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Dilbert + Scott Adams’ Insufferable Mansplainations = MRA Dilbert. Perfect!

Note: Scott Adams actually believes this

The We Hunted the Mammoth Pledge Drive is on! If you haven’t already, support this blog by donating through the PayPal button below. Thanks!

Today’s amazing thing on the Internet: MRA Dilbert, a new Tumblr blog that mixes the art of Scott Adams’ Dilbert comic strips with Adams’ ludicrous, insufferable, and actually completely serious opinions on such subjects as women, women, and women.

It’s pretty awesome. I’m just jealous that I did’t think of it first.

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nparker
nparker
4 years ago

@ kupo

Walter’s definitely a troll, but their tactics are quite weird. Almost reasonable stuff mixed with ignorant nonsense, and then moving on to talking about his personal penis fetish.

Yeah, I agree he’s trying to trick us into saying weird stuff, but we’re not biting.

People who aren’t very intelligent seem to think everyone is as ignorant as them, so anything based on this assumption doesn’t actually work.

lkeke35
lkeke35
4 years ago

EJ:
Oh, just Google the term “Misogynoir”, Feminism is for White Women, and Womanism.

Feminism as practiced by white women often doesn’t take into account that misogyny impacts WoC differently and takes different forms (like that slutwalk thing which, for black women, is linked to race respectability, for example.) Also this particular form of feminism doesn’t take poverty into account and is often practiced by white women of certain social and economic classes.

Womanism is a form of feminism specifically created to address issues that are a priority in communities of color along with trans -issues ,as well. In Womanism specific issues of misogyny practiced by MoC towards WoC are addressed.

Misogynoir is a special term created solely to express that specific intersection of race and misogyny towards brown skinned women.

http://www.gradientlair.com/post/60973580823/general-misogyny-versus-misogynoir
http://feministculture.com/index.php/2015/08/19/anti-black-misogyny/

http://everydayfeminism.com/

I’ve found the site Everyday Feminism to be very helpful with definitions and clearly stating issues of different forms of feminism. This site also practices intersectionality on issues that affect all types of women and is a safe space with no comment section.

RoscoeTCat
RoscoeTCat
4 years ago

@Lkeke35:

RE: Slutwalks – I remember a Slutwalk, years ago, ( I don’t remember the city) where a black woman requested that white women refrain from participating, in order to show solidarity with black women. I don’t recall her exact words, but the gist was that black women weren’t in any position to make light of the possibility of sexual assault.

Sad, sad.

kupo
kupo
4 years ago

@Teepee
I’m referring to when we discuss issues, such as feminist issues or even the narrative around our culture. For example, how often is the 75-80% of a man’s wage stat thrown around? That stat ignores people of color as if they don’t exist. What about the 54% of a white man’s wage that a Latina woman makes? What about black men, who make less than white women? I almost always see something along the lines of “women make 78% of men’s salaries” which erases POC entirely from the picture and speaks only of the dynamic between white men and white women. http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0882775.html

It happens because the majority of white people are unaware of the different struggles that POC face. I grew up in the 80s/90s and was taught that racism was something that happened back in the 50s and that everyone had a fair chance at success now. Now I know that’s a load of crock, but I had to seek out that knowledge *and* be open to it and open to recognizing my own racism. The majority don’t even do that much.

BTW, I would like to second the thanks to @Lkeke35 for sharing your perspective on here. It helps me learn. 🙂

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

Speaking of terminology, does anyone else remember “Women’s Lib(eration)”?

Was that just a UK thing?

TeeRee
TeeRee
4 years ago

So Kupo, you are speaking specifically of the US. US does not equal world. Also in your link notice that women of every racial group make less than men of their same racial group. If you were to aggregate the whole thing based only on gender you’d probably still see something close to women at 70-80% of men. It’s not accurate to say Hispanic women are “ignored” in discussions because they make less than 78% of what white men make. Can’t tell from the data you supplied but I’m betting you’ll find that Hispanic women make about 70-80% of what Hispanic men make. Oh now I’m curious, let me see if I can find the actual population numbers sourced in your link…

And it is TeeREE, not TeePEE, thank you very much.

