Categories
antifeminism evil women false accusations hypocrisy I'm totally being sarcastic men who should not ever be with women ever misandry misogyny MRA reddit violence against men/women

Men’s Rights Redditors: Guys who kill their exes — who can blame them?

A couple of intriguing quotes from Reddit’s Men’s Rights subreddit.

The topic at hand: A Redditor claims an ex falsely accused him of rape and caused him various other problems and basically acted like a shit. No one, of course, can possibly know if the guy is telling the truth, but the r/mr regulars all assume the alleged false accuser is guilty until proven innocent. (And maybe not even then.)

Naturally, some of the regulars use this as an opportunity to discuss how completely understandable it is when guys kill their exes.

Really, in this misandrist world, dudes murdering their exes is totally like slaves murdering their masters. Illegal, sure, but who can blame them? At least that’s how texaswildfires sees it:

 

Yep, in his mind, dudes today are totally in the exact same situation as slaves in the antebellum south — so when a guy murders his ex, the person you should feel empathy with is the murderer.

Naturally, both of these comments got upvotes, because that’s just how r/mr rolls these days.

 

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

290 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Pecunium
9 years ago

Dave, if you could fix that blockquote failure, I’d really like it.

🙂

If not, it’s still readable.

ithiliana
9 years ago

@Pecunium: Heavens, using Brandon’s own words against him!

What fallacy is that now ;>

Pecunium
9 years ago

ithiliana: I think it’s either ad logicum or ad rhetorica

Pecunium
9 years ago

:0 🙂 😀

kirbywarp
kirbywarp
9 years ago

… Heyyy, wait a second… Some of those are my words!!! :O

Words that probably were a bit off the mark. >.> Ah well.

(the “Brandon, like most MRAs, thinks…” bit)

ithiliana
9 years ago

@Kirbywarp: there was html fail, and I admit to not reading in great detail (sneaking in before work!). Or even going back to the original and reading carefully!

Pecunium
9 years ago

Kirby, yes, they are. But they aren’t the one’s he was denying.

kristinmh
kristinmh
9 years ago

I feel we have reached a troll equilibrium here, where Brandon will continue to be ridiculous and we will continue to mock him.

I’m ok with that, though I too wonder exactly what he gets out of it.

KathleenB
KathleenB
9 years ago

I’m in it for the mocking, myself. I have to keep my smartass skills honed somewhere when my character isn’t mouthing off to her Caern Alpha in out Werewolf game.

Actual quote from the game, after the Wyrm’s eye appeared (it’s a sign of the game world’s apocalypse):

Alpha: Fuck me sideways.
Me (one of the lowest ranked member of the Caern who the Alpha could eat for breakfast): Thanks for the offer, but you’re really not my type.

There was almost a minute of stunned silence from the GM and the rest of the table.

KathleenB
KathleenB
9 years ago

dear gods, my kingdom for a spell checker that can ferret out my stupid assed typos! That should read OUR Werewolf game, not OUT. Two hours of sleep, I has it.

Wetherby
Wetherby
9 years ago

That reminds me of the time when both my wife and a senior colleague had a favourite phrase that went “fuck a duck!”.

With my wife, I’d respond with a strangulated quacking sound, as though an entirely innocent duck had been suddenly assaulted from behind while minding its own business. With my colleague, of course, I said nothing.

Apart from the time when I forgot.

Fortunately, she saw the funny side.

Seraph
Seraph
9 years ago

Kathleen – were you a ragabash? If so, you could probably avoid getting killed too much if you could claim “Just doin’ my job”.

hellkell
hellkell
9 years ago

I feel we have reached a troll equilibrium here, where Brandon will continue to be ridiculous and we will continue to mock him.

I’m ok with that, though I too wonder exactly what he gets out of it.

If he wants to keep digging, I’m more than happy to hand him the shovel.

Amphitrite
Amphitrite
9 years ago

I really hate to use anecdotal information again, but hey, I’ve had an exciting (though obviously mythological to most MRAs) life. I’m not one Julie mentioned that gets to talk about what a hypothetical situation abuse is.

How’s this one? Let’s go with the frog metaphor.

At one point, a few years ago, my brother and I found ourselves in relationships that had heated up past “warm water” to a good “roiling boil” of abusiveness; him with his fiance, me with my husband.

Both relationships had started out normal enough to BE a relationship. As time passed, both our partners grew territorial, then possessive, then uber critical, until physical force got played in.

Get that? A male using violent physical force against a woman (me) and a female attacking a male (my brother). We watched responses to our similar situations side by side.

For my brother, people were both outraged and embarrassed when he talked about it. Embarrassed that a big, adult male would not only admit to getting physically and emotionally battered by a female, but that it was traumatic enough to cause him distress. Outraged, ’cause, hey abuse.

