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MRA: The National Rifle Association needs to stop talking about video games and fight the real enemy: feminists.

Video Games: Super Serious Man Business

Video Games: Super Serious Man Business

Our old friend over at the Pro-Male/Anti-Feminist Technology blog is angry again. This time he’s mad at a legitimate target: National Rifle Association president Wayne LaPierre. But not because LaPierre is the head of an organization that has stood athwart every attempt at sensible gun control, making tragedies like the one in Newtown an all-too-predictable side effect of the easy availability of semiautomatic weaponry.

No, Mr. Pro-Male/Anti-Feminist Tech is made at LaPierre because he thinks the NRA big gun has turned into a feminist. No, really. Noting that in the wake of the Newtown shootings LaPierre launched a transparently opportunistic attack on violent video games, Mr. PMAFT accuses him of doing the work of the grand feminist conspiracy against men and manhood:

The most important reason why LaPierre is wrong is because what he is doing is feminist.  Video games are an activity predominately enjoyed by men.  So are guns.  Both activities are under attack from feminists (just like other predominately male activities like science fiction are) because men are interested in them and women are mostly not interested in them.  LaPierre is shooting himself in the foot (pun intended) by alienating allies among the video game community and helping out feminists in their war on male activities.

Never mind that nearly half – 47% — of those playing video games these days are girls and women, according to the Entertainment Software Association. (I await the inevitable comment from a troll telling us all that whatever games these women are playing just don’t count because blah and blah.)

What LaPierre should have done is form an alliance with the video game community.  While the Newtown shootings are being used against gun owners right now, the next target will be video games and other mostly male interests and activities.  Both the video game community and the gun community are fighting the same enemy, feminism.  They should be working together to point out facts like how the Newtown shooter was raised by a single mother and how homes where the father is kicked out lead to more violence.

Never mind that the shooter — like virtually all mass shooters — was a dude; a woman is always to blame.

The NRA is in a position of weakness now because they are attacking video games and not the real causes of the Newtown tragedy, single motherhood and feminism.  The NRA is in the same boat as the Republican Party where it needs to become an explicitly anti-feminist and pro-mens rights organization to survive.   (Lots of conservative and right wing organizations are in this situation.)  Guns aren’t the problem here, but neither are video games.  The NRA needs to realize this and realize that its only way forward is by fighting feminism.  Anything else leads the NRA to irrelevance.

So one of the most powerful lobbies in American politics needs to team up with a Men’s Rights “movement” that can’t organize a single event that draws a crowd bigger than 8 people, or else it will fade into irrelevance?

I dearly hope the NRA fades into obscurity, and I am hopeful that public opinion about guns is beginning finally to shift in the right direction, but I’m not sure the NRA needs any pointers from MRAs on political relevance.

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Posted on January 7, 2013, in a woman is always to blame, all about the menz, antifeminism, men who should not ever be with women ever, misogyny, MRA, no girls allowed, playing the victim and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 806 Comments.

  1. Wasn’t that Peter Andrew Nolan (c) though? I though NWO just really sounded like them but didn’t go full fledge “the courtroom is a ship” about things?

    NWO was the one who first brought fringed flags to my attention. That and CAPITAL LETTERS creating a binding contract. Man, that was a fun night.

  2. (Speaking of cons, were you a GoH at Arisia last year? I wish I’d been on this blog back then – I’d have asked you to sign a printout of the Book Of Larnin’, or something)

    I did Arisia the year before last. It was super fun. That con is the best.

  3. I think the breadth of fantasy that female children are supposed to like has been shortened. What is with the male my little pony interest, where I have seen some images (?Etsy) where I wish I could wash my eyeballs afterwards.

  4. @Kiwi, my son informs me they are called “Bronies” >.<

  5. Do yourselves a favor. Go to that Search box up near the top right, enter bronies, and click Go.

  6. Sir Bodsworth Rugglesby III

    Oh, yes, I remember the MRA bronies.

