Categories
antifeminism evil fat fatties heartiste I'm totally being sarcastic kitties men who should not ever be with women ever misogyny MRA PUA racism reddit twitter

#TellAFeministThankYou fends off a manosphere manvasion!

Kittens composing feminist tweets.
Kittens composing feminist tweets.

The twitter hashtag wars continue! Apparently still pissed off that feminists pooped on their #INeedMasculismBecause tag the other day, the dudes of the manosphere launched a little counterattack aimed at #TellAFeministThankYou, a hashtag originally started by Melissa McEwan of Shakesville to give an opportunity to feminists to thank other feminists for, you know, being awesome and stuff.

On Chateau Heartiste, the Heartiste formerly known as Roissy charged up the troops for the campaign.

[T]he #TellAFeministThankYou Twitter feed has morphed into a shooting gallery for the entertainment of trolls and assorted sadists, providing a laugh a second. Feminists on that feed have been reduced to impotently bleating “wait for them to get it out of their systems.”

Go for the fun, stay for the cruelty. And keep an eye out for malevolent forces committing drive-bys of spectacular carnage. The kind of carnage that can leave a feminist with barely enough strength to mewl for the sympathies and circle-wagoning of fellow travelers.

There was just one problem: The PUAs and MRAs and other assorted Red Pill tweeters forgot to have a sense of humor.

Heartiste tried his best to generate some hilarity with a few tweets of his own.

twfh1twfh2twf3

Such magnificent wit!

Evidently feeling he needed to kick it up a notch, he decided to add some sprinkles of racism:

twfhracist

See, cuz only guys with names like “Juan” and “Anfernee” (hint, hint, hint) harass women on the street!

Here are some contributions from some other Red Pill wits, which evidently were highly amusing to the dudes in the RedPill Subreddit:

twfo1twfo2twfo3

And a couple of others I found on my own:

twfm1twfm2

There were even a few directed at little old me, like this one from our friend Chuck at Gucci Little Piggy:

twfgucci

You’re welcome!

Flawless victory, guys!

Oh, and here are some more kitties, since they seem to annoy manosphere dudes so much.

1558126444_7fdd153cd22778870314_df6e557d775224934736_f5ca46fbe7_o

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

294 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
cloudiah
8 years ago

Oh, and while I disapprove of most dog breeding and think people should just adopt shelter dogs, there are some pretty cute doggie pictures here (NYT). I have to admire Cooper the Skye Terrier’s grooming.

Bagelsan
Bagelsan
8 years ago

@Some Gal: Don’t worry, I got the joke! 😀

Some Gal Not Bored at All

@cloudiah

I read a lot of mysteries, but don’t know that anyone here is into those.

I read a lot more mysteries in my teenage years, especially Mary Higgins Clark. *blushes, too*

Now, I read Jim Butcher, Jasper Fforde, and a lot of random stuff. I don’t know if those count as the sort of mystery you read, though.

(Although I do most of my “reading” by audiobook because I have trouble concentrating on big blocks of text either from the meds or the pain. If anyone has any recommendations for well-performed audiobooks, I’m all ears. 🙂 )

cloudiah
8 years ago

Kittehs’ I really like Ruth Rendell/Barbara Vine, PD James, and Reginald Hill. Tana French too, although one of hers I thought was too far-fetched for belief. And for something of a cross between mystery/spy/adventure, Mark Mills and Robert Goddard.

katz
8 years ago

I had a crush on Lord Peter Wimsey as a kid 🙂

hellkell
hellkell
8 years ago

I didn’t like The Graduate at all, but yes, it was very well done technically.

Katz, have you seen Carnal Knowledge? Waaaaaaaay more problematic (there’s our favorite word again), but I found it more engaging than The Graduate. Jack Nicholson as proto-PUA.

The Kittehs' Unpaid Help

I can’t recall the name, but I saw a feminist mystery writer recommended on The Otherness of Alice blog and took a look at the book, which sounded good (archaeology + murder mystery) … and it was written in present tense. Gah, it went back on the shelf immediately! I don’t mind present tense in a short story (Ramsay Campbell’s Conversion comes to mind) but for a whole book?

katz
8 years ago

Jack Nicholson just gravitates to problematic projects, doesn’t he?

cloudiah
8 years ago

I also read a lot of non-fiction, mostly history stuff particularly about southern CA and/or African American history. I work with photograph (mostly) collections, so I get intrigued by things I see and go read more. So yeah, random.