History Nerd
History Nerd
4 years ago

I believe some people in the US called themselves “women’s libbers” but switched to “feminists” at least by the 70’s.

Scildfreja
Scildfreja
4 years ago

I’d like to give the Person of the Thread Award to Lkeke35, too. Your comments have really brought to the fore some worries that have been itching in the back of my head for a while now and made them crystal-clear. And new reading material for me, too! You are a treasure. Thank you.

kupo
kupo
4 years ago

@TeeRee
Apologies for not catching the autocorrect earlier.

I am referring to the US, which Walter also appears to be referring to. It’s pretty obvious that the majority of white people in the US are oblivious to the struggles of POC. That’s hardly controversial on an intersectional feminist blog. The 78% stat is specifically about white women as compared to white men and it’s used a lot of the time. I’m not sure why you’re so upset that I point that out.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

@ History Nerd

Yeah, it was mainly a 70s thing here too. I quite like the term as it highlights that women are coming from a place of inequality; not that there’s anything wrong with ‘feminism’ of course. I’m probably just nostalgic about anything with ‘liberation’ in the title; it has a nice activist/”viva la revolution!” vibe about it.

Skull
Skull
4 years ago

Keep paying attention to the Holtzclaw case, ya’ll. He hasn’t been sentenced yet – that’s on January 21st, I think. The sentence talked about is just the jury recommendation, not the official sentence.

TeeRee
TeeRee
4 years ago

Also Kupo, there’s not a lot of data out there to account for type of work in determining gender/race wage gap. The average engineer of any race/gender combination makes a lot more than the average social worker or teacher of any race/gender combination. The average doctor makes a lot more than the average nurse. The average hotel assistant manager makes a lot more than the average hotel room cleaner. See where I’m going with this? Sure there are huge issues with equal access to the higher-paying professions and those issues are not the same for white women vs women of color vs men of color, but in direct comparisons across single professions how does it stack up? I used to work as an engineer for a large oil company and got to participate in hiring of new and experienced engineers as part of my job. There was a strict set formula for starting salaries for new hires out of college, based on specific degree (chemical vs petroleum vs mechanical vs civil engineering), degree attained (BS vs MS vs PhD), and number of months of work experience via internships. There was ZERO difference in starting salary due to race or gender. My husband and I hired on to the same company at the same time and he had a significantly higher starting salary because of his major. Interestingly, over the years I slowly caught up to him and actually ended up making more than he did right before I resigned. I don’t pretend that my experience was exactly the same as all other white women in the company, of course. That company was and remains largely composed of white men, with a fair amount of entrenched racism and sexism, but the culture is slowly becoming more inclusive. It is more challenging for a black female engineer to become an engineering manager (though MRAs will have you believe otherwise), but once she gets there she’s making just as much money as her white male counterparts. I believe the more important discussion is not the statistics you quoted, but how to go about improving access for women and POC to higher-paying professions and then to management positions within those professions. I don’t think the solutions are the same for white women vs women of color vs men of color, but I don’t think it’s very meaningful to look only at the table you quoted.

And no, if you look at the other tables just on gender they are NOT just white, they are ALL workers.

weirwoodtreehugger
weirwoodtreehugger
4 years ago

Almost half of black woman and Latina scientists have been mistaken for janitors or admin staff
http://www.zmescience.com/science/news-science/sexism-racism-stem-0423432/

So yeah, there are specific kinds of misogyny faced by women of color.

Also, people with names that are perceived as black are far less likely to get a callback despite any company policy against racial discrimination.
http://www.nber.org/digest/sep03/w9873.html

TeeRee
TeeRee
4 years ago

Yes WWTH, that’s exactly the kind of thing I’m talking about. Women of any color experience common things such as being more likely to be asked to make copies or get coffee while men lead the meetings, and POC tend to experience discrimination and challenges that white people do not. Still within each racial group women tend to have less access than men to higher paying positions.