  7. Wait, are there actually bronies who argue that MLP is not intended for young girls?

  8. Sir Bodsworth Rugglesby III

    Follow Cloudiah’s advice. No paraphrasing could be more facepalm-eriffic than their own words.

  9. “Presumably we don’t read anything except Mills and Boon or Fifty Shades of Sludge.”

    Or that hideous thing with the sparkly emotionally abusive vampires : P

  10. Omg, MRA bronies, I had……I had no idea….

  11. “When the next real crisis upsets them (men), our so-called rights will vanish like — like that smoke. … And whatever has gone wrong will be blamed on our freedom, like the fall of Rome was. You’ll see.”

    Alice Sheldon/James Tiptree Jr. — “The Women Men Don’t See,”

  12. Shaennon: I assume from the way you phrased it you will not be present this year either?

    :<

    And, before I turn in…

    I'm on the lookout for

    You won't see them coming.

  13. LOL anything said in French automatically sounds better.

    Back on the bronies topic, do MRA bronies fart rainbows?

    And on the OT, I love video games, I have been playing them since I got a C64 in 1983, I played World of Warcraft for 5 years, and I’m currently enjoying Guild Wars 2. I like computer RPGs since Balder’s Gate. I prefer to play female characters, and the RPGs I have played have allowed one to pick one’s sex in the game. Except for the Witcher, but I believe that is based on a series of novels where the protagonist is male.

    The most fun I have had playing online is where I have played with family groups. I don’t know why there is this focus on the 15-24 male demographic which I wouldn’t have thought would be where most of the game dollars are. My impression of the apps market for smartphones and tablets is that (setting aside the productivity apps) there’s a big market for things that appeal to a wide range of age groups. While you can’t really play a FPS on a phone, it isn’t a great experience playing an RPG either, so the change in media format isn’t an explanation.

  14. The Kittehs' Unpaid Help

    Les Chats Ninjas!

    ::dies::

    ::dies again::

  15. MLP has been aiming to appeal to their Bronie fan base.

    They know who watches the show and have no problem catering to them.

    However, I believe they were surprised to find their fan base had so many men.

  16. thenatfantastic

    Uhm. Did anyone see Underpants-troll say this to me on P3 (using a slightly different name so modded as first-time poster)

    Hi thenatfantastic

    I agree with you. When I was not born, I was thinking that the world is a very bad place, and then oups I was born.

    *tips head* So… any ideas? All I have said on this thread is “wut” when Dingus The Dim claimed to be a high-school teacher.

  17. The Kittehs' Unpaid Help

    To quote Hamish MacBeth, bafflin’.

  18. thenatfantastic

    He’s done it on the Pierre thread too. Joy.

  19. starterlifesydney

    Peter Andrew Nolan’s latest info can be found here…

    http://peternolanstalker.blogspot.com.au/?m=1

    I have lately been reading 3 blogs of MRAS who have liberated themselves from the spearhead because they consider it too consertative… Scary times ahead…

  20. thenatfantastic

    Nah, it’s just another split. Pretty soon the MRM will be comprised of lots of individual angry dudes who aren’t speaking to each other.

  21. How could MRA Bronies possibly exist? It blows my mind.

    And is it my imagination or is the MRM becoming even wackier….

  22. @katz

    Narrative is the story and all the elements that make up the story (characters, setting, plot, props so to speak, etc.) This is to seperate the narrative elements from the ludological.

    Sorry it took me so long to respond. I had a panic attacks that took up all of yesterday evening.

  23. *a panic attack, just the one was enough thanks.

  24. I don’t like the concept of “bronies.” We have enough media. For god’s sake, we should let the girls have something! And then let them have more! Until there’s plenty of girl-oriented media that isn’t solely about how they can make themselves attractive for boys!

  25. @Some Gal: Sorry to hear about your panic attack. All is well now, I take it. Hugs!