For me, a similar reaction, outrage – check, but with a dash of “But you guys are the best couple EVER! Counseling! Men get stressed!”

We both fought opposition to ending the relationships. We were lucky we had each other to lean on, to understand. We jumped out of the proverbial pot rather than get cooked. We both carry some nasty burns.

It really isn’t about gender. It’s no more about gender, than it should be about race, orientation, socioeconomic level, personal experience/knowledge, or religious or non-religious belief.

Does my brother hate women or blame the whole gender for a sucky experience? Nope.
Do I hate men, etc? Nope.

Are we both aware of the poison of abuse. Hell yes. The end.

Amphitrite
Amphitrite
9 years ago

Oh, and we didn’t kill them. Oops.

KathleenB
KathleenB
9 years ago

Seraph: Sadly, no. Our group seems to have mixed up our roles. My Galliard is playing Ragabash, the Ragabash wants to be an Ahroun to fit in with the cool kids, and the Ahroun seems to be channeling a Theurge. Of course, this is a game where we had to have some sort of battle, supervised by the Master of the Challenge before a spirit would help us. We did rock, paper, scissors. My galliard composed an epic sonnet upon her victory and will recite it at the next Moot, and the not very bright spirit will forever tell the tale.

Amphitrite
Amphitrite
9 years ago

Sorry for the wall o’txt, but just to be clear, I’m not in any way demonizing people who get so stuck in that nightmare that survival tops reason. It would have been so much worse had I not had someone to turn to.

Seraph
Seraph
9 years ago

@ KathleenB: That sounds hilarious. Every time I’ve ever played Werewolf, it’s been in “mixed-world” games with vampires and mages and stuff in the party, so we never got much of a chance to really explore Garou culture.

@ Amphitrite: Don’t worry about either the wall o’ text or the content. It didn’t sound like you were demonizing anybody. It’s good that you got clear, it’s good that you (and your brother) had help, and it’s good that you’re bringing some reality to the proceedings to counter Brandon’s endless hypotheticals.

Brandon
Brandon
9 years ago

@Kirby: I didn’t leave in a huff…I went to bed. That whole “work in the morning” thing. Also, I think the emotion I mostly feel around here is mild amusement.

@Pecunium: And you attack me for reading comprehension. Let’s begin shall we:

You said:

“So yeah, you are saying, GOOOOLLLLLD! as if that will magically make things better (even though it did no such thing in the past.”

In response to these two paragraphs you quoted::

“In the end, the main problem is fiat money. Money that only derives it’s value from some intangible abstraction like “full faith and credit” is a poor way to handle monetary policy. This is why gold prices are increasing. More and more people have “less faith” in the US govt and how it manages it’s money and finances. So people are trying to maintain their purchasing power by being long gold and other metals.”

and…

“The gap between gold and a growing economy is similar to the gap between our floating money circulation and the amount of wealth of the US. The wealth of the US is much higher than the actual money that is floating. In fact, unless you want to kill the economy, you can’t have more dollars floating that are worth more than the wealth of a country.”

Let’s start with the first one:

1) The first sentence pretty much sums up my problem with the current monetary system. It’s not so much that I am a gold bug…but that i think fiat currency is susceptible to lots of swings in value because a lot of it’s value is derived from how people “feel” about the economy. Even if facts show the US government is able to pay it’s bills, all it takes is the perception that the US is growing insolvent to damage the dollar.

I am more anti-fiat currency than pro-gold. So if you have another system that isn’t fiat or gold based, I am more than happy to hear that argument.

The second paragraph:

I wasn’t even talking about gold…I was talking about the gap between floating fiat money to US wealth. The money supply and the wealth of a nation are two completely different things. And tons of people use them synonymously which is incorrect.

@Hershele: You said:

“What about a man sleeping who has said “when I wake up from my nap, I’m going to kill you”?”

That means she has even MORE incentive to get away from him ASAP. She could wait and if he was “honest” she would be accepting her own death by staying there.

If someone said to me “I am going to kill you in the morning!”…then I am going to get as far away as possible, contact the police and if it was serious ask the police to place me in protective custody.

@Kristin: Mock me all you want…it doesn’t really bother me. I think people that resort to mocking are amusing. So I could always have a few more laughs.

Nova
Nova
9 years ago

@ Brandon: Protective custody? You really think that the police do that? In the reality that the rest of the world lives in, they *might* arrest the abuser and, in some states, they hold the person until after their arraignment, if there are even charges to be filed. As for the victim, that’s what DV shelters are for. If there’s space available. If not it goes back to the notion that couples know eachother well and know where their spouses friends and family live.

VoiP
VoiP
9 years ago

If someone said to me “I am going to kill you in the morning!”…then I am going to get as far away as possible…

Think fast: you have three children under ten and if the littlest one’s routine is fucked up, she’ll start crying.

