US justice system. Nothing forced them to rape that girl. They weren’t caught up in some stupid Kantian ethical dilemma. They chose to do a monstrous thing to another human being.

CassandraSays
CassandraSays
8 years ago

I’m starting to wonder if “incel” is a synonym for “no sense of appropriateness at all”.

Marie
Marie
8 years ago

@cloudiah

@_@ wow………. that spearhead comment. >:( No words

melodyraewood
melodyraewood
8 years ago

Wait….Most people rape, urinate, and drive an unconscious woman to different parties?

WTF kind of logic is that. Any man/woman who says that is what people should do is not somebody I want to be around .

titianblue
titianblue
8 years ago

Yep, that Spearhead comment – because we’re all actually wondering how many girls these big, tough jocks have raped in the last 3 years.

Some Gal Not Bored at All

@cloudiah

Leave it to them to identify the “real” victims. How awful that so many young women are forcibly leaving the nerds alone. There’s nothing worse than having to wait until after HS to get laid. I did it and it destroyed my life so much that I am perfectly fine.

*headdesk*

Marie
Marie
8 years ago

@somegal

I did it and it destroyed my life so much that I am perfectly fine.

not getting laid until after HS has definitely destroyed my life. So much that I’m out of high school and not-laid I’ve the best I’ve been in years*

*actually getting diagnosed for depression does wonders 😛

CassandraSays
CassandraSays
8 years ago

You know, I don’t think I know anyone who’s ever kidnapped a drunk, unconscious person, driven them around to various parties so they could be assaulted, and peed on them (without their permission, while they were still unconscious). And I’ve been to lots of parties where people have passed out drunk. So I have to kind of question the “any guy would do the same” aspect of the brodude’s tweet above.

Feminists – having a higher opinion of men as a group than misogynists do since at least the 60s.

hellkell
hellkell
8 years ago

The Spearhead never lets you down just when you think worse things can’t be said.

hellkell
hellkell
8 years ago

I was thinking today just how tired this story makes me feel. It’s been 25 years of bullshit: Tawana Brawley, Mike Tyson, Anita Hill, William Smith, Bill Clinton, Srauss-Kahn, Assange, I’m sure I’m forgetting some case, but it all seems to boil down to “bitches ain’t shit” and I am tired.

AK
AK
8 years ago

Josiah’s comment in the screenshot makes me think of the Shakesville piece about why rape jokes are so bad (my Google is failing me, so I’m paraphrasing badly): “When you make a rape joke, decent guys will know you’re joking, but rapists will take it as confirmation that rape is normal and every guy does it. And since you don’t know who is a rapist unless they’re caught…”

I’m another woman who has been falling-down drunk around lots of guys and not been raped. I’ve even had sex with guys I’m in established relationships with (and had established that we’re both okay with drunk sex), and somehow they managed to still be respectful and not rape me. In fact, I’ve even had a drunk boyfriend I was with literally say, “Hey, you don’t seem as into this as you usually are. Want to stop?” So no, Josiah, not all guys are rapists.

On the other hand, the time I was raped, there was a big difference: I was with a rapist. Funny how that’s what actually made the difference and not what I’d had to drink or what I was wearing or anything else except that I happened to be around someone who wanted to rape me and felt that he had the opportunity to do so without consequence.

AK
AK
8 years ago

I want to add that I didn’t mean that last paragraph as anything against any woman who doesn’t press charges against a rapist who attacks her…I’ve been there myself and I know all the reasons not to or why it may not even be possible if there’s not enough physical evidence. I just wanted to acknowledge what she did, without casting judgment on anyone else as every case is different. Just to be clear on that, since I know this is a sensitive topic (and for good reason).

cloudiah
8 years ago

Update: That MKP comment from the Spearhead that I posted now has 11 upvotes, making it by far the most popular comment on the post — and the rest of the comments have devolved into racism and worse.

hellkell
hellkell
8 years ago

Fabulous.

ostara321
ostara321
8 years ago

Having said that, it’s amazing that no one – especially women – care to address one of the most vital points of the story: the fact that loud, drunk, aggressive, criminal or borderline-criminal football players like this get all the sex they can handle, while polite, respectful young men routinely go home alone. How many girls do you think these big, tough jocks have fucked in the last 3 years? And how many girls do you think their nerdy classmates – the ones who would NEVER do something like this – have been with in the same period? Or, hell, their entire lives?

Yes, so amazing that no one gives a shit about the poor unfucked boners. Women are getting raped and pissed on but there are DUDES! Not getting LAID! It is HORRIBLE! It is the biggest tragedy of our times! /sarcasm

CassandraSays
CassandraSays
8 years ago

How many girls do you think these big, tough jocks have fucked in the last 3 years?

Funny how it never even occurs to them to wonder how many of the girls who those guys “had sex with” they actually raped. Or maybe they just don’t think it matters.

Roosh the Douche
Roosh the Douche
8 years ago

Silly manboobzers. Alphas never rape women. Our panties just magically drop in their presence, and our vaginas automatically become red and inflamed like a hyenas, so no consent is necessary. Conversely, in the presence of nice guys, our vaginas fold in on themselves like a collapsed star.

Roosh the Douche
Roosh the Douche
8 years ago

And that was sarcasm, for anyone who didn’t already know.

Viscaria
Viscaria
8 years ago

@Hellkell:

I was thinking today just how tired this story makes me feel. It’s been 25 years of bullshit: Tawana Brawley, Mike Tyson, Anita Hill, William Smith, Bill Clinton, Srauss-Kahn, Assange, I’m sure I’m forgetting some case, but it all seems to boil down to “bitches ain’t shit” and I am tired.

…Yeah. All of this. I feel this sort of numb despair.

And how many girls do you think their nerdy classmates – the ones who would NEVER do something like this – have been with in the same period? Or, hell, their entire lives?

Refraining from rape is not noble. It’s really not something to wave about like it makes you some sort of moral exemplar. I haven’t murdered anyone, but I don’t go around demanding that women praise me for it. Not do I expect them to fuck me for it.

Also even if you did do something noble and self-sacrificing – like, I dunno, pull a baby from a burning building – it is not a sad story when nobody rewards you for it with a faceful of genitals.