  26. @Falconer

    Thanks. I cuddled up and tried to distract myself with “In Plain Sight.” So far this morning has been much better.

  27. Oh! And

    We have enough media. For god’s sake, we should let the girls have something!

    MISANDRY!!!!

    Now, you feminists are trying to ruin that bastion of masculinity MLP.

  28. “I don’t like the concept of “bronies.” We have enough media. For god’s sake, we should let the girls have something! And then let them have more! Until there’s plenty of girl-oriented media that isn’t solely about how they can make themselves attractive for boys!”

    I’m the opposite. I like that boys and men are watching MLP because it breaks down the whole idea that boys are supposed to like a certain set of things and girls are supposed to like another set of things. I love that. Why should anyone be limited in what they’re allowed to like?

    That’s also why the idea of MRA bronies confuses me. Why would you be fighting gender roles for yourself while, at the same time, building them up for others. It’s complete hypocrisy.

  29. @atomicgrizzly

    It’s complete hypocrisy.

    Isn’t that their unofficial motto?

  30. “Isn’t that their unofficial motto?”

    Pretty much. Mens Rights is like a giant double-standard onion.

  31. I’m all like, yeah, bronies are great. It’s awesome that guys are watching a show aimed at younger girls.

    IF THE SHOW CATERS TO THE BRONIES, THEN IT PREVENTS THEM FROM FULLY CATERING TO THE GIRLS AND ONCE AGAIN MEN HAVE COOPTED SOMETHING GRRR SNARL RAGE.

    But I have Opinions.

  32. atomicgrizzley: Yeah, I think guys being able to watch and enjoy MLP sincerely is a huge step forward, since it’s evidence that more shows starring girls or having feminine trappings can appeal to the same broad audience as shows that are “default male”.

    That said, there is an undercurrent of the same sexism in the brony fandom which I worry about. I mean, seriously, the last thing anyone needs is a show for little girls being taken over by 30 year old dudebros wondering which pony they’d like to bang. •n•

  33. There also seems to be a lot if sexism in that media coverage of the fan phenomenon. Previously, it seems like coverage of adults interested in “kids” cartoons was just that. Adults, men and women, love Spongebob or Invader Zim or whatever. Now, there is a lot more media coverage and it almost all seems to focus on adult male fans, never adult female fans. Either far fewer adult women are interested than men or there is sexism at work (and heteronormativity since a lot of the articles seem to take a freak show approach to the men interested in a feminine thing).

    I get male fans banning together in the face of the general culture, but the exclusion of women is also a bit dicey.

  34. “IF THE SHOW CATERS TO THE BRONIES, THEN IT PREVENTS THEM FROM FULLY CATERING TO THE GIRLS AND ONCE AGAIN MEN HAVE COOPTED SOMETHING”

    That’s an interesting point. Catering to bronies kinda defeats the purpose entirely.

    “being taken over by 30 year old dudebros wondering which pony they’d like to bang.”

    That’s disturbing, but I don’t think creepy guys talking to each other about sexing up ponies ruins the show for anyone. You can always avoid those websites and watch the show as you normally would.

  35. You can always avoid those websites and watch the show as you normally would.

    I shudder to imagine being a parent and helping your child fan navigate fan sites though.

    (I agree with you on the whatever floats your boat attitude toward banging ponies, just it has got to be hard.)

  36. “I get male fans banning together in the face of the general culture, but the exclusion of women is also a bit dicey.”

    It should be “people can watch what they want,” not “men can watch what they want.”

    But also keep in mind that not all bronies are like this (not all of them talk about having sex with ponies either, that’s a common misconception that’s shared with furries).

    It’s also true about the media coverage, especially news coverage. Then again there’s a LOT I want to change about news.

  37. “I shudder to imagine being a parent and helping your child fan navigate fan sites though.”

    Those certain pictures are probably found in more specialized sites. I don’t think your average MLP fan site hosts things like that.

    http://www.equestriadaily.com/

    This one is the most popular, and there’s not a speck of pony porn to be seen anywhere.