Or the person who plans to kill you has also hidden the car keys and the phone.

mythago
9 years ago

Also, I think the emotion I mostly feel around here is mild amusement.

But of course. “Who cares if I’m full of shit. I go around with a mild feeling of contemptuous superiority over all of you, so nyeah.”

Wetherby
Wetherby
9 years ago

@Brandon:

That means she has even MORE incentive to get away from him ASAP. She could wait and if he was “honest” she would be accepting her own death by staying there.

If someone said to me “I am going to kill you in the morning!”…then I am going to get as far away as possible, contact the police and if it was serious ask the police to place me in protective custody.

You may not speak English. You may not know anyone outside your immediate family and relatives, who may have already sided with your partner. You may have very young children. You may not be able to drive, or have access to the car keys, and live miles away from any public transportation. So where the hell do you go?

Several people have made points like this to you over and over and over again, yet you continue to ignore them. Which speaks volumes in itself.

darksidecat
9 years ago

Um, how are you supposed to leave the house when the other person is there, watching you, fully intending to kill you or your kids if they see you trying to leave?

Yeah, the imminence of that threat would be a slam dunk self defense case with anyone other than a partner/spouse who was doing that sort of shit to a person.

Pecunium
9 years ago

Brandon: Let’s boil this down:

You believe a floating currency is bad, yes or no?

If the answer to that is yes (which it appears to be) then we have to ask; you think a commodity based value for currency is good, yes, or no?

Because all the rest, is blather. If you think the latter (which you have said you do) you are saying GOOOLLLLLLLLD!!!!!!

All the rest is persiflage.

Hershele Ostropoler
9 years ago

Brandon:

“What about a man sleeping who has said “when I wake up from my nap, I’m going to kill you”?”

That means she has even MORE incentive to get away from him ASAP.

She’d be leaving with the clothes on her back and without the kids, then. Eventually she might want to buy something, like food. And the same people who say “why didn’t she just walk out” will say “how irresponsible of her to leave the kids with someone she knew was violent” when the inevitable happens.

I realize you don’t have kids and live off money you find on the sidewalk (because any other way of making a living involves the other people of whom you profess to be independent), but do you at least recognize intellectually that there are people about whom this is not true?

Brandon
Brandon
9 years ago

@Pecunium: My feelings towards floating money is neutral: It can be good and bad depending on what policies the government enacts and how many times they increase or decrease the money supply.

The point that I think is bad is fiat money. Paper money that gets it’s value based on peoples perception on the countries economy.

It’s like short selling a stock. The stock starts to go down, people start noticing it, people start short selling it more, stock price goes down, more people sell short, cycle continues because each time the price does down it reaffirms the current short sellers and more people take notice and the number of short sellers increases furthering the steep decline in price.

And this can happen all while the company behind the stock is doing well.

I believe in a currency system that is NOT based on the “full faith and credit” of a nation because “full faith…” is a meaningless term and is based solely on people’s perceptions (which are fickle) instead of something more tangible.

Rutee Katreya
9 years ago

He’s basically trying to say he believes in gold without admitting it. I mean really, “Instead of something more tangible.”?

Earth to Brandon: ALL ECONOMIC VALUE IS DRIVEN BY PERCEPTION. YOU ARE NOT PLAYING THE CORRECT GAME IF YOU WANT TO AVERT THIS.

Brandon
Brandon
9 years ago

@Rutee: Economic value is more than just perception. It is also based off of wants and needs both perceived and actual. While perception is an important factor…it isn’t the only factor.

Pecunium
9 years ago

Brandon: Define “floating currency”

random6x7
random6x7
9 years ago

But, until electronics, gold was useless outside of the “oooh, shiny” factor. Its worth, like diamonds, is largely because people associate it with wealth. You can’t make anything except for decorations (and electronic components, I guess?) out of it, you can’t eat it, it won’t keep you warm.

kirbywarp
kirbywarp
9 years ago

@Brandon

Did you know that the price of gold changes over time, according to how much people want it and how rare it is, or how valuable people think it is? Here is a helpful little chart. Currency is always going to be relative, be it printed or found. The market crash you’re talking about? Can happen with gold as well (and it looks like it already has in the past).

Pecunium
9 years ago

Because floating currencies can be, de facto, fiats. That’s the point I was making with my referent of the USSR. They had a “Hard” currency, for all the time they were in business. But, when they needed more money, they just printed it.

Monetary policy is the controlling factor, not the theoretical underpinning of the currency.

Take Mexico, ca. 1960. The Dollar was worth 5 pesos. But the 1 Peso coin, was a little heavier than the 1 dollar coin. So anyone who lived on the border could (and lots did) go across, trade dollars for pesos and come home, with a four dollar surplus in specie.