Latest interest: Our Gang/Little Rascals, and Mabel Stark (lion tamer).

hellkell
hellkell
8 years ago

Yes, he does.

Kiwi girl
Kiwi girl
8 years ago

@Kitteh I wasn’t attracted by the premise of The Full Monty, so have never watched the show. A recent show that is attracting my attention is Fry’s Planet Word. I am also patiently waiting for season 1 of Connections to reduce in price to much more reasonable figure. I have seasons 2 and 3, and a number of his books. This is the series that encouraged my love for science as a child.

The Kittehs' Unpaid Help

I can’t abide Jack Nicholson. Don’t think I’ve ever seen a film with him in it that I liked. And how the hell he got picked to play chunky redhead Randle McMurphy I’ll never know.

cloudiah – most of Mum’s and my books are non-fiction. French history (no prizes for guessing which period), English history, archaeology, fashion history, jewellery, Formula One, cats, art history …

The Kittehs' Unpaid Help

I started watching Planet Word, but lost interest. I’m a bit over Stephen Fry.

Did anyone here watch Black Books? Now that’s a weird show. 😀

katz
8 years ago

Kitteh, you didn’t like Chinatown?

cloudiah
8 years ago

Loved Chinatown. Jack Nicholson in The Shining was pretty good too. I used to love Stephen King…

Has anyone read Hilary Mantel’s books? My sister keeps bugging me to read them

katz
8 years ago

The whole trick is to cast Jack Nicholson as someone who’s supposed to be creepy-problematic.

katz
8 years ago

Like so.

The Kittehs' Unpaid Help

katz, no, never saw Chinatown.

cloudiah
8 years ago

I just saw that Emergency! is available on Hulu. I had such a crush on Randolph Mantooth when I was younger. [cloudiah fans herself]

Kiwi girl
Kiwi girl
8 years ago

@katz, I found the Keith Moon character (Uncle Ernie) in the film to be much more problematic (that word again!). And cousin Kevin, and Frank Hobbs. I can also never look at baked beans in quite the same way….

The Kittehs' Unpaid Help

That jackass Purple Star is trying to necro another thread with non-sequiturs. Trolls, nothing if not predictable.

The Kittehs' Unpaid Help

Tommy’s another film I couldn’t sit through. Nearly died of boredom and ended up speeding through to catch Elton John’s Pinball Wizard scene.

katz
8 years ago

Tommy’s another film I couldn’t sit through. Nearly died of boredom and ended up speeding through to catch Elton John’s Pinball Wizard scene.

Really? Wow.

Kiwi girl
Kiwi girl
8 years ago

I get the earworm “Christmas” from Tommy every couple of Xmases. That means I have to watch the entire movie just to get rid of it.

The Kittehs' Unpaid Help

Yeah. I was in my twenties when I saw it and it was just totally not my thing. I only recorded it to see the Pinball Wizard sequence, and the rest of it just … oh, no, no way.

Creative Writing Student

I hated The Shining film. I’m a big fan of the book, and especially the depth given to Jack Torrance. I like the emotional progression he was given, he starts wanting to recover from his abusive childhood, his abusive nature, and his alcoholism. As the book goes on he (and Danny) enter into an abusive relationship with the genius locus of the Overlook Hotel. The hotel itself is very manipulative and seeks to cut them off from the world, turn against each other, twist perceptions of events – if it had been a person rather than a genius locus then it would be seen as abusive and toxic.
Then even at the end you can see good!Jack still trying to get through the roque-mallet-weilding monster. You remember the start of the book, and you see him again at the end, and it breaks your heart even as you’re throughly creeped out by the Hotel.

The film… yeah, some good film techniques and stuff, but Jack Nicholson looks less “troubled, alcoholic, depressed” mentally ill and more “I am a danger to any human who crosses my path” mentally ill, and they cut a lot of the relationship development – it’s just set up and payoff. It relies on cheaper form of horror and doesn’t touch the more complex areas of the mind. As a story, it’s shit.

Creative Writing Student

Sorry, I really like the Shining. It has a massive emotional impact on me, and it’s what I’d call an example of a “good early novel”. The film really pissed me off.