  38. @atomicgrizzly

    Maybe my general shuddering at being a parent is making the task seem harder than it would be if I were prepared to be a parent.

  39. “Maybe my general shuddering at being a parent is making the task seem harder than it would be if I were prepared to be a parent.”

    Maybe I’m also being too dismissive. Google safesearch isn’t perfect after all. (It’s gotten a lot better though).

  40. I’m no stranger to rule 34; and I have no problem with it as long as it’s kept to the proper areas.

    It’s the takeover of those marginal spaces like YouTube comments that concerns me. (Do parental guidance software packages allow you to block all YouTube comments? If not, they damn well should these days. A more wretched hive of scum and villainy, indeed.)

  41. “I’m the opposite. I like that boys and men are watching MLP because it breaks down the whole idea that boys are supposed to like a certain set of things and girls are supposed to like another set of things. I love that. Why should anyone be limited in what they’re allowed to like?”

    Personally, I hate the gender-directing of toys and media, have since I was a kid. As a girl I would have *hated* MLP (the color pink and squeeky über-fem characters send me running from the room). But when my 12-y-o took break from his anime noir and I walked in on him watching MLP I was pretty chuffed. I couldn’t help a raised eyebrow though, and he explained about the bronies. I always felt everyone should like whatever they liked, regardless of their genital configuration.

    Personally, the MRA bronies thing confirms my suspicions that MRAs are mostly just guys who had their Inner Little Girl humiliated out of them in childhood, which made them in turn ideate women into either unattainable fantasy goddesses or crushing fascistic manipulative magical hags, rather than regular human people. And instead of just embracing their broniness and going with the text of MLP, they have to invent this whole subtext to hide behind while maintaining the MRA party line. And probably subconsciously; these guys are true believers…

  42. (Do parental guidance software packages allow you to block all YouTube comments? If not, they damn well should these days. A more wretched hive of scum and villainy, indeed.)

    YouTube itself should offer this as an option if they don’t already. (I am pretty sure that the best way tonavoid comments is to go mobile, but that shouldn’t be the only solution.)

  43. “It’s the takeover of those marginal spaces like YouTube comments that concerns me. ”

    Didn’t think of that. Fantastic point.

    “Personally, I hate the gender-directing of toys and media, have since I was a kid. As a girl I would have *hated* MLP (the color pink and squeeky über-fem characters send me running from the room).”

    Interesting. I was always the opposite, attracted to colorful and shiny things (even in regards to clothing) as a boy. It led my parents to start questioning my sexual orientation. I even recently got a nyan cat bumper sticker and had people tell me “You know that makes you look gay, right?”

    Whenever people tell me I seem gay now I just say “good.”

  44. I was lucky growing up because, for me and my sister, nothing was marked as a “boy toy” and thus off-limits. We had (still have) a huge collection of Matchbox cars and quite a few videogames for the latest Nintendo console alongside our Barbies and other dolls. I never heard any of this “Star Wars is for boys” bullshit when I confessed my Star Wars obsession (movies and toys only, no larger canon for me). Everyone always thought it was either cool or too obsessive (my mother, some friends). Even now, I love our Ninjas Turtles and Videogame action figures as much as I love my BtVS figures and no one has ever commented. (My collection of children’s books has led people to believe I have kids and some people assume all the figures/dolls are mine and not my boyfriend’s which is irritating as we basically collect together, but otherwise, my life has been remarkably free of gender-proscriptive bullshit.)

  45. “my life has been remarkably free of gender-proscriptive bullshit.”

    That’s truly a great thing.

    I remember a vulgar, but amazing Youtube comment on a song by the band Xiu Xiu. It said: “If this is gay, then someone put a dick in my ass right now!” That’s such an awesome way of putting it. Superficial labels like that shouldn’t matter. All they do is keep people in tiny boxes.