Alan Robertshaw
Alan Robertshaw
4 years ago

On the subject of assumptions in business. I’ve just this minute received some draft board minutes from the other side in a commercial deal (essentially they’ve done the paperwork for us to agree to their proposal). The entire document is written with male pronouns (and it doesn’t even have the standard ‘male includes female’ boilerplate).

As it happens our MD who will also be the chair(man) of the meeting is a woman* so I guess we’re stymied.

[* That’s less to do with any smashing of gender stereotypes and more that she’s the only one of us who’s vaguely good at this sort of thing]

kupo
kupo
4 years ago

There was ZERO difference in starting salary due to race or gender.

That specifically is not what the pay gap is about. That’s closer to 3% difference. The pay gap is a tool for looking at systemic issues, not discrimination against individuals. There are a number of reasons behind the pay gap, such as devaluation of work that is typically done by minorities and women, hiring bias, and huge problems with the US education system, including lower funding for “urban” schools. People of color and minorities being paid less for the same job is only part of the picture.

lkeke35
lkeke35
4 years ago

Scildfreja/RoscoeTCat: Thank you.
I wasn’t trying to start a teaching moment. (LOL) I don’t think of myself as a teacher, because I’m still learning about this stuff too.( I only just heard the term misogynoir, earlier this year.)
I’m still trying to get a global picture of women’s oppression and how these anti-feminine thoughts and ideas manifest themselves in different cultures.

I do wonder if there are Asian and Indian versions of the MRA. (See, now I’ve got something to Google, too.)

Scented Fucking Hard Chairs
Scented Fucking Hard Chairs
4 years ago

@lkeke

There is Masculinist India, a close friend of AVFM’s that somehow manages to be even more violent.

(Echoing the “You’re awesome and I love learning from your posts” sentiments, by the way!)

TeeRee
TeeRee
4 years ago

Kupo, this table is a much better illustrator of the pay gap:

http://www.infoplease.com/us/census/median-earnings-by-race.html

Look at the bolded “all women” and “all men” averages at the bottom. Average women’s salary was 78.2% of average men’s salary. Because math. When you ask the question “what is the pay gap between men and women” the answer, at least in 2013, is “women on average make 78% of what men do”. Anyone looking at that same table will also see that people of color average less than whites. So, please stop trying to school me on what the pay gap means until you have a better understanding of what the data is saying.

Viscaria
Viscaria
4 years ago

In the 70s in Canada, my mom called herself a feminist. People inclined to dismiss her feminism as the passing hobby of a bored young woman said she was “into women’s lib.”

Scented Fucking Hard Chairs
Scented Fucking Hard Chairs
4 years ago

(… What are Kupo and TeeRee supposed to be arguing about? I might’ve missed something – lack of paragraph breaks plus my nonexistent vision, hooray – but it seems to me that they agree?…)

Scildfreja
Scildfreja
4 years ago

I wasn’t trying to start a teaching moment. (LOL) I don’t think of myself as a teacher, because I’m still learning about this stuff too.( I only just heard the term misogynoir, earlier this year.)

The best teachers are the unintentional ones.

And misogynoir makes me think of a really, really sexist Dick Tracy. Like, more than the usual one. It’s a great word!

TeeRee
TeeRee
4 years ago

Kupo said that white people ignore the problems of POC, then used the often quoted “78%” pay gap number and claimed it was ONLY white women vs white men when in fact it is ALL women vs ALL men and also coincidentally white women vs white men. As if most white people have no idea that there is a racial pay gap as well as a gender one.

nparker
nparker
4 years ago

@ Scented Fucking Hard Chairs

I was thinking the exact same thought.

Kupo and TeeRee, what is the argument, may I ask, because it doesn’t seem clear.

Walter
Walter
4 years ago

Lkeke35

Fair enough. I’m sorry for misunderstanding you.