Kiwi girl
Kiwi girl
8 years ago

I’m not a fan of Stephen King. I used to read the books as a teenager but his writing seemed to get more disturbing over time so I quit after It.

Some Gal Not Bored at All

@Creative Writing Student

I totally agree about The Shining. I actually like the television miniseries so much more than the “classic” because Torrence is less over the top and there is so much more time. (Still not as good as the book, though. 🙂 )

pecunium
8 years ago

I like mysteries. Robert B. Parker, Rex Stout (the Nero Wolfe stories, none of the rest work for me). Sayers, Christie.

I read a collaboration Clark did with her daughter. I thought it awful, but no where near as bad as James Patterson (the things one will read when deployed). Doyle is, of course, brilliant.

Niven, for those who are interested in SF did a credible job of mysteries with “Gil the ARM”.

For Movies With Nicholson, “The Raven” is fun. Karloff, Lorre and Nicholson in his debut film role, young and innocent.

I liked him in, “As Good as it Gets”. But Greg Kinnear is almost always worth watching, and Helen Hunt was great.

The Shining… KUbrick’s greatest fail. Removing the heroic figure halfway through… utter contempt for the material, and a fair bit for the audience.

cloudiah
8 years ago

The movie of The Shining wasn’t nearly as good as the book, but I liked it just because it did actually scare me to watch it.

cloudiah
8 years ago

Also because I have a soft spot for scene-chewing over-acting.

thebewilderness
thebewilderness
8 years ago

Nicholson has always seemed to me to be one of those actors who always played themselves no matter what the part. Rather like John Wayne.
I thought he was brilliant in Cuckoos Nest. But then in the next film I saw, which he had done earlier, he was the same character, and in the next the same and the next and the next.
It wasn’t type casting, I don’t think. It was simply his narrow range.

Integral
Integral
8 years ago

cloudiah, I think Randolph Mantooth might have been my first crush when I was about four or so. Either him or Batgirl, anyway, I’m not sure.

pecunium
8 years ago

OMG. Batgirl. Before I was aware of sex, per se I had the hots for her.

leftwingfox
8 years ago

Falconer: ‘sok. Not angry at you, just frustrated with my brain at times.

The Kittehs' Unpaid Help

I couldn’t get all that into King. The Stand was okay, first (possibly only) time I read it in full. Salem’s Lot I found pretty disappointing. His writing seemed flat at times.

Ellex
Ellex
8 years ago

@Some Gal

If you like Jim Butcher (I’m assuming Dresden Files, I have some problems with his other series coming across as a bit derivative), I wonder if you’ve read Tanya Huff’s Blood series and Smoke trilogy? You need to read the Blood series before the Smoke trilogy. I really enjoyed the Smoke trilogy on audiobook (after reading the books multiple times). Unfortunately, the audiobooks for the Blood series suffer from a really poor narrator.

@cloudiah

Have you read Elizabeth George? She’s probably right up your alley.

@Kittehs

Try Lillian Jackson Braun’s “The Cat Who” books, but be warned that by around “The Cat Who Saw Stars”, she had clearly mined the series for all it was worth. The first 5 books are the best, IMO. They’re just fun to read.

Since you like Lord Peter Wimsey, I recommend the Albert Campion books by Margery Allingham, which are simply excellent.

And to get marginally back on topic, the ONLY film I’ve ever seen that really treated rape and it’s aftermath anything like realistically is the classic Jodie Foster film “The Accused”.

The Kittehs' Unpaid Help

Thanks for those tips, Ellex! “The Cat Who” is tempting as a title all on its own. 😀

::scribbles furiously on post-it note::

Some Gal Not Bored at All

@Ellex

Thanks. I’ll add it to my list of books to check out. (I actually loved the Codex Alera series, too, but Dresden Files is still going so that is what I’m reading now.)

hippodameia8527
hippodameia8527
8 years ago

I haven’t seen Ian Rankin’s name come up yet, so I’ll add him to the mix. I would recommend skipping at least the first two Rebus novels, though. He really hits his stride around his sixth book.

Carrie Nelson-Douglas had a good Irene Adler series going for a while, although the narrator could get irritating. (Stop after book four.)

Ellex
Ellex
8 years ago

ARGH, you’re all talking about books. Do you have any notion what a temptation that is to me? Seriously, there is a room in my house that we call “The Library”, and it really is filled with books.