  46. As to the parenting thing, I really haven’t tried to do the online parental controls. For one thing I’m too much of a Luddite and I’d probably tear out half my hair trying to figure it out, and my plate is pretty full just trying to limit his computer time to begin with : /

    But I do really keep an eye on what he’s watching and talk to him about it. And frankly, how could I keep up with knowing what out there is kid-safe by my own standards and filter it for him? I mean, you can’t filter for misogyny or by value; I don’t care if he sees a naked body or hears a cuss word. I certainly don’t want him watching something where a fully clothed woman is being humiliated verbally because she has big tits and more courage than the protagonists (one anime scenario I walked in on and had to shut off, and he explained the justification for the scene and I told him why I wasn’t ok with that). He pretty much treats boys and girls the same, I’ve never gender-directed his play or interests or appearance. He’s at that “OMG sex is disgusting KILL THE KISSING WITH FIRE!!!” stage, but I know that won’t last. He spends most of his computer time playing Minecraft, building amazing things and blowing up creepers and spiders. I allowed him Skyrim for Xmas, but he knows things like GTA are verbotten. He hates the comments on YouTube, and I guess I’d rather take him to task for using the word “fag” than pretend he’s never heard it and delude myself that blocking comment sections will protect him from human ugliness. He has a pretty good sense of what is kind and fair, and what is just shitty and bigoted.

    As a parent, I’ve tried, as he’s grown, to help him develop his own filter, and kept a close relationship with him where we can share interests and discuss values together. Kids learn better to be their own person when the authority in their life isn’t made with a Parenting Magazine cookie cutter. It’s not easy; but I think it’s easier to raise a kid you can trust more and more as they get older, rather than try to control every aspect of their development. Because you can’t. You just do your best.

  47. “one anime scenario I walked in on and had to shut off, and he explained the justification for the scene and I told him why I wasn’t ok with that.”

    Is it Naruto? It has to be either Naruto or Bleach. Both of them have those stupid “OMG lol big bewbz” jokes. I stopped watching Bleach for a while because it got on my nerves so much.

  48. @heathenbee

    It sounds like you’re doing a wonderful job. I agree that developing their own filter is important for kids, but it still would be nice to be able to ease them into it. Sometimes it seems like the internet doesn’t really allow for that, but I’m sure that it is a lot different for today’s kids than it was for me being asked to “cyber” at 13.

  49. I agree with Some Gal, heathenbee. It’s great that you go out of your way to make sure that your kid develops tolerance. It’s something that’s severely lacking these days.

  50. “Interesting. I was always the opposite, attracted to colorful and shiny things (even in regards to clothing) as a boy. It led my parents to start questioning my sexual orientation. I even recently got a nyan cat bumper sticker and had people tell me “You know that makes you look gay, right?”

    Whenever people tell me I seem gay now I just say “good.””

    As a 4-y-o, my aunt admonished me for running around topless in the summer like the boys by asking me “Don’t you want to grow up to be a lady?” I was flabergasted at the idea, especially if “being a lady” meant not getting the same benefits as being a boy : P I had dolls and a dollhouse, but spent at least as much time with my brother’s Legos and Hotwheels. Mostly I read, made art, and hung out in the bushes studying bugs. When I grew up I was often mis-identified as a lesbian for years (actually, probably still am, despite the shaving and lipstick lol). A lot of men have expressed intimidation of me, but I’m pretty sure it’s because I think and act the way it’s admired in, and acceptable and expected of *men*, but criticized in women.

    So kids are brought up to believe acting “like a girl” is an insult (to boys *and* girls), and acting like a boy is a compliment, but girls are not allowed.

  51. “When I grew up I was often mis-identified as a lesbian for years (actually, probably still am, despite the shaving and lipstick lol).”

    Mis-identified by stereotypers; don’t want anyone to think I’m stereotyping….

  52. “When I grew up I was often mis-identified as a lesbian for years (actually, probably still am, despite the shaving and lipstick lol).”