In terms of black MRAs, the only one I’m really familiar with is Tommy Sotomayor, and you’re right his rhetoric is very different from your standard MRA. He seems to be an extreme version of a misogynistic idea that I’ve heard a lot from some black men. The idea that black people need to “control our women.” Like if only we could control our women like the whites/Asians/Latinos control theirs, the ills of the black community would disappear. It’s a horrible idea, but one that has a lot of traction among some black men.

TeeRee

You don’t need to be a mind reader to see that white people aren’t concerned about non-white ethnic groups. White people don’t even want to see non-white people in movies, unless that PoC is acting like a stereotype or helping white people in some way. They aren’t concerned with the real life struggles of PoC.

TeeRee
TeeRee
4 years ago

Walter, you’re very very wrong when you say that white people aren’t concerned about non-white groups. White racists, especially MRA white racists, are OVERLY concerned about non-whites in a bad way. Some actively work to make things worse for non-whites, and some just complain on the Internet a lot, but many have somehow convinced themselves that whites are getting shafted more than any other group. White non-racists exist across a broad spectrum from actively working to specifically improve US society to be fair and equitable for non-whites all the way down to just living their daily lives treating all people fairly. If you said 90% of ALL people are mostly concerned about their own daily lives and their own personal problems instead of with other people’s problems, that’s probably closer to the truth. To make blanket statements about what 90% of whites think is just stupid.

kupo
kupo
4 years ago

@TeeRee
All I was trying to say was that white people are often unaware of the problems that people of color face and that they often bring a white perspective to the conversation and frame if as a perspective for everyone. I apparently used a poor example of that, which was my mistake. I wasn’t trying to school you on anything; the numbers I see thrown around are often point back to the numbers specifically between white men and white women. That’s all.

@Walter
STFU.

TeeRee
TeeRee
4 years ago

@Kupo, I’m just trying to say that there is no single “white perspective” just as there’s no single “black perspective” or “Asian perspective” or whatever. Likewise there’s no single “female perspective” or “American perspective”. Lots of people are uninterested in anything beyond their own specific experience, I don’t think that’s a uniquely white issue.

kupo
kupo
4 years ago

@TeeRee
Where did I say there was? I’m really confused about what you’re upset with me for. I didn’t say all white people are unaware of racial issues. I simply said that the majority of white people ignore others’ perspectives when they talk abut issues. I include myself in that, even though I put an effort into understand what people of color go through because I know that I am ignorant of some of the issues they face. The slutwalk mentioned above is a great example of that–I never knew about the issues around it, especially for POC, until I read this thread.

Also, and I hope I’m not going to upset you further here, but I don’t believe it’s fair to say that’s true of everyone, even if it’s generally true that people tend to mostly care about themselves. The vast majority of our media is designed with a white and/or male audience in mind, so non-white people are surrounded by white people’s perspectives while white people rarely see the perspectives of any people of color.

Walter
Walter
4 years ago

TeeRee

I’m confused as to what we’re arguing. I agree with most of what you wrote and don’t think it really goes against what I wrote.

TeeRee
TeeRee
4 years ago

@Kupo, Definitely a fair point that the US media and entertainment industries are white-male-centric and non-whites have far more exposure to that than the other way around. For every “Blackish” or “Girlfriends” or “Cristela” or “Empire” there are a hundred “Last Man Standing” or “Friends”, and surely there are some whites who will think that “Empire” is representative of “black culture” even though they know “Friends” is just silly Hollywood formula. So I would agree with you that in the US, a larger percentage of non-whites are aware of issues facing whites and a smaller percentage of whites are aware that POC face different and unique issues than whites. But these days it would take special effort for non-racist whites NOT to see at least the larger issues facing POC even if they have little experience of those things in their daily lives.

kupo
kupo
4 years ago

@TeeRee
Agreed.

Lkeke35
Lkeke35
4 years ago

Walter: I’m aware of Sotomayor. I first heard of him when another poster I knew criticized his views. In fact that’s been most of my exposure to him. I haven’t actually watched his videos but in the black online community there’s a significant amount of criticism of him and black men who think like him.