This, as you may imagine, further damaged the Mexican economy, because there was less money in it, because it wasn’t worth what it was said to be worth, in practical terms.

Specie isn’t magic. People didn’t want the £ because it was a pound of .90 silver, they wanted it because the British economy was stable. Nothing to do with the Gold/Silver reserves.

And your idea the economy is able to be larger than the gold reserves… How do you do that. If you have a billion dollars in currency (that is, equal to a 1bn valuation of the gold in reserve), how does that money move about? If you have a 10bn economy how do the bills get paid? There is 90 percent of your stuff being bought/paid for with what?

What happens if people claim their money in gold?

That’s one of Ron Paul’s big things… he says that FDR, ‘Defaulted” on the US when his administration stopped redeeming dollars for gold. What happens if you have more need for means of transfer than you have means to transfer?

Money isn’t a “thing” it’s an idea. It says that, in exchange for this abstraction, I’ll give you a thing. We agree that this abstraction is worth the thing. Inflation is a change in what the accepted value of the abstraction is. It can’t be avoided.

But all money is fiat. There was no reason for an oz of gold to be worth 20USD. The Gov’t just said it was. Which is valuation by fiat.

Pecunium
9 years ago

random 6×7: But, until electronics, gold was useless outside of the “oooh, shiny” factor. Its worth, like diamonds, is largely because people associate it with wealth. You can’t make anything except for decorations (and electronic components, I guess?) out of it, you can’t eat it, it won’t keep you warm.

It makes superb pans, esp. skillets.

But it’s damned expensive. Only ever been done as an experiment to see how well it worked. The people who can afford it (if they knew about it; it takes a serious fan of both cooking, and physics to find even references to the paper) don’t care enough about cooking to spend that kind of money to make the lives of the people who cook for them that much more fun.

The people who would like it, can’t afford it (imagine an 10″ skillet, say by Mauviel, made not in copper, but of an 18kt gold… the cost would be… prohibitive).

kirbywarp
kirbywarp
9 years ago

The same thing that Pecunium was talking about happens with banks as well. If a bunch of people want to withdraw money from their account, the banks may not have enough physical currency to perform all those withdrawals.

If money were more physical, would this problem go away? Nope. Not only to banks lend out money, depleting their store beyond what people put in, but they spend the money via investments which may not pay back immediately. No matter what form the money takes, you get this problem of having less money in the bank then people put in.

Pecunium
9 years ago

Kirby: “Fractional Reserve Banking”. One of the reforms the big banks were opposed to was increasing the percentage of actual cash in reserve, as opposed to assets on the books they were required to keep.

The problem, of course, was with the repeal of Glass-Steagal, the nature of the assets became much more volatile than simple mortgages. Making “securitised mortgages” illegal might help with that, since the banks were unwilling to actually scrutinise the paper they were buying, and then engaged in fraudulent practises to deal with the problems their greed created.

Lauralot
Lauralot
9 years ago

Hey Brandon, I know you’re really excited that there’s gold in them thar hills and all, but you still haven’t told us what the abused lady with no car or money and a tiny screaming child should do yet.

hellkell
hellkell
9 years ago

Lauralot, you silly goose, she should still leave. She could just sit in the street crying along with tiny child, and people will give her things!

Pecunium
9 years ago

Lauralot: The general consensus of the, “get out” school of thought is that she needs to leave, or accept the consequences.

Attempting to defend herself, if he’s not actively trying to kill her, at that moment, would be wrong and immoral.

Kave
Kave
9 years ago

Brandon

Did you read the internet novel now available in full length:sensation with conspiracy theorists : “Light’s Out!”? I’m guessing if you’ve read anything in the past decade that would be it.

I cannot recommend that sane people with over a sixth grade level of reading comprehension read it, but it seems it’s a cult book amongst those that believe what Brandon believes. Maybe he never bothered to read the book and just gets tips from others who have? Either way I read it, meaning Light’s out!.

I have to say that I really got a lot out of The Fountainhead when I was 15. I had told my parents I didn’t want to go to university, my dad gave it to me and said “if you can get through this and justify your reasons we’ll talk.”. For anyone that has read that book (actually) you could imagine the discussions that would go on (or did in my case and should) after a 15 year old has read it.

After reading it I was on top of the world so to speak, after talking/arguing with my dad I realized I was just a peg.

But you Brandon you’ve read it or not are highly influenced by “Light’s Out!”. Golf cart batteries, the women not being able to handle not having a shower, the supermarket employees showing up for work, everything just falling into place for the “moral man”.

The reality is Brandon if things hit the fan you’re sitting on your computer all day, you are going to be dead. It’s not a bad thing, I live right downtown on a high floor and if it was the end of the world frankly I’d want to be amongst the first to die not the last.

get over it little man. Life always ends in death.

1 4 5 6