    Well it’s an interesting thing. For decades homosexuality was stigmatized and stereotyped. Gay men did things considered “feminine,” while lesbians did “manly” things. It was another way to scare people into the traditional gender roles.

    Now, however, homosexual people are more accepted than ever and that tactic is starting to lose its effectiveness. It still works with MRAs and the frat-bro types, but the average person is less afraid of being labeled a homosexual.

  53. @atomicgrizzly, he says it was Desert Punk. At the time he explained it was an anomalous scene, and I didn’t forbid him from watching it. I’d rather have to drill it into his head why that kind of thing is offensive to me than just censor his watching it.

    @Some Girl, I think one of the improvements in cyberland in the last 10-20 years is that it’s so common-place for kids to be involved with it, they check in with each other as to what’s cool at *their* level, there’s a lot more available for them where they can feel comfortable rather than having to tough it out with the big kids, if that makes sense. Often the older ones or adults look out for them. And the online world has mainstreamed so much, rather than being the venue of hardcore and fringe-culture geeks. Obviously there’s some ugly scary shit out there, too, and probably more real danger. But I think the Lord of the Flies aspect of old school internets has diminished considerably.

  54. “it was Desert Punk.”

    Wow, okay. WAAAAAAAY worse than Naruto or Bleach.

  55. @heathenbee

    But I think the Lord of the Flies aspect of old school internets has diminished considerably.

    It’s hard for me to see exactly how (and how much) the internet has changed because I did so much changing at the same time. I attribute probably too much to my skill at navigating improving and my understanding of myself/what I want to be doing on it and not enough to the internet itself and everybody on it. Fallout from the self-centeredness of my teenage years, I suppose.

  56. “the average person is less afraid of being labeled a homosexual.”

    Extremely true. I mean, just driving by a city highschool when it lets out, 30% of those kids would get their asses kicked daily in my day because their appearance would have labeled them as “gay”. It makes me happy to see them.

  57. @Some Girl, it’s people like you that made the modern internet what it is now, self-attribute away :)

  58. Michael Ian Black always jokes about being called gay. He actually said this in an interview:

    “I am so comfortable in my sexual skin right now that if somebody wants to stick something up my ass, that’s fine. Just give me the drugs. I’ll be fine. I guess what I’m saying is, I will willingly trade drugs for gay sex.”

    Needless to say, Black Magic is awesome.

  59. I’m the opposite. I like that boys and men are watching MLP because it breaks down the whole idea that boys are supposed to like a certain set of things and girls are supposed to like another set of things. I love that. Why should anyone be limited in what they’re allowed to like?

    I don’t mind ‘em watching it, either, it’s the pushing-out of women’s voices in the fandom I object to.

    Sorry if I pushed GENDER NORMATIVITY buttons. :(

  60. I don’t mind ‘em watching it, either, it’s the pushing-out of women’s voices in the fandom I object to.”

    No, I get it. even the name “brony” suggests that it’s a “guy thing.”

  61. http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/01/07/the-saddest-graph-youll-see-today/?tid=pm_pop

    cloudiah posted the graph yesterday. It’s the comments that are worth reading will make you vomit. MRAs in abundance.

  62. “NWO was the one who first brought fringed flags to my attention. That and CAPITAL LETTERS creating a binding contract. Man, that was a fun night.”

    More things I did not know about NWO!

    “*tips head* So… any ideas? All I have said on this thread is “wut” when Dingus The Dim claimed to be a high-school teacher.”

    Totally missed that, and am also going wut?

    “So kids are brought up to believe acting “like a girl” is an insult (to boys *and* girls), and acting like a boy is a compliment, but girls are not allowed.”