In our community it seems to manifest as a kind of extreme form of respectability politics. That some black women have stopped being worthy of respect because of the way they dress and behave. That they’re not modest enough. That sounds a bit like slut shaming but there’s a subtle difference in that the emphasis is more on how they can’t respect certain types of women and how black women are somehow uniquely theirs, and their behavior needs to be controlled.

It’s hard to state the exact difference because it’s much more subtle than simply calling women names because they can’t get sex from them. Although there is a certain contingent of black men who make a lot of MRA type statements about gold digging and child support.

Funnily enough, in our community, these men are considered fairly shiftless by most of us and looked down upon because their philosophies and solutions do not take into account how racism affects black women. (For the record, a lot of their solutions seem to consist of “put on some more clothes, stop getting hair weaves, behave yourself and stop disrespecting black men by not needing them”.)

So yeah, there’s a lot of sexism and misogyny but it’s mostly individualistic and unorganized. There aren’t a whole lot of MoC joining Elam’s group because of its racism, and it’s open misogyny against black women, by black men is definitely frowned on.

Bryce
Bryce
4 years ago

@Lkeke35

It seems like many black women have a lot of disparaging things to say about “their men” as well.

Lkeke35
Lkeke35
4 years ago
Reply to  Bryce

That’s a whole other topic, that’s completely separate from this one. I’m not stepping in that fight.

Argenti Aertheri
Argenti Aertheri
4 years ago

Semi off topic — David, can we get an IP check on Walter? I know we’ve been speculating he’s a return visitor, but I don’t think anyone has actually asked you to check, so could you please?

Kat
Kat
4 years ago

@History Nerd

I believe some people in the US called themselves “women’s libbers” but switched to “feminists” at least by the 70’s.

The second wave of feminism (the one after the wave of feminism that won women the right to vote) began in the late 1960s, but wasn’t much discussed in the national media. It became much more well known after Ms. magazine was launched in late 1971.

Feminists never called themselves “women’s libbers.” That was the (oh, so witty) opposition.

Walter
Walter
4 years ago

Lkeke35

That’s what I was getting at. The “control our women” comment seems to come from this idea that women are property and need to be controlled, which is very much in-line with MRA thinking, but like you wrote it’s mixed in with respectability politics and other black-specific issues as well.

Something I would like to add is that people who tend to think this way also Believe that black women should sacrifice so that black men can become successful and raise up black women with them. It’s an odd idea, but one I’ve heard since I was a kid.

Where I disagre with you is the idea that it’s individualstic. I’ve heard the “control our women” statement too often to think that people are coming up with that on their own. There is a definite set of ideas that get spread around, they’re just disorganized.

Lkeke35
Lkeke35
4 years ago

Thought this was an excellent takedown of the issues surrounding Holtzclaw and his victims, and why intersectional feminism is so important. This tags well with some of the things I was saying earlier about the narratives surrounding the rape of black women.

http://www.theshoopsroost.com/2015/12/15/the-holtzclaw-trial-its-intersectional-feminism-or-bust/

Warning: This is a post discussing rape and violence against women.

mockingbird
mockingbird
4 years ago

@Ikeke – I’ll throw in another “thanks for the education”.

This stuff falls into the “religion and politics” hole – things that most people don’t usually discuss IRL (outside of a classroom) because they’re afraid of looking ignorant or alienating whoever they’re talking with.

Nothing to contribute on my end, just “thanks”.

mockingbird
mockingbird
4 years ago

Hey, I have a couple of questions for you, Lkeke (and they’re meant totally honestly, not as “gotchas” – I always feel the need to clarify if there might be some ambiguity online):

If a white feminist asks about these issues, is it intrusive or welcome (fully realizing that the answer might be “both” or “it depends”)?

Can white people do anything but listen and be supportive?
It seems like the answer for in-group stuff would be “no”, though the answer for out-group stuff would be more situational.