Re: Stephen King: IMO, The Dead Zone and Firestarter are his best. I really enjoyed The Stand, as well. I’ve read very little from Insomnia on, but as a chronic insomniac, no way was I going to read a book about someone with insomnia. I avoid that kind of masochism, thank you.

People keep recommending the Dark Tower series to me, but I just can’t seem to get into it.

Some of Dean Koontz’s books are good. I appreciate the difference between Koontz and King insofar as seeing the innate goodness or evilness in people. His book “The Taking” is really intriguing. I don’t recommend reading any extensive summary before reading it, because there’s a sort of twist at the end regarding what happened to the characters.

If anyone likes the classics – meaning H.P. Lovecraft – Algernon Blackwood is so much better. Hard to find, though. Some of his books and short stories are on the Gutenberg site.

The film version of The Shining (the Kubrick version) is one of those films no one will watch with me (although it’s not one of my favorite films anyway). People look at me strange when the blood comes pouring out and down the hall and I whisper “oh that’s so cool.”

But then, I thought “The Silence of the Lambs” was supposed to be a black comedy, so…

cloudiah
8 years ago

I would have expected to like Elizabeth George, but oddly enough I don’t. You’re right about those early “The Cat Who” books being delightful.

The Kittehs' Unpaid Help

Ellex, I know what you mean about having no space! The one thing that has me thinking I’ll have to get a Kindle or e-reader or whatever is that I really don’t have room for more books. Plus, sooner or later Mum and I are going to have to move to a retirement village, if we can get in, and that means drastically downsizing.

Anyone got any recommendations on the e-reader/Kindle front?

cloudiah
8 years ago

Ian Rankin is pretty great. Oh, and Carl Hiaasen (Hiassen?) — can’t be bothered to look it up — has some pretty hilarious books. Lee Child is a guilty pleasure for over-the-top/unrealistic action.

I love all the noir stuff too: Chandler, et al. I’m drawing a blank, but Black Lizard press reissued a bunch of good titles. The gender politics are mostly terrible, but reflect their times…

thebewilderness
thebewilderness
8 years ago

The Bachman books that King wrote were good, I thought. I am not a big fan of horror for horror sake. The Shining was the only book of his that frightened me, but that was because of the abuse triggers which I had no idea what were at the time.

Creative Writing Student

@Kitteh’s

My boyfriend swears by the Kindle Paperwhite, it’s designed so it’s more like reading from a real book. It is very comfortable to read from and is pretty quick in terms of page-turning times.

thebewilderness
thebewilderness
8 years ago

The gutenberg project has a ton of great stuff to download.
http://www.gutenberg.org/

Ellex
Ellex
8 years ago

My mother and I have been delving back into our childhoods lately and reading “The Five Little Peppers and How They Grew” (turns out it’s a series) and the Bobbsey Twins books. Thanks to the Gutenberg website, early and original versions of the Bobbsey Twins series are available.

I need to get on the stick and read the last Pendergast novel from Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child; I also have several of Robert Stevensons’ Donald Strachey mysteries waiting for me. That damn “to read” pile just gets bigger and bigger…

@hippo…

I hope you don’t mind my shortening your name. Hippos are awesome creatures, though.

I love Nelson-Douglas’ Irene Adler series, although you’re right that the later books are not as good. Laurie King’s Mary Russell series is good, too, but I wasn’t impressed with the last book.

@Some Gal

Have you tried Lynn Flewelling’s books? If you like the Codex Alera series (don’t get me wrong, they’re as well written as everything else Butcher does – I just get too much of a “fated to be” sense from them. I may go back and try them again sometime, though) you should like both the Nightrunner series and the Tamir trilogy.

Kiwi girl
Kiwi girl
8 years ago

I have the Kindle keyboard, and I’ve used it for about 3 years now, it’s brilliant for travelling. I didn’t get a cover with a light, but I can read it without the airline light on, or in bed I just use the bedside lamp. The battery lasts for ages. Unfortunately there are some technical books that won’t work with it, and I was thinking the Kindle Fire, but the negative reviews of the 8.9″ screen have put me off and I don’t think I want to pay a lot of cash for getting a 7″ screen instead. So I’m holding off for a bit.

You can change the font size too. I’m reading the 5-book Game of Thrones series on it, still on book 3. It’s nice to read on the train, I see a lot of people reading ebooks on the train now.