    And now if your random EA moment of the day —

    “Going back to the basis, the phrase ‘Fight Like A Girl’, and we’ve all heard that growing up. And by that they mean that you’re some kind of weakling and have no skills as a male. It’s said to little boys when they can’t fight yet, and it ridicules us. By the time we were born, the most of us hear things which program you to accept and know that you are less than your male counter part. It comes apparent in the way you’re paid for your job, it comes apparent when yóu are not allowed to go outside after a certain hour because you stand a good chance of getting raped while no one says that to your boyfriend. While women, anywhere, live in some kind of fear, there is no equality and that is mathematically impossible. We cannot see that change or solved in our lifetimes, but we have to do everything that we can. We should remind ourselves that we are fifty-one percent. Everyone should know that fighting like a girl is a positive thing and that there is not inherently anything wrong with us by the fact that we are born like ladies. That is a beautiful thing that we should never be put down because of. Being compared to a woman should only make a man feel stronger. It should be a compliment. In this world we’re creating it actually is.

    I remember this one guy who came to our show in Texas or something and he had painted his shirt “real men fight like a girl”, and I cried, because he was going away in the army next day. He bought my book because he wanted something he could read over there. I just hoped that this men, fully straight and fully male can maintain and retain all of those things that make him understand us, and what makes him so beautiful. A lot of military training is step one: you take all those guys and put them in front of bunch of hardcore videogames where you kill a bunch of people and become desensitised. But that is NOT power! I will not do that. I will not become less of a human being and I refuse to give up my femininity because that’s bullshit. I’m not going to have to shave my head and become all buff and all that to be able to say “now I’m powerful” because that’s bullshit. All of this, all of us, we are power. You don’t have to change anything to be strong.”

  63. I’m the opposite. I like that boys and men are watching MLP because it breaks down the whole idea that boys are supposed to like a certain set of things and girls are supposed to like another set of things. I love that. Why should anyone be limited in what they’re allowed to like?

    That’s my take, too. I think bronies are a sign of a very significant positive development because, historically, gender neutrality always stemmed from girls and women assimilating male things–virtually never vice versa.

    The undertones are pretty bad: Boys’ stuff is good because it’s for boys, and so it seems rather natural for girls to want it (and when they’re discouraged, there’s an implication that they’re not good enough for it, eg, science), but girls’ stuff is essentially defined by being too uninteresting to attract boys. There’s no historical trend of boys/men taking over girls’ cartoons like Strawberry Shortcake or Rainbow Brite, because it was assumed that boys’ cartoons were better. There’s also the male-as-neutral theme: Boys’ stuff is for boys (and girls if they’re interested); girls’ stuff is for girls, only, ever. Blue and pink as gendered colors are good examples.

    Consider naming: Names move from being always male to being gender-neutral as girls start being given those names (Elliot, Riley), because girls with male-sounding names sound cool and empowered, whereas boys with female-sounding names will get teased and called sissies. Eventually, originally-male names stop being given to boys and become entirely female (Ashley).

    So I think this is a positive trend regardless of the actual behavior of the bronies. In fact I think their bad behavior is largely a backlash against this very problem: The conditioning that boys and men shouldn’t like girl things is still there, so they justify themselves by reinterpreting MLP:FIM as being for men.

    With any luck, the existence of bronies will help remove that conditioning from younger boys and they’ll be more able to like girl-oriented stuff without worrying that it isn’t masculine enough.

  64. Freitag, those comments are … predictable. But terrible.

    Speaking of terrible, did the following article get posted here? I am behind on my reading, so apologies for any duplication.

    FEMINISM KILLS 27 AT US HIGH SCHOOL.

  65. Oh, FFS. What a crock of shit. Only true MRAs can connect dots that don’t exist and come up with bullshit like that.

  66. Not to mention that Lanza was 17 when his parents split up. We must not mention that, because it shoots great big holes in their pet theory.

  67. I can’t give credit, because I can’t remember now where I read it, but someone sarcastically noted that that just proves how efficient feminism was at f*%&ing Lanza up. That’s why I thought maybe it was posted here — we’re pretty good at the sarcasm thing.

  68. My god, what CAN’T feminism do? I need a nap, I’ve been busy.

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