Sometimes it seems like there’s a very fine line (or a shifting, amorphous line) between being an ally who’s effectively leveraging recognized privilege (like, say, David does as a feminist male blogger chronicling the mansophere) and being a know-nothing wanna-be savior crashing though the scene and being an asshole.

lkeke35
lkeke35
4 years ago
Reply to  mockingbird

Mockingbird: I’m sorry but I got nothing on that. I can only tell you how I feel about ally-ship, which is an entirely individual response, and not reflective of how any other black women feel about it. I know that I appreciate people just being knowledgeable and aware, which means my bar is set pretty low. Other black women feel there’s nothing allies can do but be supportive and some think they should speak up more. I feel what someone decides to do with their awareness is entirely on them.

If you’re looking for advice on what you can do all I can say is, learn as much as you possibly can before approaching the topic, and then do what your heart moves you to do. If someone you’re trying to support says stop, then stop.

Speaking of this topic, I found this to be hilarious:

https://youtu.be/N-p8dOqf3P4

And please check out all the other MTV Decoded videos. They’re all pretty good and manage to explain racial stuff without being insulting or offensive.

mockingbird
mockingbird
4 years ago

Thanks for your advice.

I realize that I put you on the spot (“WHAT SHOULD I DOOOOO?”), and that’s pretty unfair.

Will check on the link in a bit, current situation’s not conducive to playing video 😀

Frank Torpedo
4 years ago

@Bryce

It seems like many black women have a lot of disparaging things to say about “their men” as well.

No, they do not. This is not a thing.

How did you come to this conclusion?

Speaking as a 25-year-old cisgender, bisexual black man, black women are usually the first to protect and defend us, and to speak out about the injustices we face.

It sounds more like you have been led astray by the hilarious – and I use the term hilarious with the heaviest of sarcasm – stereotypical character of the ‘strong black woman who don’t need no man’, who also is not a thing, and does not exist.

There are some black women who are angry at black men, but I feel they have a reason to do so because a number of black men behave like self-destructive morons. These black women are not being irrational or aggressive or angry, because there are black men who engage in extraordinarily stupid behavior.

I have personally experienced being treated like shit by other black men, and I assume that if it happens to me, it very likely happens to other black women, who then, perhaps, complain in a public setting about these black men.

Yes, there are black men who do bad things. No, this does not mean anything, and is no reflection on my race. For example, you will hear white women complaining about white men who treated them badly, but nobody assumes that they are passing unilateral judgment on all white men, everywhere.

One should treat the complaints black women have about CERTAIN black men similarly. They’re speaking about the time(s) they have encountered a shitty black male. It happens. We’re human beings and are prone to embarking on shitty life decisions, or falling prey to negative external feedback like everyone else. It does not mean that ‘black women hate black men’.

Frank Torpedo
4 years ago

One more thing, Bryce, and you may want to bend your ear, or rather, your eyeballs, towards my point, because these points I am about to explain are actually Things.

Not only are there tons of black female/black male cis-het couples who live happily together, in idyllic lives with children, a house, and so on, must I remind you of the majority that usually appears in the protests and demonstrations following the inhumane slaying of a black male by law enforcement?

It sure as hell isn’t white or Asian women, I’ll clue you in on that much. And – regrettably – it usually isn’t black men.

No, the crowd usually contains a large percentage of black women. Wives, mothers, daughters, and sisters of black men, who, rightfully, believe that their men are in danger. All the other groups pale in comparison to them.

Scented Fucking Hard Chairs
Scented Fucking Hard Chairs
4 years ago

I love watching a good takedown of Bryce.

Bryce
Bryce
4 years ago

@Frank, I don’t live in the US and got that idea from some bitter statements of African American men online, that particular stereotype, the often-cited “70% born to single mothers” statistic along with shows where black men were being coldly dismissed as undateable by women in some sort of group discussion situation (most recently on the Nightly show with Larry Wilmore). Your life experience obviously trumps anything I have to say on this.

Lkeke35
Lkeke35
4 years ago

Yes!
Thank you very much, Frank.😆

I didn’t have anything to say about that topic because I don’t know Bryce. I also don’t know many women like that either, but Ive seen domestic violence (and shitty behavior) towards my close friends and my little sisters. I love the black men I know, though. I’m not special. I just got lucky. That’s all to it.

I have cousins, little brothers, and nephews and the men in my life have always been honorable to me, so I don’t actually have any beef with them. But I have met black women who have been hurt and usually when they talk like that, what they’re talking about is feelings of betrayal (from the men we’ve always thrown our support behind and expected to love and protect us), and it’s never all black men, (usually they’re just talking about their dating pool, which is the kind of complaints you hear from women everywhere.)

I think sometimes what you’re talking about too is that crabs in a barrel mentality as well. There are certain black men who see black women doing well (not doing well is really not an option, since so many black men get taken out of the life game too damn early) and feeling emasculated, they wish to tear her down, make unreasonable demands or take advantage. I guess, in that sense, some of these “bitter” black men are just like MRAs, yeah.

I also think because the attitudes of a Tommy Sotomayor are well recognized for what they are by other black people, that there is no MRA level of organization among them. (Unless you count Hoteps, which is whole other kettle of fish and not to be talked about in this space.)

I don’t want to hash out black pathologies here, but I thank you for what you said.

Frank Torpedo
4 years ago

Bryce, the problem is that you’re listening to a very small minority of stupid black men and stupid black women. Moreover, I don’t see why you’ve assumed that they speak for all black people everywhere.

Don’t do that. Or do, if you want to, but bear in mind that they are probably wrong. About a lot of things.

And those black women on those shows? They probably would have said black men were made of a mixture of cheese and cucumbers, if they were paid enough.

I’m pretty sure that those black women and men you mentioned probably were not degree-wielding Professors of African-American culture, and, thus, armed with the statistics and information necessary to formulate a decisive, academic, peer-reviewed public opinion about black men.

I hardly think – and I’m not dismissing these black women out of hand, far from it – that you should consider them a Final Authority on the subject. I mean, I seriously doubt they even assembled a control group or a laboratory to test their theories out.

Basically, it sounds like you’ve heard and seen a few bitter black people, and decided to apply that to the world of black people at large.

Frank Torpedo
4 years ago

@Lkeke35

You’re welcome. I’m sorry, but I couldn’t let that bullshit slide by me. Bryce was saying something that just flat out does not make sense at all, and I felt it necessary to point out that he is talking about a thing that isn’t even a thing.

You know how people talk about ‘straw feminists’ who hate men and have all kinds of fake arguments about men? Similarly, Bryce is propping up some ‘straw black women’ who hate black men, and vice-versa.

He isn’t even being original, because the trope of the Man-Hating Black Woman and the Woman-hating Black Man is so deeply ingrained in the consciousness of the world that there are actually black men and women who act out these stereotypes, a la Tommy Sotomayor.

I come down extra hard on black men and women who profess to believe in these tropes, as well. It really irks me that there are black people – who should be more knowledgeable and too well-informed to fall prey to this rampant bullshit – who think that black men hate black women, or vice-versa.

(Unless you count Hoteps, which is whole other kettle of fish and not to be talked about in this space.)

Yow!

Now that you’ve mentioned the H-word, it’s too late, comrade! The Portal to Hotepdom has opened! The Ankhs Cometh!

Because people are going to google the term, and then they’re going to find out about Hoteps, and we’re inevitably going to have to talk about them! Nooooooo!

…I may have, accidentally, mentioned Hoteps here:

https://wehuntedthemammoth.com/2015/12/11/mgtow-wonders-why-do-women-see-us-as-breeding-stock-for-making-babies-based-on-racial-traits/comment-page-2/#comment-586394

But I was mainly talking about Homophobia and Transphobia in the black community, which is, in my opinion, as much of A Problem as Misogynoir. It is also like Misogynoir, as it deals with a distinct intersection of race and homophobia/transphobia.